Effects of Qigong on Blood Pressure, Blood Pressure Determinants and Ventilatory Function in Middle-Aged Patients with Essential Hypertension

Department of Nursing, Mokpo Catholic University, Mokpo 530-742, Republic of Korea.
The American Journal of Chinese Medicine (Impact Factor: 2.76). 02/2003; 31(3):489-97. DOI: 10.1142/S0192415X03001120
Source: PubMed


This study was designed to measure changes in blood pressure (BP), urinary catecholamines and ventilatory functions of patients with mild essential hypertension after 10 weeks of Qigong (Shuxinpingxuegong). Fifty-eight patients volunteered to participate in this study and were randomly divided into either a Qigong group (n = 29), or a control group (n = 29). Systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure decreased significantly in the Qigong group such that both became significantly lower after 10 weeks in the Qigong than in the control group. Also, there was a significant reduction of norepinephrine, metanephrine and epinephrine compared to baseline values in the Qigong group. The ventilatory functions, forced vital capacity and forced expiratory volume per sec, were increased in the Qigong group but not the control. These results suggest that Qigong may stabilize the sympathetic nervous system is effective in modulating levels of urinary catecholamines and BP positively, and in improving ventilatory functions in mildly hypertensive middle-aged patients.

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    • "A subsample of participants would receive physiological measures on their stress responses and cardiopulmonary functions. According to previous studies [13] [14] and practical concerns, it is estimated that approximately 40 to 50 participants should be engaged in more comprehensive physiological measures using polygraph, ultrasonoscope, and microspirometer. "
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    ABSTRACT: Eight-Section Brocades and Yijin Jing consist of some routine movements that are too difficult for frail elders. A novel health qigong protocol was developed and its effectiveness for frail elders was examined using a randomized clinical trial (RCT). An expert panel performed functional anatomy analysis and safety field test prior to the RCT. The experimental group (n = 61, 83 ± 6 yr) was given a 12-week qigong exercise program, while the comparison group (n = 55, 84 ± 6 yr) participated in a newspaper reading program with the same duration and frequency. Pre-, mid-, post-, and follow-up assessments were conducted. At 12 weeks, the qigong group had significant improvements in thinking operations (F = 4.05, P = .02) and significant reduction of resting heart rate (F = 3.14, P = .045) as compared to the newspaper reading group. A trend of improvements in grip strength and a decreasing trend of depression levels were observed among the qigong group. Significant perceived improvements in physical health (F = 13.01, P = .001), activities of daily living (F = 5.32, P = .03), and overall health status (F = 15.26, P = .0001) were found. There are improvements in some aspects of psychosocial, cognitive, physical, and physiological domains. Clinical applications and possibilities for further research are discussed.
    Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine 09/2013; 2013:827392. DOI:10.1155/2013/827392 · 1.88 Impact Factor
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    • "It is claimed that qigong has potential beneficial effects on various disorders, including cardiovascular disease [75]. Several RCTs have claimed that qigong has therapeutic effects on blood pressure in patients with hypertension [76–78]. 2 SRs on the effects of qigong on hypertension revealed some encouraging evidence of qigong for lowering BP. However, the conclusiveness of these findings is limited. "
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    ABSTRACT: Hypertension is an important worldwide public -health challenge with high mortality and disability. Due to the limitations and concerns with current available hypertension treatments, many hypertensive patients, especially in Asia, have turned to Chinese medicine (CM). Although hypertension is not a CM term, physicians who practice CM in China attempt to treat the disease using CM principles. A variety of approaches for treating hypertension have been taken in CM. For seeking the best evidence of CM in making decisions for hypertensive patients, a number of clinical studies have been conducted in China, which has paved the evidence-based way. After literature searching and analyzing, it appeared that CM was effective for hypertension in clinical use, such as Chinese herbal medicine, acupuncture, moxibustion, cupping, qigong, and Tai Chi. However, due to the poor quality of primary studies, clinical evidence is still weak. The potential benefits and safety of CM for hypertension still need to be confirmed in the future with well-designed RCTs of more persuasive primary endpoints and high-quality SRs. Evidence-based Chinese medicine for hypertension still has a long way to go.
    Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine 06/2013; 2013:978398. DOI:10.1155/2013/978398 · 1.88 Impact Factor
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    • "The health effects of Qigong have been reported in various populations with chronic conditions, including high blood pressure [5] [6], bone loss [7], and cardiac disease rehabilitation [8]. While there is increasing evidence on the benefits of the Qigong practice for physical symptoms, its effects on psychological symptoms have yet to be established. "
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    ABSTRACT: Background. This pilot study examined the feasibility and efficacy of providing Qigong treatment in a health center to Chinese Americans with major depressive disorder (MDD). Methods. Fourteen Chinese Americans with MDD were enrolled, and they received a 12-week Qigong intervention. The key outcome measurement was the 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D17); the Clinical Global Impressions-Severity (CGI-S) and -Improvement (CGI-I), the Quality of Life Enjoyment and Satisfaction Questionnaire, Short Form (Q-LES-Q-SF), and the Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support (MSPSS) were also administered. Positive response was defined as a decrease of 50% or more on the HAM-D17, and remission was defined as HAM-D17 ≤ 7. Patients' outcome measurements were compared before and after the Qigong intervention. Results. Participants (N = 14) were 64% female, with a mean age of 53 (±14). A 71% of participants completed the intervention. The Qigong intervention resulted in a positive treatment-response rate of 60% and a remission rate of 40% and statistically significant improvement, as measured by the HAM-D17, CGI-S, CGI-I, Q-LES-Q-SF, and the family support subscale of the MSPSS. Conclusions. The Qigong intervention provided at a health care setting for the treatment of primary care patients with MDD is feasible. Further studies with larger sample sizes are warranted.
    Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine 04/2013; 2013(1):168784. DOI:10.1155/2013/168784 · 1.88 Impact Factor
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