Article

Migration and HIV risk behaviors: Puerto Rican drug injectors in New York City and Puerto Rico.

National Development and Research Institutes Inc, 71 West 23rd Street, 8th Floor, New York, NY 10010, USA.
American Journal of Public Health (Impact Factor: 4.23). 06/2003; 93(5):812-6. DOI: 10.2105/AJPH.93.5.812
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT We compared injection-related HIV risk behaviors of Puerto Rican current injection drug users (IDUs) living in New York City and in Puerto Rico who also had injected in the other location with those who had not.
We recruited Puerto Rican IDUs in New York City (n = 561) and in Puerto Rico (n = 312). Of the former, 39% were "newcomers," having previously injected in Puerto Rico; of the latter, 14% were "returnees," having previously injected in New York. We compared risk behaviors within each sample between those with and without experience injecting in the other location.
Newcomers reported higher levels of risk behaviors than other New York IDUs. Newcomer status (adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 1.62) and homelessness (adjusted OR = 2.52) were significant predictors of "shooting gallery" use; newcomer status also predicted paraphernalia sharing (adjusted OR = 1.67). Returnee status was not related to these variables.
Intervention services are needed that target mobile populations who are coming from an environment of high-risk behavior to one of low-risk behavior.

Download full-text

Full-text

Available from: Jonny Andia, Jan 09, 2015
0 Followers
 · 
124 Views
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This study explored whether place of birth and residence was associated with needle sharing for Puerto Rican injection drug users (IDUs) (N = 348). In-person interviews were conducted in Puerto Rico and Massachusetts during 2005-2007. Multivariate regression analyses revealed IDUs born and living in Puerto Rico were four times more likely to have shared needles compared to those residing in Massachusetts. Respondents residing in Massachusetts were 76% less likely to have ever shared needles with an HIV-positive individual, controlling for covariates. Findings highlight the increased HIV-risk of Puerto Rican IDUs born and residing in Puerto Rico. Prevention and treatment needs are discussed.
    Substance Use &amp Misuse 05/2010; 45(10):1605-22. DOI:10.3109/10826081003682842 · 1.23 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: From 2005 to 2008, the Bienvenidos Project trained Puerto Rican patients of New York City and New Jersey Methadone Maintenance Treatment Programs to conduct peer-based community outreach to migrant Puerto Rican drug users to reduce migrants' HIV risk behaviors. Ethnographic research, including focus groups, individual interviews, and observations, was conducted with a subset of the patients trained as peers (n = 49; 67% male; mean age 40.3 years) to evaluate the self-perceived effects of the intervention. Results of the ethnographic component of this study are summarized. The role of ethnographic methods in implementing and evaluating this kind of intervention is also discussed.
    Substance Use &amp Misuse 02/2010; 45(3):414-36. DOI:10.3109/10826080903452439 · 1.23 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Using cross-sectional analysis we examined residential status and associated differences in HIV risk behaviors among 3266 young IDUs enrolled in an HIV prevention trial. A three-level outcome (homeless (37%), equivocally housed (17%), housed (46%)) was defined based on responses to two questions assessing subjective and objective criteria for homelessness: "equivocally housed" participants were discordant on these measures. In multivariate analysis, antecedents of homelessness were having lived in an out-of-home placement, been thrown out of the home or in juvenile detention, and experienced childhood abuse; while correlates included receiving income from other and illegal sources, drinking alcohol or using methamphetamine at least daily, using shooting galleries, backloading, and sex work. A subset of these variables was associated with being equivocally housed. HIV risk varies by housing status, with homeless IDUs at highest risk. Programs for IDUs should utilize a more specific definition of residential status to target IDUs needing intervention.
    AIDS and Behavior 12/2007; 11(6):854-63. DOI:10.1007/s10461-007-9248-1 · 3.49 Impact Factor