Publications

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    ABSTRACT: Perceived employability (PE) has been suggested to protect well-being in times of job insecurity. Employability perceptions refer to individuals’ beliefs about their chances in the labour market. Some scholars have shown that these perceptions are also associated with the length of unemployment. However, it is not clear how PE facilitates the reemployment process. Our research aim is to investigate the relationship between PE and reemployment by analysing the mediating role played by job-search strategies and psychological distress. The two-wave study (a questionnaire during the initial contact with employment agencies and objective data on reemployment for 12 months) involved 136 workers who applied to employment agencies in 2011/2012. The results of the structural equation model analysis (partial least squares [PLS] path analysis) showed that PE positively influences reemployment through the mediation of a focused job-search strategy. Higher levels of distress attributed to job loss were associated with a haphazard job-search strategy. The hypothesis of a negative relationship between PE and psychological distress is not confirmed. Our study contributes to the literature by providing empirical evidence of the links between PE and job-search strategies. Moreover, it offers suggestions on the employability resources that counsellors could evaluate to design reemployment support offerings for their clients.
    European Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology 01/2015; Submitted. · 2.09 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: National and international studies have highlighted that healthcare workers are increasingly facing episodes of verbal and physical violence. Empirical evidence supports the hypothesis that aggressive behaviors by patients can generate burnout processes. However few studies have investigated the workplace resources that can lessen the impact of such social stressor on the well-being of healthcare workers. We analyzed if and under what circumstances different types of resources, emotional (colleagues’ support, managers’ support) and cognitive ones (decision authority and job meaning) lessen the negative impact of verbal aggression on burnout and emotional well-being. This exploratory cross-sectional study was conducted on the healthcare workers of a surgery department (133 workers with a 67% response rate). Data was collected via a self-report questionnaire. A moderated hierarchical regressions analysis highlighted that aggressive behaviors are important predictors of burnout and affective well-being. The support of colleagues and managers and, to a lesser extent, the attribution of meaning to one’s work moderate the negative impact on emotional exhaustion. Affective well-being is shown to be moderated by colleagues’ support, and by the perception of decision authority. In addition we found that the attribution of meaning to one’s work positively influences well-being in cases of highly aggressive patient behavior. The study highlights some socio-organizational factors that protect against social stressors tied to the interaction with patients in healthcare contexts.
    psicologia della salute. 01/2014; 2:121-138.
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    ABSTRACT: Patient engagement is recognized as essential for the quality of services for chronic diseases. The paper aims to explore the socio-organizational dynamics associated with the promotion of patients’ engagement and their transformation from passive consumers of medical services to partner. We present a collaborative study conducted with two health care services of a large hospital in Northern Italy, where patients and healthcare personnel cooperated to evaluate and reorient the clinical pathways towards participated processes centered on the patient. Practices were analyzed through a revised version of proactive analysis (HFMEA) and the psycho-social analysis of decision nodes of the clinical pathway, applied in the context of focus groups with mixed composition (patients, physicians, nurses, psychologists, social workers). Results revealed different representations of the nature of engagement and its nature as a changing and unstable process. In addition, the study highlighted professional assumptions and values that can give rise to an apparent participation. The study offers indications for designing collaborative practices in managing clinical pathways.
    Psicologia della salute. 01/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Fragmented nature of current careers has placed at the centre of attention the concept of employability. This paper presents an explorative study aimed at analysing employability during the occupational transition of dismissed workers. In the light of the psychosocial approach suggested by Fugate and colleagues, the principal goal was to explore the relationship between dispositional employability and two crucial aspects of outplacement, re-employment and physical and mental health, hypothesizing a mediating role of perceived employability and perceived utility of outplacement services. The research involved pharmaceutical workers on unemployment benefit. Our analysis confirmed that dispositional employability can be considered as a latent multidimensional construct which sparingly summarizes three latent dimensions (self-efficacy in managing work changes; social capital; work career proactivity). Results highlighted that dispositional employability has a fairly direct impact on physical and mental health, but it is not associated with reemployment. Moreover perceived employability mediates the relationship between dispositional employability and perceived utility of outplacement services, while it doesn’t have a direct connection with psychophysical health. Implications on career counselling are discussed.
    11/2013;
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    ABSTRACT: In Emergency Departments, fragmentation and breakdown in information exchange can be important factors leading to adverse events. This article aims to consider the critical aspects of collaborative teamwork in Emergency Departments that may have an impact on the information flow. On the basis of Distributed Cognition Theory, we have assumed that cognitive outcomes in critical-care settings are not confined to the thoughts of isolated individuals; rather, they are better understood as properties of a distributed cognitive system across the minds of the clinical team members and across the technological artefacts. We report on an exploratory ethnographic study of two Emergency Departments. Data were collected over a period of four months in 2008 via observation and interviews. The results highlight a specific distribution of cognitive work between physicians and nurses. The nurse's roles as information highlighter, memory keeper and process organizer helped to ensure the information flow and to overcome some of the problems identified with the computer-assisted communication process. Such distribution of cognitive work improved care quality, but it crossed established professional boundaries. As cross-boundary distribution of cognitive work in Emergency Departments can be perceived as role substitution, building an interprofessional working system is needed to avoid information breakdown in fast-moving contexts. To realize an interprofessional working system, practice-based training is required, aimed at developing a deep understanding of team cognition.
    Journal of Advanced Nursing 10/2013; · 1.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The current study’s explored if and how psychosocial resources of employability contribute to mental health of dismissed workers. Degree of outplacement services use, perceived employability and perceived organizational lay-off justice were examined as mediators of the relation between personal employability and mental health. The research involved dismissed workers in the pharmaceutical industry, who joined programs of re-employment sponsored by companies. Structural equation results showed that the lay off workers with higher personal employability were less likely to have mental health deterioration. Furthermore psychosocial resources of personal employability directly increased perceptions of having job available alternatives and was indirectly associated with a higher degree of use of outplacement programs, but these variables didn’t mediate the relation with mental health. Lay-off justice had a direct positive impact on mental health, but it was not relate with employability. Our study contributes to understand some psychological processes that can affect the decision to utilise outplacement programs and offers suggestions for employability profiling.
    Quality and Quantity 01/2013; · 0.76 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Frequent reorganization and downsizing processes caused a dramatic increase of occupational transitions, having a strong impact on career models. Whereas job security is assumed to be important in predicting employees’ well-being under a traditional career model, employability is considered crucial for the workers well-being under the new conditions of labour market. In general the concept of employability, from the individual worker’s perspective, is “an indicator of his or her opportunity to acquire and to keep an attractive job in the internal or external labor market”. While there are several studies on employability of employees, there are only few studies on dismissed workers, who are managing an involuntary transition that is not linked to a personal career project. One of the objectives of labour policies is to set out preventive actions identifying in advance workers who are at risk of long-term unemployment. To implement this objective it is important to identify employability resources and protective factors to play on. However there isn’t enough empirical evidence of the applicability of the construct of employability to involuntary occupational transitions and it is uncertain the dimensions of personal employability that should be developed to minimize the risk of depression and to sustain the worker in his/her search of a new post. Moreover in Italian outplacement services there isn’t an agreed system of employability profiling. Starting from the mental and physical approach to employability suggested by Fugate and partners (Fugate, et al., 2004; Fugate and Kinicki, 2008), the aim of our contribution is to analyze the role of employability in re-employment processes for dismissed workers. Through structural equation models we want to study the relation between personal employability resources and mental and physical health. We want therefore to understand if and how some variables influence this relation. These variables have been identified as potential risk factors in unemployment situations: the perception of organizational justice, the perceived employability and the perceived utility of re-employment services. Our research involved dismissed workers in the pharmaceutical sector, who joined programs of requalification and re-employment sponsored by companies within a Welfare-to-Work project called Welfarma.
    7th International Conference on Partial Least Squares and Related Methods, Houston, Texas, USA; 05/2012
  • Guglielmetti C, Gilardi S. Casati S. Monti P
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    ABSTRACT: This paper presents the results of a study on 137 adult patients with Thalassemia Major. On the basis of the literature on the dimensions characterizing the management of chronic illness, the paper has examined the relationship between factors of collaborative care management and perception of illness control in relation to two satisfaction outcomes: for the Quality of care and for the Quality of life. In addition, the paper includes an exploratory investigation of the role the construct "Sense of belonging to the community of care". It is hypothesized that a higher level on this variable is associated with greater satisfaction for the quality of care and for the quality of life. The results confirm the relevance of the construct "Sense of belonging to the community of care" as a significant predictor of both outcomes. Satisfaction with care is also explained by the Trust factor, while Satisfaction with the quality of life is predicted by the Perception of control over the disease.
    Psicologia della Salute. 01/2012; 1:87-109.
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    Silvia Gilardi, Chiara Guglielmetti
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    ABSTRACT: In the light of the literature on student engagement, social integration, and adult learning, an empirical study (n = 228 students) explored the relationship between first-year academic experience and non-traditional students’ retention. Results show that engagement, social integration, and meaningfulness of learning experience have different effects on non-traditional and traditional students’ retention.
    The Journal of Higher Education 02/2011; 82(1):33-53. · 1.15 Impact Factor
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    Andreina Bruno, Laura Galuppo, Silvia Gilardi
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    ABSTRACT: Reflexivity is a primary requirement for professional work. Our aim was to describe a methodology suitable for detecting the development of reflexive practice through the analysis of 59 Master’s degree students’ journals. We explore the use and changes of reflexive practice in relation to the settings and activities of the course using analysis of the mental language: We analyse how the reflexive practice is characterized, how it evolves through time and how it can be promoted. Data analysis shows that reflexivity is not monodimensional but multidimensional. Reflexive practice increases during the course: The different dimensions vary over time according to different organizational and educational conditions. This methodology allows us to formulate new hypotheses about which elements of the setting and process are effective in supporting participants’ reflexive practice. KeywordsReflexivity–Mental language–Evaluation–Professional development–Learning–Reflective journal
    European Journal of Psychology of Education 01/2011; 26(4):527-543. · 0.61 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Motivation - Why and how do expert unexpectedly change from their original plan in dynamic, uncertain settings? Research approach - Critical event interviews of practitioners self-reporting cases of sudden plan changes. Findings - Sudden plan changes developed in much the same manner as an expert's initial plan in recognition-primed decision-making. Limitations - Cases were limited to the healthcare domain; self-reporting distorts some aspects of the events; only cases where the change in plan worked were volunteered. Originality/Value - Many studies have examined persistence in an erroneous plan; fewer have examined sudden switches from bad to good plans. Take away message - Sudden plan changes arise in ways similar to experts' initial plan formulations: appearing as if unbidden, often not preceded by growing awareness of the need for reassessment, and once present seem obviously correct.
    Proceedings of the 9th Bi-annual international conference on Naturalistic Decision Making; 06/2009
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    ABSTRACT: Motivation - Healthcare are rapidly replacing manual with computerized artefacts for many reasons, but the impact on users of the technology is often assumed to be neutral. Approach - Three presentations of the increasingly more intensive use of computer technology in healthcare will be discussed by panelists and audience to explore the problem space. A closing presentation will highlight issues in designing technology that is both usable and useful to frontline workers. Originality/Value - There is great pressure to speed up the introduction of technology in healthcare, but a "rush to implementation" risks serious design problems. Take away message - Technological artefacts are introduced to meet many needs, but if users' needs are not taken into account, the technology may founder or be subverted.
    06/2009;
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    09/2006: pages 173-192;
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    ABSTRACT: TOPICS Naturalistic decision making and sensemaking process in the clinical teams.
  • Silvia Gilardi, Edoardo Lozza
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    ABSTRACT: Innovative strategies in inquiry-based learning are recognized as improving the quality of higher education learning, but there is a need to explore whether and how these strategies promote the development of professional identity among undergraduates. In this article we describe an inquiry-based course, situated in a European context, which is designed to support students’ professional identity development through reflective practice; and we present the assessment of students’ learning outcomes. Results highlight the key roles of field research, peer groups, and a narrative approach in promoting positive student attitudes toward reflecting on their production of knowledge and in developing their professional identity.
    Innovative Higher Education 34(4):245-256.

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