Article

Factors that influence nurses’ job satisfaction

Division of Planning, Tri-Service General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan.
JONA The Journal of Nursing Administration (Impact Factor: 1.37). 06/2003; 33(5):293-9. DOI: 10.1097/00005110-200305000-00005
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT To examine factors affecting the job satisfaction of registered nurses (RNs).
A growing recognition of job dissatisfaction among RNs in South Carolina hospitals has contributed to current problems with recruitment and retention. If administrators identify factors influencing RNs' job satisfaction in hospitals and implement strategies to address these factors, RN turnover rates will decrease and recruiting and retention rates will increase.
A cross-sectional study of secondary data was designed to identify the individual, work, and geographic factors that impact nursing job satisfaction at the state level. A 27-question self-administered survey was sent to 17,500 RNs in South Carolina with postage-paid envelopes for their responses. Surveys from 3472 nurses were completed anonymously. Univariate statistics were used to describe the study sample. One-way and multivariable Analysis of Variance were used to determine which variables contributed the most to job satisfaction.
For about two thirds of the RNs, job satisfaction remained the same or had lessened over the past 2 years. In addition, statistically significant differences were found between job satisfaction and years of service, job position, hospital retirement plan, and geographic area.
The findings have implications for nurse managers and hospital administrators for planning and implementing effective health policies that will meet the unique needs of their staffs and organizations. Such research is particularly relevant in this difficult time of nursing shortages throughout the healthcare industry.

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    • "One possible explanation for this may be that nurses with more years of work experience expect more autonomy, respect and opportunities ; thus, when these factors do not exist, experienced nurses may become dissatisfied. Likewise, Ma et al. (2003) also reported that experienced nurses had lower levels of job satisfaction than those who were inexperienced. Therefore, it is recommended that nurse managers conduct regular job satisfaction surveys in order to understand the needs of different nurse groups (Choi et al. 2011) which also give nurses the chance to voice opinions about their training, advancement opportunities and other issues related to their job satisfaction. "
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    ABSTRACT: Job satisfaction is a critical factor in health care. Strong empirical evidence supports a causal relationship between job satisfaction, patient safety and quality of care. To determine the level of nurses' job satisfaction and its associated factors. A stratified random sample of 421 registered nurses working at a large hospital in Mashhad, Iran was surveyed. The results showed that autonomy, task requirement and work interaction had scores higher than their respective median on the subscales. There were significant differences between demographic characteristics and the autonomy, task requirement, work interaction, salary, work condition, professional development, supportive nursing management, decision making, professional status subscales and mean total job satisfaction. In univariate analysis, young age, being female and being married were significantly associated with a higher level of job satisfaction. The adjusted R(2) for this model was 0.14, indicating that the model explained 14% of the variability. The regression model was highly significant, F (4298) = 13.194, P < 0.001. The authors emphasise that the human resources policies and incentives need to be re-visited. Efforts undertaken to improve working conditions, supportive nursing management, improved professional status, professional development and increased salaries are some of the ways for nurse managers to improve job satisfaction.
    Journal of Nursing Management 09/2013; 23(4). DOI:10.1111/jonm.12151 · 1.14 Impact Factor
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    • "According to Murrells et al. (2005) an understanding of the relationship between job characteristics and job satisfaction is essential to contextualise and explore this complex subject in specific groups of nurses. Such information can then be utilised by organisations constructively to address sources of job dissatisfaction amongst nurses and to reduce the likelihood of absenteeism and attrition (Shields & Ward 2001, Ma et al. 2003). A literature search of the databases CINAHL and PubMed (1991–2007) using key words 'job satisfaction' and 'nurse practitioners or advanced nurse practitioners' resulted in 33 hits and eight studies relevant to the concept of job satisfaction and ANP [seven studies undertaken in the United States (US) specifically evaluating job satisfaction of ANPs and one Canadian study that investigated ANP perceptions of job strain]. "
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    ABSTRACT: To describe the level of job satisfaction of advanced nurse practitioners (ANP) and advanced midwife practitioners in the Republic of Ireland (RoI). Job satisfaction is related to productivity, performance, turnover and health, and thus is a challenge for nursing and healthcare organisations. Job satisfaction data were collected from 47 ANPs using the Misener Nurse Practitioner Job Satisfaction Scale. High levels of global job satisfaction were reported. All ANPs reported satisfaction with autonomy, sense of accomplishment, challenge, social interaction and status in the organisation. Lower levels of job satisfaction were attributed to the amount of involvement in research (55%), opportunities to receive compensation for services provided outside normal working hours (55%), the amount (44%) and the quality of administrative support (51%), and the opportunity to negotiate bonuses and resources in return for productivity (36%). Advanced nurse practitioners in RoI have high levels of job satisfaction with areas relating to clinical practice but are dissatisfied with areas that lead to empowerment within organisations. Efforts to improve the negotiating and leadership skills of ANPs may improve job satisfaction. Enhancing inter-professional collegial relationships and improving managerial recognition of the role within nursing are key areas to be targeted to promote job satisfaction of ANPs.
    Journal of Nursing Management 07/2013; 23(1). DOI:10.1111/jonm.12096 · 1.14 Impact Factor
    • "According to Murrells et al. (2005) an understanding of the relationship between job characteristics and job satisfaction is essential to contextualise and explore this complex subject in specific groups of nurses. Such information can then be utilised by organisations constructively to address sources of job dissatisfaction amongst nurses and to reduce the likelihood of absenteeism and attrition (Shields & Ward 2001, Ma et al. 2003). A literature search of the databases CINAHL and PubMed (1991–2007) using key words 'job satisfaction' and 'nurse practitioners or advanced nurse practitioners' resulted in 33 hits and eight studies relevant to the concept of job satisfaction and ANP [seven studies undertaken in the United States (US) specifically evaluating job satisfaction of ANPs and one Canadian study that investigated ANP perceptions of job strain]. "
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