Publications

  • Shahram Paydar, Hamid Reza Abbasi, Seyed Mohsen Mousavi
    The journal of trauma and acute care surgery. 05/2014; 76(5):1336.
  • Seyed Mohsen Mousavi, Jan Sundquist, Kari Hemminki
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract is missing (Short).
    Acta Dermato-Venereologica 11/2013;
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    Seyed Mohsen Mousavi, Asta Försti, Jan Sundquist, Kari Hemminki
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    ABSTRACT: Background. There are large geographic differences in breast cancer risk but whether survival differs between low- and high-risk groups is less well-established. As the survival of cancer depends on the level of healthcare and awareness of disease risks, subtle differences in cancer biology cannot be revealed in international comparisons. Instead, comparison of diverse immigrant groups in a country of uniformly accessible healthcare system should enable conclusions to be made about ethnic determinants of cancer risk and survival. Material and methods. The Swedish Family-Cancer Database was used to calculate standardized incidence (SIRs) and hazard ratios (HRs) of death from female breast cancer in 12 505 and 137 547 patients diagnosed with breast cancer among immigrants and Swedes, respectively. The ratios were adjusted for age, period, region, parity, and age at first childbirth. Ordinal logistic regression analysis was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) for the clinical TNM classes. The analyses were stratified by menopausal status and histology. Results. Turks, Southeast Asians, and Chileans had the lowest breast cancer risk (SIR = 0.44; 95% CI 0.37-0.51) and Iraqis the highest risk (1.19; 1.05-1.35), mainly due to premenopausal cancer (1.51; 1.27-1.78). The HRs for all breast cancers were between 0.98 (0.81-1.18) (low-risk Europeans) and 1.24 (0.94-1.63) (lowest-risk non-Europeans), but were not significant. No differences in survival of ductal carcinoma between immigrants and Swedes were found, while low-risk non-Europeans had a HR of 2.88 (1.37-6.08) for lobular carcinoma. Low-risk non-Europeans were diagnosed in a higher T-class (OR = 1.87; 1.21-2.87) than Swedes. Conclusion. We did not find any evidence that ethnic differences in breast cancer risk substantially affect the survival. The observed poor survival of some low-risk immigrants in lobular carcinoma may be related to treatment. The tendency of low-risk immigrants to present with higher T-class compared to Swedes may depend on their lower participation in the mammography screening program.
    Acta oncologica (Stockholm, Sweden) 01/2013; · 2.27 Impact Factor
  • Kari Hemminki, Donna P Ankerst, Jan Sundquist, Seyed Mohsen Mousavi
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    ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: The large international variation in the incidence of prostate cancer (PC) is well known but the underlying reasons are not understood. We want to compare PC incidence and survival among immigrants to Sweden in order to explain the international differences. METHODS: Cancer data were obtained from the Swedish Cancer Registry. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated for PC in first-degree immigrants by country of birth. The immigrants were classified into four groups by SIR and area of origin. Survival in PC was assessed by hazard ratio (HR) in the four groups. In some analyses, clinical stage of PC was assessed by the tumor, node, and metastasis classification. RESULTS: The SIR was 0.47 (95 % confidence interval 0.43-0.51) for immigrants with the lowest risk, constituting men from Turkey, Middle East, Asia, and Chile. The HR was 0.60 (0.45-0.81) for these men and it was 0.49 if they had stayed 20+ years in Sweden. The SIR in screening detected PC, T1c, was 0.55. Among these men, screening detected PC constituted 34.5 % of all PC, compared to 29.0 % among Swedes (p = 0.10). CONCLUSIONS: The results showed that the non-European immigrants, of mainly Middle East, Asian, and Chilean origin, with the lowest risk of PC, also had the most favorable survival in PC. As the available clinical features of PC at diagnosis or the distribution of known risk factors could not explain the differences, a likely biological mechanism through a favorable androgenic hormonal host environment is suggested as an explanation of the observed effects.
    World Journal of Urology 01/2013; · 2.89 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The clinical tumor-node-metastasis (T, N and M) classes of breast cancers provide important prognostic information. However, the possible association of TNM classes with reproductive factors has remained largely unexplored. Because every woman has a reproductive history, implications to outcome prediction are potentially significant. During the study period from 2002 through 2008, 5,614 pre- and 27,310 postmenopausal patients were identified in the Swedish Family-Cancer Database. Ordinal logistic regression analysis was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) for TNM classes of breast cancers by histology. The reproductive variables were parity, age at first and last childbirth and time interval between first and last childbirth. Among postmenopausal patients, the ORs for high-T class (T2-T4) (tumor size ≥2 cm) and metastasis were decreased by parity. A late age at first and last childbirth associated with high-T class and the effects were higher for lobular (OR for late age at first childbirth = 2.85) than ductal carcinoma. Overall, long time interval between first and last childbirth was related to high-T class and metastasis. However, a short time interval between first and last childbirth in patients with late age at first or last childbirth increased the risk of metastasis. Late age at last childbirth was associated with increased occurrence of lobular carcinoma in situ. Among premenopausal ductal carcinoma patients, nulliparity and early age at first childbirth were associated with high-T class. Increasing parity was protective against high-T class and metastasis; late ages at first and last childbirth were risk factors for high-T class in postmenopausal breast cancers. The current decline in parity and delayed age at first childbirth in many countries may negatively influence prognosis of breast cancer.
    PLoS ONE 01/2013; 8(5):e58867. · 3.53 Impact Factor
  • Journal of the American College of Surgeons 11/2012; 215(5):743-4. · 4.50 Impact Factor
  • Seyed Mohsen Mousavi, Jan Sundquist, Kari Hemminki
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    ABSTRACT: We compared the incidence of cancer among Turkish, Chilean, and North African (NA) first-generation immigrants with residents in their countries of origin and native Swedes. The Swedish Family-Cancer Database was used to calculate age-standardized incidence rates. We compared the age-standardized incidence rates for immigrants with those in the Cancer Incidence in Five Continents report. All-cancer rates were decreased in Turks (men) and Chileans and increased in NAs compared with the residents in their countries of origin. The rates of stomach cancer in Chileans and lung cancer in Turkish men were decreased, whereas Turkish women had an increased rate of lung cancer. Furthermore, the rate of prostate cancer in Turks and NAs and nervous system tumors in NA men and Turkish women were increased. Chileans had higher rates of stomach and testicular cancers and lower rates of colon cancer, nervous system tumors, and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma compared with Swedes. Higher rates of male lung cancer and female thyroid cancer, and lower rates of male rectal and kidney cancers and nervous system tumors, and female stomach and colon cancers were observed among Turks compared with Swedes. The differences observed in all-cancer rates among immigrants were mostly attributable to decreased rates of stomach and lung cancers or an increased rate of prostate cancer after migration. We observed increased rates of colon, breast, and nervous system cancers after migration, whereas the rates of testicular, kidney and thyroid cancers, and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma remained unchanged.
    European journal of cancer prevention: the official journal of the European Cancer Prevention Organisation (ECP) 09/2012; · 2.21 Impact Factor
  • Journal of the American College of Surgeons 09/2012; 215(3):444; author reply 444-5. · 4.50 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women worldwide and the leading cause of death from cancer among women. Evidence suggests that early diagnosis and screening interventions might help to improve outcomes. This population-based study was conducted to determine breast cancer awareness and screening behavior among Iranian women and to examine its association with women's literacy. The study was carried out in two provinces, with 1,477,045 population, located in central and eastern part of Iran. Overall, 770 women were studied. Of these, 482 (62.7%) were literate and 287 (37.3%) were not. The results obtained from the data analysis indicated that there was a significant difference between literate and illiterate women. Further analysis of the data using logistic regression showed that literacy was an important contributing factor for breast cancer prevention behavior. The findings suggest that in order to improve women's health and breast cancer outcomes providing equal educational opportunities for women seems necessary.
    Asian Pacific journal of cancer prevention: APJCP 08/2012; 13(8):3927-30. · 1.50 Impact Factor
  • Kari Hemminki, Jan Sundquist, Seyed Mohsen Mousavi
    The Breast Journal 06/2012; 18(4):392-3. · 1.83 Impact Factor
  • Shahram Paydar, Seyed Mohsen Mousavi, Ali Taheri Akerdi
    European journal of cardio-thoracic surgery: official journal of the European Association for Cardio-thoracic Surgery 01/2012; 42(1):192. · 2.40 Impact Factor
  • Seyed Mohsen Mousavi, Kristina Sundquist, Kari Hemminki
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    ABSTRACT: We wanted to define lung cancer incidence rates by histological subtype among immigrants in Sweden to explore the effect of new environments on the incidence of lung cancer by histological subtype in different ethnic populations. The nationwide Swedish Family-Cancer Database w used to calculate age-standardized incidence rates (ASR) (per 100,000) and standardized incidence ratios (SIRs). The patient series covered 19,255 male and 14,601 female Swedes, and 3236 male and 1751 female immigrants. By time since immigration, Former Yugoslavian (ASR=46.4) and Asian Arab (38.8) men, and Danish (23.3), Norwegian (19.5) and Finnish (14.5) women had the highest rates for lung cancer, while the lowest rate was seen among Asian Arab women (5.8). The highest adenocarcinoma rates were seen among South European men (11.5), and Danish (7.4) and Norwegian (6.9) women, while squamous cell (SCC) and small cell carcinomas rates were the highest among former Yugoslavian (16.0) and Baltic (8.8) men, respectively. Former Yugoslavian men (2.6) had the highest rate for large cell carcinoma. Compared to Swedes, former Yugoslavian men had the highest significant risk for SCC (SIR=3.62), small cell (3.14) and large cell (4.21) carcinomas, whereas the highest adenocarcinoma risk was seen among Asian Arabs (2.35). Danish women had the highest risks for SCC (1.91) and small cell carcinoma (2.56). The ethnic-specific lung cancer rates by histology followed the rates in the countries of origin. Our findings may suggest that preservation of smoking habits in the host country is linked to the ethnic diversity of lung cancer incidence by histology.
    Lung cancer (Amsterdam, Netherlands) 11/2011; 76(2):159-64. · 3.14 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To examine the role of gender, age at immigration and length of stay on incidence trends of common cancers, we studied risk of colorectal, lung, breast and prostate cancers in immigrants to Sweden from 1958 to 2008. The nationwide Swedish Family-Cancer Database was used to calculate standardized incidence ratios for common cancers among immigrants compared to Swedes. Immigrants were classified into "high-risk" countries when their risk was increased, into "low-risk" when their risk was decreased and into "other" when their risk was nonsignificant. Among those who immigrated at younger age (<30 years), we found an increasing trend for colorectal cancer risk in low-risk men and high-risk women. Among those who immigrated at older age (≥ 30 years), a decreasing lung cancer risk in high-risk men and an increasing breast cancer risk in low-risk women were observed. The increasing trend of prostate cancer risk was independent of age at immigration. The risk trends for "other" immigrants were between the risks of low- and high-risk countries. The gender-specific shifts in cancer risks in immigrants toward the risk in natives indicate a major role of sex, age at immigration and environmental exposures in colorectal and lung cancers risks. In contrast, the unchanged trend of breast cancer among those who immigrated at younger ages and an increasing trend for those who migrated at older ages may suggest a limited effect for environmental exposures, especially at younger age. Our study points out a role of age at immigration on the risk trend of cancer.
    International Journal of Cancer 11/2011; 131(2):E122-8. · 6.20 Impact Factor
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    Seyed Mohsen Mousavi, Kristina Sundquist, Kari Hemminki
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    ABSTRACT: The observed increased risks of noncardia stomach cancer among foreign-born second-generation immigrants compared to the Swedes suggest that these immigrants were infected by Helicobacter pylori before immigration.
    Gastric Cancer 10/2011; 15(2):213-5. · 3.99 Impact Factor
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    Seyed Mohsen Mousavi, Kristina Sundquist, Kari Hemminki
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    ABSTRACT: We studied the effect of new environment on the risk in and mortality of gynecological cancers in first- and second-generation immigrants in Sweden. We used the nationwide Swedish Family-Cancer Database to calculate standardized incidence/mortality ratios (SIRs/SMRs) of cervical, endometrial and ovarian cancers among immigrants in comparison to the native Swedes. Risk of cervical cancer increased among first-generation immigrants with Danish (SIR = 1.64), Norwegian (1.33), former Yugoslavian (1.21) and East European (1.35) origins, whereas this risk decreased among Finns (0.88) and Asians (SIRs varies from 0.11 in Iranians to 0.54 in East Asians). Risk of endometrial (SIRs varies from 0.28 in Africans to 0.86 in Finns) and ovarian (SIRs varies from 0.23 in Chileans to 0.82 in Finns) cancers decreased in first-generation immigrants. The overall gynecological cancer risk for the second-generation immigrants, independent of the birth region, was almost similar to that obtained for the first generations. The birth region-specific SMRs of gynecological cancers in first- and second-generation immigrants co-varied with the SIRs. Risk of gynecological cancers among the first-generation immigrants is similar to that in their original countries, except for cervical cancer among Africans and endometrial cancer among North Americans and East Europeans. Our findings show that risk and mortality of gynecological cancers observed in the first-generation immigrants remain in the second generation. We conclude that the risk and protective factors of gynecological cancers are preserved upon immigration and through generations, suggesting a role for behavioral factors or familial aggregation in the etiology of these diseases.
    International Journal of Cancer 08/2011; 131(2):497-504. · 6.20 Impact Factor
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    Seyed Mohsen Mousavi, Jan Sundquist, Kari Hemminki
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    ABSTRACT: The observed increased risks of gastric cancer among first-generation immigrants compared to those in Swedes suggest the role of childhood environmental exposure in the risk of this disease.
    Gastric Cancer 03/2011; 14(3):285-9. · 3.99 Impact Factor
  • Seyed Mohsen Mousavi, Andreas Brandt, Jan Sundquist, Kari Hemminki
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    ABSTRACT: Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma is linked to alcohol drinking, whereas esophageal adenocarcinoma risk is increased by overweight and obesity. Both histologies are directly related to tobacco smoking. We wanted to define the risk of esophageal cancer by histology and length of stay among immigrants in Sweden. The nationwide Swedish Family Cancer database (2010 version: data on cancers originate from the nationwide Swedish Cancer Registry) was used to calculate standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) for esophageal cancer among immigrants compared with the native Swedes. SIRs for lung cancer were also calculated as a proxy for smoking prevalence. The patient series covered 5930 male and 1998 female Swedes, and 410 and 198 immigrants. The risk of esophageal cancer was increased in female Finns (SIR=1.66), Britons (3.73), and Southeast Africans (5.26), whereas male Baltic (0.44), former Yugoslavian (0.47), other Europeans (0.58), and other Asians (0.52) showed a decreased risk. The risk of squamous cell carcinoma was increased among Finns (men=1.32, women=1.90) and Iranian women (3.80), whereas Danish men (1.66) had an increased risk of adenocarcinoma. No trend was observed for the risks in immigrants according to the length of stay. We found no covariation between the birth region-specific SIRs for squamous cell carcinoma and lung cancer. Early childhood exposures or preservation of original habits might be the main environmental exposures influencing squamous cell carcinoma risks in some immigrants. The increased risk of adenocarcinoma among Danish men may confirm the role of obesity in adenocarcinoma risk.
    European journal of cancer prevention: the official journal of the European Cancer Prevention Organisation (ECP) 03/2011; 20(2):71-6. · 2.21 Impact Factor
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    Kari Hemminki, Seyed Mohsen Mousavi, Jan Sundquist, Andreas Brandt
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    ABSTRACT: Age-specific incidence rates for breast cancer in low-risk and high-risk ethnic populations differ by age at which the incidence maximum is reached: around 50 years in low-risk populations and over 60 years in high-risk populations. The interpretation of these differences remains unsettled, one line primarily referring to biological differences, the second one to cohort effects of rapidly increasing rates in young populations, and the third one to incomplete registration of cancer in the elderly. The nationwide Family-Cancer Database was used to analyze standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) and age at diagnosis of breast cancer in female immigrants to Sweden by their region of origin compared with women native to Sweden matched on birth year and other relevant factors. We showed first that the SIRs for breast cancer were lower in many immigrant groups compared with natives of Sweden; women from Turkey had the lowest SIR of 0.45, followed by those from Chile (0.54) and Southeast Asia (0.57). Women from nine regions showed an earlier mean age at diagnosis than their matched Swedish controls, the largest differences being 5.5 years for women from Turkey, 5.1 years for those from Asian Arab and "Other African" countries, 4.3 years for those from Iran, and 4.0 years for those from Iraq. The results show that in many immigrant groups, the diagnostic age is earlier (<50 years) than in natives of Sweden (>50 years), suggesting that true biological factors underlie the differences. These factors may explain much of the international variation in breast cancer incidence. Identifying these factors should advance understanding of breast cancer etiology and prevention.
    The Oncologist 01/2011; 16(2):146-54. · 4.10 Impact Factor
  • Seyed Mohsen Mousavi, Vahid Johari Majd
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    ABSTRACT: This paper addresses robust H∞ filtering problem for a nonlinear genetic regulatory network (GRN), which is extended to include noise and disturbances, parameter uncertainties, and time-varying delays simultaneously. It is assumed that the nonlinear function that describes the feedback regulation satisfies the sector-bounded condition, the stochastic state perturbation is in the form of a scalar Brownian motion, and the time-varying delays enter into both the translation process and the feedback regulation process. To account for the unavoidable modeling errors and parameter fluctuations, the network parameters are assumed to be time-varying but norm-bounded values. We aim to estimate the true concentrations of mRNAs and proteins by designing a linear filter such that, for all admissible uncertainties, nonlinearities, stochastic perturbations and time delays, the dynamics of the filtering error is guaranteed to be robustly asymptotically stable in the mean square sense while achieving the prescribed H∞ disturbance attenuation level. By using the Lyapunov stability theory and Itoˆ formula, sufficient conditions for the existence of the filter are obtained in the form of a linear matrix inequality (LMI). Then, explicit expressions for the desired filter gains are provided. Finally, a simulation example is given in order to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed design procedure.
    Neurocomputing. 01/2011; 74:2123-2134.
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    Seyed Mohsen Mousavi, Andreas Brandt, Jan Sundquist, Kari Hemminki
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    ABSTRACT: Previous studies have indicated that ionizing radiation, particularly during childhood, is the main established risk factor for thyroid cancer. History of benign nodules/adenoma, goiter, iodine deficiency or high-iodine intake might be other associated factors. We wanted to define the histology-specific thyroid cancer risk in the first-generation immigrants to Sweden. We used the 2010 update of the nation-wide Swedish Family-Cancer Database (>12 million individuals; 1.8 million immigrants; histology code in force since 1958) to calculate standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) for histology-specific thyroid cancer among immigrants compared to the native Swedes. The patient series covered 2,604 male and 6,406 female Swedes, and 247 and 863 immigrants. The median age at immigration was 29 years, and the median age at thyroid cancer diagnosis was 46 years. Increased risks for female papillary carcinoma were observed for Finns (SIR = 1.63), former Yugoslavians (2.36), Russians (2.34), other East Europeans (2.14), Turks (3.16), Iranians (2.68), Iraqis (2.77), East and Southeast Asians (2.92), other Asians (1.69) and South Americans (2.23). Male Iranians (2.85), East and Southeast Asians (3.57) and other Asians (2.26) had an increased risk for papillary carcinoma. Only male East and Southeast Asians (2.93) had an increased risk for follicular carcinoma. The data might suggest that immigrant populations in Sweden from areas of low or high-iodine intake are at risk of papillary carcinoma, implicating iodine imbalance as a contributing factor to our findings. The increased risk of thyroid cancer among Asian immigrants may confirm the role of childhood-ionizing radiation on thyroid cancer risk.
    International Journal of Cancer 12/2010; 129(9):2248-55. · 6.20 Impact Factor

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