R. S. Chauhan

Ph. D
TRP & OIC Medicinal and Aromatic Plants
Uttarakhand University of Hort... · Medicinal & Aromatic Plants

Publications

  • Rajendra S. Chauhan, M. C. Nautiyal, Aldo Tava
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    ABSTRACT: Selinum vaginatum C.B. Clarke. (Apiaceae) was collected from two distant populations of north-west Himalaya, India. Underground parts were subjected to hydro distillation in a Clevenger-type apparatus and 0.24-0.27 % essential oil could collect. Twenty eight constituent from the volatile part was identified with GC-FID and GC-MS analysis. Great variations exist in qualitative and quantitative parameters of the essential oil. The study revealed that only nine constituents were common to both populations. Bornyl acetate was major constituents (31-51 %) of the essential oil in both the populations. Second major constituent was α-pinene from Rhohtang whereas β-phellandrene was second major constituents from Tungnath. Existing variations in the essential oil composition may be attributed to environmental factors as well genetic makeup. Such variations are important for assessment of genetic variability and crop improvement program of species.
    Journal of essential oil-bearing plants JEOP 09/2014; 17(5). · 0.19 Impact Factor
  • NATIONAL CONFERENCE ON ENVIRONMENTAL CONSTRAINTS, CONSERVATION AND RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT OF MEDICINAL PLANTS FOR HEALTH & SOCIETAL BENEFITS March 21-23, 2014, Dehradun; 03/2014
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  • R. S. Chauhan
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    ABSTRACT: Population survey was carried out on few medicinal and aromatic plant species (MAPs) in their natural habitats in western Himalaya, India. Vegetation sampling was conducted through vertical belt transect method in the areas of occurrence of the selected species using quadrat method. Anthropogenic factors e.g. grazing and destructive harvesting are major threat for population reduction in most of the selected species in study sites. Factors responsible for population reduction and methods for their conservation were discussed. Such rare, endangered and threatened MAPs should be conserved through both in situ and ex situ methods.
    Journal of Medicinal Plants 01/2014; 6(2):94-99.
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    R.S. Chauhan, M.C. Nautiyal, A. Tava, R. Cecotti
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    ABSTRACT: Heracleum candicans Wall. (Apiaceae) is an important endangered aromatic species, exploited commercially with a destructive harvesting system from its natural habitat. We cultivated a wild strain of H. candicans, harvested leaves for extraction of essential oil and analyzed them. Twenty-eight compounds were identified from essential oil using gas chromatography–flame ionization detection (GC–FID) and GC–mass spectrometry (GC–MS) analysis. These compounds are very useful for the pharmaceutical, flavor and fragrance industries. Harvesting of the leaves for the production of essential oil is a sustainable method compared with uprooting plants. Being a perennial species, leaves can be harvested every year, as the aerial parts of the plant regenerate easily and farmers need not worry about planting every year.
    Journal of Essential Oil Research 01/2014; 26(2). · 0.82 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Dactylorhiza hatagirea (D. Don) Soo (Orchidaceae) is an important endangered medicinal herb, distributed in subalpine to alpine regions of the Himalayas. Its tubers are important constituents of many medicines and health tonics. Overexploitation for medicinal uses has decreased availability in natural habitats and this species has been enlisted as endangered, making conservation and cultivation studies necessary. Variability studies may serve as an important tool for effective conservation and for a crop improvement program. Therefore, natural populations of D. hatagirea were analyzed for variability on the basis of morphological, biochemical, and isoenzyme patterns. The studied populations were grouped into two clusters. Existing variability among different populations opens up new areas for conservation and perspectives for a genetic improvement program for D. hatagirea.
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    R.S. Chauhan, M.C. Nautiyal, Aldo Tava
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    ABSTRACT: Uttarakhand has been declared ‘Herbal State’, but herbal wealth of this state could not be utilized properly due to lack of chemical characterization of most of the vegetational wealth. Mentha spicata L. (spearmint) was collected from naturally growing population of Uttarakhand (3800 ft). GC-MS analysis reveals details of 94.0 % of essential oil. Carvone was major part (57.1 %) whereas other components were limonene (10.1 %), cis-dihydrocarvone (3.2 %), dihydrocarveol (3.2 %).
    Journal of essential oil-bearing plants JEOP 03/2013; 13(3):353-356. · 0.19 Impact Factor
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    V. K. Purohit, Y.M. Bahuguna, D. Tewari, A. Tewari, H. C. Andola, J. S. Negi and R.S. Chauhan
    Current science 01/2013; 104(2):161-162. · 0.83 Impact Factor
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    R S Chauhan, B P Nautiyal, M C Nautiyal
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    ABSTRACT: This is a research/review paper, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 3.0 Unported License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/), permitting all non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction inany medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Abstract -Collection and trade of medicinal and aromatic plant species (MAPs) is age old practice throughout the world to increase household income. Over harvesting decreased their populations and a number of species became threatened in natural habitat. Survey was conducted on trade of such threatened MAPs from wild in Garhwal Himalaya (Uttarakhand), India. Information's were collected on MAPs trade, channels involved and profit at each level of transaction. Even after ban on commercial exploitation of some MAPs, trade continued through illegal ways. Harvesting starts from July and continue till November. Further, harvesting prior to seed dispersal decreased chance of recruitment of new individual, due to which abundance of these species is decreasing with alarming rate. Abstract -Collection and trade of medicinal and aromatic plant species (MAPs) is age old practice throughout the world to increase household income. Over harvesting decreased their populations and a number of species became threatened in natural habitat. Survey was conducted on trade of such threatened MAPs from wild in Garhwal Himalaya (Uttarakhand), India. Information's were collected on MAPs trade, channels involved and profit at each level of transaction. Even after ban on commercial exploitation of some MAPs, trade continued through illegal ways. Harvesting starts from July and continue till November. Further, harvesting prior to seed dispersal decreased chance of recruitment of new individual, due to which abundance of these species is decreasing with alarming rate. Total eighteen species are in active trade from study areas, out of which five are common for all sites. Number of MAPs traded from each site directly influenced by abundance of species in natural habitat. 18% of annual cash income generated from MAPs related activities in these areas. Market demand for Aconitum heterophyllum, Nardostachys jatamansi and Picrorhiza kurrooa is much higher than supply. Percentage of profit varied at each level from site to site and species. Traders earned maximum percentage of profits whereas collectors also received good profit, due to which they were engaged in illegal trade. Rotational harvesting may be applied for sustainable utilization. Agrotechnology has been developed for few MAPs, but incentive should be given to farmers to initiate cultivation of such species for ex situ conservation. channels, rotational harvest, sustainable utilization.
    01/2013;
  • Chemistry of Natural Compounds 11/2012; 48,(5):901-902. · 0.60 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Morina longifolia Wall. ex DC. is an important aromatic plant that is also well-known in ethnomedicine in the Himalayan region. The aerial parts of the plant were collected during the flowering stage and steam distilled in order to characterize the essential oil composition. Thirty-three compounds constituting 94.2% of the total volatiles were identified using gas chromatography–flame ionization detection (GC–FID) and GC–mass spectrometry (GC–MS). The major constituent of the volatile fraction was β-myrcene (42.5%), whereas other important constituents were bicyclogermacrene (8.9%), germacrene D (6.7%) and limonene (6.3%). The characterization of the essential oil might help out to establish new potential applications for this species, both as herbal supplement and as fragrance agent.
    Journal of Essential Oil Research 10/2012; 24 (5), 461-463(5):461-463. · 0.82 Impact Factor
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    Rajendra S. Chauhan, Mohan C. Nautiyal, Aldo Tava, Mariella Mella
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    ABSTRACT: The essential oil from the underground parts of Selinum tenuifoliumWall. (Apiaceae) was extracted by hydrodistillation using a Clevenger-type apparatus, and analyzed by GC/FID and GC/MS. Nine constituents, representing 97.7% of the total oil, were identified, five of which belong to the class of polyacetylenes. The structures of the compounds 1–5 were elucidated by using IR, MS, and 1H- and 13C-NMR data after purification by column chromatography. The major constituent detected was nona-3,5-diyne (1; 85.6% of the total volatiles), followed by nona-3,5-diyn-2-one (2), nona-4,6-diyn-3-one (3), nona-3,5-diyn-2-ol (4), and nona-4,6-diyn-3-ol (5), accounting for 3.0, 2.5, 2.2, and 3.1% of the total volatiles, respectively. The latter four polyacetylenes, 2–5, were never reported in plants so far, and, therefore should be regarded as novel compounds.
    Helvetica Chimica Acta 05/2012; 95(5). · 1.39 Impact Factor
  • R.S. Chauhan and Prabhu Dutt
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    ABSTRACT: Medicinal properties of mangiferin, amaroswerin and amarogentin from genus Swertia are well documented. Collection of S. chirayita is strictly prohibited due to critically endangered status. Therefore, new source of these medicinal compounds is necessary for regular supply in market to combat various diseases. To identify new source of mangiferin, amaroswerin and amarogentin several plant species were screened. S. alternifolia showed presence of C-glucoxanthone mangiferin along with bitter secoiridoid glucosides (amaroswerin and amarogentin). As S. chirayita had been banned for collection due to rarity in nature, S. alternifolia can be used as an alternate source of mangiferin, amaroswerin and amarogentin for medicinal use.
    Journal of Natural Products 01/2012; 2, 104-109:104-109. · 3.95 Impact Factor
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    Current science 01/2012; 103 (3), 251-252. · 0.83 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The essential oil from the underground parts of Selinum tenuifoliumWall. (Apiaceae) was extracted by hydrodistillation using a Clevenger-type apparatus, and analyzed by GC/FID and GC/MS. Nine constituents, representing 97.7% of the total oil, were identified, five of which belong to the class of polyacetylenes. The structures of the compounds 1 – 5 were elucidated by using IR, MS, and 1H- and 13C-NMR data after purification by column chromatography. The major constituent detected was nona- 3,5-diyne (1; 85.6% of the total volatiles), followed by nona-3,5-diyn-2-one (2), nona-4,6-diyn-3-one (3), nona-3,5-diyn-2-ol (4), and nona-4,6-diyn-3-ol (5), accounting for 3.0, 2.5, 2.2, and 3.1% of the total volatiles, respectively. The latter four polyacetylenes, 2 – 5, were never reported in plants so far, and, therefore should be regarded as novel compounds.
    Helvetica Chimica Acta 01/2012; 95:780-787. · 1.39 Impact Factor
  • R.S. Chauhan and Prabhu Dutt
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    ABSTRACT: Swertia anguistifolia Ham. is an important medicinal plant of family Gentianaceae, distributed in subtropical to temperate Himalaya. The species is adulterant of S. chirayita and useful in ethnomedicinal system. Mature plants were collected at flowering stage, air dried, crushed to make extracts. Samples were investigated for the presence of biologically active molecules. Samples of S. anguistifolia collected from four different populations’ revealed presence of mangiferin and amaroswerin whereas amarogentin were completely absent. Concentration of mangiferin and amaroswerin varied from population to population.
    Phytomedicine 01/2012; 4 (2), 94-97:94-97. · 2.88 Impact Factor

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