Article

Maternal smoking and smoking in adolescents: a prospective community study of adolescents and their mothers.

Clinical Psychology and Epidemiology Unit, Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry, Munich, Germany.
European Addiction Research (Impact Factor: 2.07). 08/2003; 9(3):120-30. DOI: 10.1159/000070980
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT The associations between maternal smoking and nicotine dependence and patterns of smoking and nicotine dependence in offspring were examined in a large community-based sample of adolescents. Data were derived from baseline and 4-year follow-up assessments of 938 respondents aged 14-17 years at the outset of the Early Developmental Stages of Psychopathology (EDSP) study, a prospective-longitudinal community study of adolescents and young adults and their parents respectively. Smoking and nicotine dependence in respondents were assessed using the Munich Composite International Diagnostic Interview (DSM-IV algorithms). Diagnostic information about smoking behavior in mothers was collected by independent direct diagnostic interviews with the mothers. In comparison to children of non- or occasionally smoking mothers, children of regularly smoking and nicotine-dependent mothers had higher probabilities of using tobacco as well as of developing nicotine dependence. For all ages under consideration, survival analyses revealed a higher cumulative lifetime risk of regular smoking and nicotine dependence among these children. Maternal smoking during pregnancy seems to represent an additional risk for these outcomes in children, specifically with regard to the risk of developing nicotine dependence. Associations were comparable for sons and daughters. Our findings show that maternal smoking predicts escalation of smoking, development of nicotine dependence, and stability of smoking behavior in children. Implications for specific intervention and prevention efforts are discussed.

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    • "The most likely adults that adolescents would spend time around are their parents. Parents' smoking is associated with adolescent nicotine dependence symptoms (Lieb et al., 2003; Kandel et al., 2007) as well as smoking initiation and escalation (Bricker et al., 2006; Bricker, Peterson, Sarason, Andersen, & Rajan, 2007). Therefore, the current study's results would be consistent with interpretation that adults' smoking is a proxy indicator of the role of parents' smoking in adolescent nicotine dependence symptoms. "
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    • "Smoking during pregnancy has been associated with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (Milberger et al., 1998), conduct disorder (e.g., destructive and aggressive behavior)(Braun et al., 2008; Wakschlag et al., 1997), and cognitive deficits (Naeye and Peters, 1984) in the offspring. In addition, the children of mothers who smoked during their pregnancy are more likely to develop a tobacco dependency than the children of mothers who did not smoke (Buka et al., 2003; Kandel et al., 1994; Lieb et al., 2003). "
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    Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior 03/2010; 95(4):401-9. DOI:10.1016/j.pbb.2010.02.018 · 2.82 Impact Factor
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    • "Smoking during pregnancy has been associated with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (Milberger et al., 1998), conduct disorder (e.g., destructive and aggressive behavior) (Braun et al., 2008; Wakschlag et al., 1997), and cognitive deficits (Naeye and Peters, 1984) in the offspring. In addition, the children of mothers who smoked during their pregnancy are more likely to develop a tobacco dependency than the children of mothers who did not smoke (Buka et al., 2003; Kandel et al., 1994; Lieb et al., 2003). Although epidemiological studies indicate that exposure to tobacco smoke constituents during development increases the risk for smoking, "
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