Article

Developmental expression of mouse muscleblind genes Mbnl1, Mbnl2 and Mbnl3.

Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, Powell Gene Therapy Center, University of Florida, College of Medicine, 1600 SW Archer Road, Gainesville, FL 32610-0267, USA.
Gene Expression Patterns (Impact Factor: 1.64). 09/2003; 3(4):459-62. DOI:10.1016/S1567-133X(03)00064-4
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT The RNA-mediated pathogenesis model for the myotonic dystrophies DM1 and DM2 proposes that mutant transcripts from the affected genes sequester a family of double-stranded RNA-binding factors, the muscleblind proteins MBNL1, MBNL2 and MBNL3, in the nucleus. These proteins are homologues of the Drosophila muscleblind proteins that are required for the terminal differentiation of muscle and photoreceptor tissues, and thus nuclear sequestration of the human proteins might impair their normal function in muscle and eye development and maintenance. To examine this model further, we analyzed the expression pattern of the mouse Mbnl1, Mbnl2, and Mbnl3 genes during embryonic development and compared muscleblind gene expression to Dmpk since the RNA pathogenesis model for DM1 requires the coordinate synthesis of mutant Dmpk transcripts and muscleblind proteins. Our studies reveal a striking overlap between the expression of Dmpk and the muscleblind genes during development of the limbs, nervous system and various muscles, including the diaphragm and tongue.

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