Shuvra Das

Mechanical Engineering

Ph.D.
17.66

Publications

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    Mohan Krishnan · Shuvra Das · Sandra A. Yost
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    ABSTRACT: This paper describes the second and third phases of a comprehensive mechatronics curriculum development effort. They encompass the development of two advanced mechatronics courses (¿Simulation and Modeling of Mechatronic Systems¿ and ¿Sensors and Actuators for Mechatronic Systems¿), the formulation of a Mechatronics concentration, and offshoot research activities in the mechatronics area. The first phase involved the design of an ¿Introduction to Mechatronics¿ course and the infusion of mechatronic activities throughout the curriculum and in outreach activities and has been described in a companion paper ¿A 10-Year Mechatronics Curriculum Development Initiative: Relevance, Content, and Results-Part I¿ (IEEE Transactions on Education, vol. 53, no. 2, May 2010).
    IEEE Transactions on Education 06/2010; 53(2-53):202 - 208. DOI:10.1109/TE.2008.2011542 · 1.22 Impact Factor
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    Shuvra Das · Sandra A. Yost · Mohan Krishnan
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    ABSTRACT: This paper describes the first phase of a Mechatronics Curriculum Development effort-the design of an ¿Introduction to Mechatronics¿ course, the infusion of mechatronics activities throughout the curriculum and in outreach activities, and assessment results. In addition, the relevance and impact of such a curriculum on the education of engineers in relation to the evolving global economy is discussed. The second and third phases of this effort included development of two advanced mechatronics courses and the formulation of a mechatronics curriculum, which will be addressed in a companion paper, ¿A 10-Year Mechatronics Curriculum Development Initiative: Relevance, Content, and Results-Part II¿ (IEEE Transactions on Education, vol. 53, no. 2, May 2010).
    IEEE Transactions on Education 06/2010; 53(2-53):194 - 201. DOI:10.1109/TE.2008.2011539 · 1.22 Impact Factor
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    Shuvra Das
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    ABSTRACT: Today's automotive and electronics technologies are evolving so rapidly that educators and industry are both challenged to re-educate the technological workforce in the new area before they are replaced with yet another generation. In early November 2009 Ford's Product Development senior management formally approved a proposal by the University of Detroit Mercy to transform 125 of Ford's “IC Engine Automotive Engineers” into “Advanced Electric Vehicle Automotive Engineers.” Two months later, the first course of the Advanced Electric Vehicle Program began in Dearborn. UDM's response to Ford's needs (and those of other OEM's and suppliers) was not only at the rate of “academic light speed,” but it involved direct collaboration of Ford's electric vehicle leaders and subject matter experts and the UDM AEV Program faculty. In fact, before teaching each course, the UDM engineering and science professors will work for one or two months in the Ford engineering group that is directly involved in the design and development of the systems that the course focuses on (batteries, e-drive systems, power electronics, etc). The prime architects of this process and curriculum include the UDM dean, associate dean and faculty of engineering and science from UDM, and Ford Learning & Development managers and Product Development leaders from Sustainable Mobility Technologies and Research & Advanced organizations. Such a rapid and highly responsive curriculum development is not the norm in academia. To accomplish this outcome UDM had to be more customer-focused like industry and Ford needed to embrace academic priorities and provide access to its electric vehicle SME's by UDM faculty. The paper will discuss the following related issues: building the relationship and trust between Ford and UDM; collaborative development; “just in time” development and deployment of curriculum; shared investment; modularizing education (it doesn't always have to be in “degree-sized chunks”), linking suppliers and OEMs; balancing service to corporations and service to students.
    SAE International Journal of Passenger Cars - Electronic and Electrical Systems 01/2010; 3(2)(10-18). DOI:10.4271/2010-01-2303.
  • Shuvra Das
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    ABSTRACT: Bond graphs are especially well-suited for mechatronic systems, as engineering system modeling is best handled using a multidisciplinary approach. Bond graphing permits one to see the separate components of an engineering system as a unified whole, and allows these components to be categorized under a few generalized elements, even when they come from different disciplines. In addition to those advantages, the bond graph offers a visual representation of a system from which derivation of the governing equations is algorithmic. This makes the design process accessible to beginning readers, providing them with a practical understanding of mechatronic systems.Mechatronic Modeling and Simulation Using Bond Graphs is written for those who have some hands-on experience with mechatronic systems, enough to appreciate the value of computer modeling and simulation. Avoiding elaborate mathematical derivations and proofs, the book is written for modelers seeking practical results in addition to theoretical confirmations. Key concepts are revealed step-by-step, supported by the application of rudimentary examples that allow readers to develop confidence in their approach right from the start. For those who take the effort to master its application, the use of bond graph methodology in system modeling can be very satisfying in the way it unifies information garnered from different disciplines. In the second half of the book after readers have learned how to develop bond graph models, the author provides simulation results for engineering examples that encourage readers to model, simulate, and practice as they progress through the chapters. Although the models can be simulated using any number of software tools, the text employs 20Sim for all the simulation work in this text. A free version of the software can be downloaded from the 20Sim Web site.
    01/2009; CRC Press., ISBN: 978-1-4398-8315-0
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    ABSTRACT: Cultural practices in India that dictate that individuals remove their footwear before entering homes and places of worship creates a challenge for visually-impaired people in identifying and collecting their footwear as they leave. This paper describes an interdisciplinary service-learning project, involving students in Electrical & Computer Engineering (ECE) and the Mechanical Engineering (ME) programs, whose goal is to design and develop assistive technologies to help ameliorate this situation. The paper outlines the relevant technological issues in this project, and discusses how this research might be incorporated into the existing pedagogical structure of both programs.
    Proceedings - Frontiers in Education Conference 01/2009; DOI:10.1109/FIE.2009.5350518
  • Shuvra Das · Nader Zamani
    04/2008; Schroff Development Corp., ISBN: 978-1585034758
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    Shuvra Das
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    ABSTRACT: Current trends in the auto industry requiring tighter dimensional specifications combined with the use of lightweight materials, such as aluminum, are a challenge for the traditional manufacturing processes. The hemming process, a sheet metal bending operation used in the manufacturing of car doors and hoods, poses problems meeting tighter dimensional tolerances. Hemming is the final operation that is used to fasten the outer panel with the inner panel by folding the outer panel over the inner panel. Roll in/out is one of the main quality concerns with hemming, and keeping it under tolerance is a high priority issue for the auto manufacturers. Current hemming process technology, given the mechanical properties of current materials, has reached its saturation limit to deliver consistent dimensional quality to satisfy customers and at the same time meet government standards. Combining warm forming techniques with the traditional hemming process represents a new approach with the potential to overcome the current hemming limitation and to provide a satisfactory solution to all the requirements. The main objective of this research is to understand the effect of localized heating on the final quality in the hemming process by quantifying the influence of key geometrical and process parameters. To achieve this goal, a hemming finite element model, taking into consideration the mechanical properties as function of temperature is developed, and statistical methods to quantify the effect of key variables are employed. As an outcome to this study, the effectiveness of using warm forming techniques to improve hemming quality is assessed for A5182O aluminum, one of the most common used materials for this application.
    SAE World Congress 2007, Detroit, MI; 04/2007
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    Pariksha Tomar · Shuvra Das
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    ABSTRACT: The feeddrive of a CNC machine is a mechatronic system consisting of motor, mechanical transmission devices and the worktable. The accuracy and precision of the feeddrive system determines the final part quality. Hence closed control of the drive system is very important. Accurate modeling of this system and its simulation helps in system design and parametric optimization. In this paper, bond graph based approach has been used to model the feeddrive of a CNC machine. This technique is based on power flow and uses a basic component types to develop models for complex multi-physics systems. The governing equations can be algorithmically derived from a visual representation of the system. In this model all linear and nonlinear effects such as backlash, stick-slip friction and cutting forces have been accounted for. The model is also enhanced through the addition of a control loop for position and velocity.
    SAE World Congress 2007; 04/2007
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    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Current trends in the auto industry requiring tighter dimensional specifications combined with the use of lightweight materials, such as aluminum, are a challenge for the traditional manufacturing processes. The hemming process, a sheet metal bending operation used in the manufacturing of car doors and hoods, poses problems meeting tighter dimensional tolerances. Hemming is the final operation that is used to fasten the outer panel with the inner panel by folding the outer panel over the inner panel. Roll in/out is one of the main quality concerns with hemming, and keeping it under tolerance is a high priority issue for the auto manufacturers. Current hemming process technology, given the mechanical properties of current materials, has reached its saturation limit to deliver consistent dimensional quality to satisfy customers and at the same time meet government standards. Combining warm forming techniques with the traditional hemming process represents a new approach with the potential to overcome the current hemming limitation and to provide a satisfactory solution to all the requirements. The main objective of this research is to understand the effect of localized heating on the final quality in the hemming process by quantifying the influence of key geometrical and process parameters. To achieve this goal, a hemming finite element model, taking into consideration the mechanical properties as function of temperature is developed, and statistical methods to quantify the effect of key variables are employed. As an outcome to this study, the effectiveness of using warm forming techniques to improve hemming quality is assessed for A5182O aluminum, one of the most common used materials for this application.
  • Shuvra Das · Nader Zamani
    11/2006; Schroff Development Corp., ISBN: 978-1585033331
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    Robert Langdorf · Shuvra Das · Mohan Krishnan
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    ABSTRACT: When an electric motor is switched off, an amount of energy, dependent on the design of the motor, can be emitted to the power device. Some of this energy is stored in the capacitors and needs to be discharged when the circuit is shut off. Also, the current through the inductive components changes rapidly, causing a large voltage to be discharged from the circuit. This phenomenon poses potential problems in automotive applications since this energy surge, known generally as a conducted transient, could cause damage to other electrical devices that share the same power grid. Automotive motors generally also have radio frequency interference filtering devices, which are significant contributors to this conducted transient energy. This study attempts to analyze the various characteristics of the windshield wiper motor and relay system and assess what type of filtering devices or other designable components could be used to maintain the filtering capability while reducing the harmful transient emissions. The first part of the approach includes creating a working circuit model. To accomplish this, several measurements are taken and several assumptions made about the components and their environment. Also, a known physical test result was used to aid in making the model representative. Once the model is complete, computer simulations of potential design solutions are executed and correlated to each other. The second part of the approach involves performing hand calculations to confirm the magnitude of the voltage spike and better understand the influence of each of the factors on the end result. These equations are second-order differential equations based on the model contrived in the first part of the study. Finally, the model is validated through the building and testing of physical samples. Experimental design and statistical analysis techniques are used to compare and optimize design options. This approach results in a cost-effective solution that uses standard components and has minimal effects on motor performance and other electrical requirements.
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    Nagarjuna Yagam · Shuvra Das
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    ABSTRACT: One of the main objectives of the automotive industry is to build more fuel efficient cars. The most dominant factor, among the many that determine fuel efficiency, is the weight of the vehicle. Any overall attempt to reduce weight involves all areas of the vehicle. Over the years the industry has addressed this need by developing new or modified materials and innovative production processes, combining these with one another and transforming them into viable production solutions. A very successful approach among the many things done is the use of structural metal adhesives, which have brought significant improvements in body shell rigidity and crash behavior. Traditionally, aluminum, steel and other metal parts were joined together with mechanical or thermal methods, such as rivets or resistance welding. But, structural adhesive is now an alternative that engineers consider very seriously. With any adhesive joint, the goal is to achieve as uniform a stress distribution as possible. The difference of structural and thermal properties between the base materials and the adhesives provide unique challenges in adhesive joint design. Adhesives fail by creep mechanisms that are time-dependent, while mechanical fasteners usually fail by fatigue mechanisms that are cycle-dependent. The objective of this paper is to present three-dimensional stress analysis of adhesive joints, which are placed under in-plane loads. Analysis of stresses at the joint interface reveals high levels of stress concentration, especially at the edges. These stress concentrations may be reduced by joint redesign. In this paper the simplest form of joint redesign, through the addition of fillets, is explored and its influence on changes in stress levels is reported.
    SAE World Congress 2006, Detroit, MI; 04/2006
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    A. Askari · S. Das
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    ABSTRACT: Structural failures by fracture in oil and petroleum industries can have severe consequences both in terms of loss of life and of economics. Material fabrication processes, such as welding and rolling, and plant environment, such as corrosive surroundings, lead to brittle fractures of oil and petroleum industry structures. Structures, such as pressure vessels, are constantly exposed to hydrogen in the presence of high pressure and moderate temperature. This leads to hydrogen embrittlement. Also, exposure to high pressure and temperature over time by itself ages the material, and leads to temper embrittlement. Hydrogen and temper embrittlements are the primary causes for brittle fracture. In this paper, the most common type of this complex interaction, namely that of the residual stresses in a welded thick wall pressure vessel subject to primary loading and exposed to an atmosphere that contains hydrogen at elevated temperature, is discussed and analyzed. A real case of a crack in a welded pressure vessel under high hydrogen partial pressure and moderate temperature is selected as a reference structure. A strategy that involves both modeling and use of data from previous experiments is established that can help in assessing the service life of such a structure that contains residual stress from processing, is cracked, and is exposed to a corrosive atmosphere.
    Journal of Materials Processing Technology 03/2006; 173(1):1–13. DOI:10.1016/j.jmatprotec.2004.12.005 · 2.04 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Mechatronics refers to the growing number of commercial products and industrial processes that involve the integrated application of mechanical and electrical engineering concepts. Despite the importance of this interdisciplinary area, many of today’s engineering graduates are unprepared to function competently in environments that require them to optimally integrate electrical and mechanical knowledge areas. In addition, engineers with better communication and teamwork skills are needed to ensure competitiveness in today’s global economy. In order to address this competency gap a team of faculty members (consisting of faculty from both ME and EE departments) started work in the late nineties with the help of National Science Foundation (NSF) funding to integrate Mechatronics-based activities at all levels of the undergraduate engineering curriculum at University of Detroit Mercy. The components of the first phase of the project were the development of a new senior level technical elective in introductory mechatronics, and the introduction of mechatronic activities in a freshman design course and in several pre-college programs that the school runs. After successful completion of the first phase just over three years ago, the faculty team received a second NSF grant to build on the earlier efforts by developing two new advanced courses in the area of Modeling & Simulation of Mechatronic Systems and in the area of Sensors & Actuators for Mechatronic Systems. This second phase involving the development and delivery of these two advanced courses in mechatronics has also been successfully completed. The third phase involves the creation of a Mechatronics area of concentration or minor at both the undergraduate and graduate levels and is ongoing. This paper will describe all aspects of this Mechatronics Curriculum Development effort including details of the different new courses developed, results from outcomes assessment conducted, the construction of a Mechatronics Curriculum, and future plans. In addition, we will also discuss the relevance and impact of such a curriculum on the education of engineers in the Americas.
    5th Annual ASEE Global Colloquium on Engineering Education., , Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; 01/2006
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    S. Das · M. Krishnan · S.A. Yost
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    ABSTRACT: Today, it is very important for engineering programs to have their traditional program streams vested with clearly identifiable themes for each concentration area within a program, and for each theme to have a clear connection with all of the associated course requirements of an area. Over the past seven years, three new courses in Mechatronics have been developed at the University of Detroit Mercy for both ME and EE students, through a collaborative effort between faculty from the Mechanical and Electrical Engineering Departments. These are "Introduction to Mechatronics", "Modeling and Simulation of Mechatronics Systems", and "Sensors and Actuators". Using these developments as a springboard, an effort is currently underway to investigate the formulation of a new undergraduate concentration area in Mechatronics as part of the Bachelor's Degree in Mechanical Engineering. This paper outlines the effort, including the difficulties associated with having to work within the constraints of an existing curricular framework in a small college
    Frontiers in Education, 2005. FIE '05. Proceedings 35th Annual Conference; 11/2005
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    ABSTRACT: Not Available
    Frontiers in Education, 2003. FIE 2003. 33rd Annual; 12/2003
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    Shuvra Das · Mathias Klotz · F Klocke
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    ABSTRACT: A finite element-based model for the electric discharge machining (EDM) process is presented. The model uses process parameters such as power input, pulse duration, etc., to predict the transient temperature distribution, liquid- and solid-state material transformation, and residual stresses that are induced in the workpiece as a result of a single-pulse discharge. An attractive feature of the model is its ability to predict the shape of the crater that is formed as a result of the material removal. The model has been validated using experimental data, wherever possible. Extending the model to simulate the effects of multiple pulses will be undertaken in the near future.
    Journal of Materials Processing Technology 11/2003; 142(2-142):434-451. DOI:10.1016/S0924-0136(03)00624-1 · 2.04 Impact Factor
  • Shuvra Das
    "Handbook of Aluminum." Physical Metallurgy and Processes. New York:, 1st edited by George, E. Totten, and D. Scott MacKenzie, 01/2003: chapter Residual Stress and Distortion: pages 305-349; Marcel Dekker Inc., ISBN: 0-8247-0494-0
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    ABSTRACT: The paper describes a comprehensive assessment plan that was carried out as part of an NSF-funded effort to integrate principles of mechatronics throughout the Mechanical and Electrical Engineering curricula at the University of Detroit Mercy. The project team consists of faculty members from three departments: Electrical and Computer Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, and Education. The focus of the article is a description of how the assessment results have been used to refine one curricular component of the project: the senior-level course in mechatronics. We present an overview of the project, a summary of the assessment framework, initial results of the formative assessment of the mechatronics course, and an evolving model of outcome based curriculum development
    Frontiers in Education Conference, 2000. FIE 2000. 30th Annual; 02/2000
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    Jonathan M. Weaver · Shuvra Das
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    ABSTRACT: The undergraduate mechanical engineering program at the University of Detroit Mercy(UDM) includes a required laboratory course in Mechanical Measurements. A recent NSF ILI grant made it possible to modernize ME361 by procuring four personal computers, data acquisition cards, Labview software, and many transducers and other needed items. All of the ME361 lab experiences were modernized as described in this paper.

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