Publications

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    ABSTRACT: Several analyses of diversity through geological time use global, synoptic databases, and this practice often makes it difficult to distinguish true signals in changing diversity from regional-scale sampling and/or geological artefacts. Here we investigate how echinoid diversity changed through the Mesozoic of the Lusitanian basin in Portugal based on a comprehensive, revised database, and seek to distinguish biological signal from geological or environmental constraints. The observed diversity pattern is far from having a defined trend, showing many fluctuations that appear to be linked with gaps in the geological record. This study revealed that, independently of the method used, whether correlation tests or model fitting, the diversity signal is not completely explained by the studied sampling proxies. Among the different proxies, marine facies variation in combination with outcrop area best explains the palaeodiversity curve.
    Palaeogeography Palaeoclimatology Palaeoecology 02/2015; 424. DOI:10.1016/j.palaeo.2015.02.014 · 2.75 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A new elasmosaurid from the early Maastrichtian of Angola and the implications of girdle morphology on swimming style in plesiosaurs.
    Geologie en Mijnbouw 02/2015; DOI:10.1017/njg.2014.44 · 0.82 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: ABSTRACT Stable oxygen isotope values of inoceramid marine bivalve shells recovered from Bentiaba, Angola, are utilised as a proxy for paleotemperatures during the Late Cretaceous development of the African margin of the South Atlantic Ocean. The δ18O values derived from inoceramids show a long-term increase from –3.2‰ in the Late Turonian to values between –0.8 and –1.8‰ in the Late Campanian. Assuming a constant oceanic δ18O value, an ∼2‰ increase may reflect cooling of the shallow marine environment at Bentiaba by approximately 10°. Bentiaba values are offset by about +1‰ from published records for bathyal Inoceramus at Walvis Ridge. This offset in δ18O values suggests a temperature difference of ∼5° between coastal and deeper water offshore Angola. Cooler temperatures implied by the δ18O curve at Bentiaba coincide with the stratigraphic distribution of diverse marine amniotes, including mosasaurs, at Bentiaba.
    01/2015; FirstView:1-7. DOI:10.1017/njg.2015.1
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    ABSTRACT: Russo J., Mateus O., Marzola M., & Balbino A. 2014. Eggs and eggshells of Crocodylomorpha from the Late Jurassic of Portugal. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, Program and Abstracts, 2014, p. 218.
    Society of Vertebrate Paleontology, November 5-8th, Estrel Berlin; 11/2014
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    Society of Vertebrate Palentology, November 5-8th, Estrel Berlin; 11/2014
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    ABSTRACT: Marzola M., Mateus O., Schulp A.S., Jacobs L.L., Polcyn M.J., & Pervov V. 2014. Early Cretaceous tracks of a large mammaliamorph, a crocodilomorph, and dinosaurs from an Angolan diamond mine. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, Program and Abstracts, 2014, p. 181. *Selected as featured abstract for the 2014 SVP Meeting
    Society of Vertebrate Paleontology, November 5-8th, Estrel Berlin; 11/2014
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    ABSTRACT: The current study aims to conciliate conservation and restoration museology diagnosis with paleontological and geological curational needs and has, as subject of study, dinosaur footprints (vertebrates fossils). The footprints have been being exposed since 2004 in the paleontology hall of the Museum of Lourinhã, Portugal, and are part of a important paleontological collection of Late Jurassic vertebrate fossils from Lourinhã Formation. Presently, it is considered a unique heritage in danger of disappearing due to high decay level of disaggregation of its geological structure. The dinosaur footprints, (ML557) found, more precisely, on a coastline cliff in Lourinhã, Porto das Barcas, Lagido do Forno (coordinate 39 • 14. 178'N, 9 • 20. 397'W), Jurassic period, on the 5th of June 2001, by Jesper Milàn. This cliff of high slope presents sedimentary stratigraphic characteristics of a sandstone/siltstone of gray and red colors, by the '' Munsell scale and Color Chart " . Geological the tracks are Late Jurassic in age, and colected in the Lourinhã Formation, Praia Azul Member, of the Lusitanian Basin. There are three natural infills tridactyl tracks, possibly ascribed to ornithopod, a bipedal herbivore, resultant of a left foot movement, right and left. Footprints have 300-400mm of wide and 330-360mm of height with round fingers, which are elongated due to some degradation/erosion. In 2001, the footprints were collected from the field, cleaned, consolidated and glued in the laboratory of the Museum of Lourinhã before being exhibited in a museum display. Stone matrix was removed and a consolidation product applied, probably a polyvinyl acetate, of the brand Plexigum. The footprint with broken central digit was glued with an epoxy resin, Araldite. Both applied products were confirmed by analysis of µ-FTIR (Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy) and both presented colour change and detachment surface problems. After collecting and storing, in 2004, footprints were transferred to the current public paleontology hall, ground floor, placed on the floor without any protection framework or environmental control (temperature and relative humidity). Presently, footprints show major geological structure disintegration/deterioration problems and were diagnosed several pathologies :"Blistering", "Powdering", "Exfoliation"' as well as " Dirt", "Fracture"', "Inscriptions", "Consolidates" and "Adhesives". Several laboratorial analysed were conducted to evaluate the presence of salts. Moreover a microclimatic study was conducted inside the museum to evaluate the influence of thermohygrometric parameters on the decay processes observed. As future procedures, all tracks will suffer a superficial cleaning (dust removal) with brush without any solvent and also the application of a consolidant aiming to restore some coehesion of these footprints. Since stone consolidation is a very risky intervention, several laboratory tests are being conducted with stone samples taken from the same layer and location from Porto das Barcas and using different commercial consolidation products.
    EGU General Assembly 2014; 10/2014
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    Adam S. Smith, Ricardo Araújo, Octávio Mateus
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    ABSTRACT: O. 2012. A new plesiosauroid from the Toarcian (Lower Jurassic) of Alhadas, Portu− gal. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica 57 (2): 257–266. A partial plesiosauroid skull from the São Gião Formation (Toarcian, Lower Jurassic) of Alhadas, Portugal is re−evalu− ated and described as a new taxon, Lusonectes sauvagei gen. et sp. nov. It has a single autapomorphy, a broad triangular parasphenoid cultriform process that is as long as the posterior interpterygoid vacuities, and also a unique character com− bination, including a jugal that contacts the orbital margin, a distinct parasphenoid–basisphenoid suture exposed between the posterior interpterygoid vacuities, lack of an anterior interpterygoid vacuity, and striations on the ventral surface of the pterygoids. Phylogenetic analysis of Jurassic plesiosauroids places Lusonectes as outgroup to "microcleidid elasmo− saurs", equivalent to the clade Plesiosauridae. Lusonectes sauvagei is the only diagnostic plesiosaur from Portugal, and the westernmost occurrence of any plesiosaurian in Europe.
    Acta Palaeontologica Polonica 10/2014; DOI:10.4202/app.2011.0023 · 1.72 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Machimosaurus was a large-bodied genus of teleosaurid crocodylomorph, considered to have been durophagous/chelonivorous, and which frequented coastal marine/estuarine ecosystems during the Late Jurassic. Here, we revise the genus based on previously described specimens and revise the species within this genus. We conclude that there were three European Machimosaurus species and another taxon in Ethiopia. This conclusion is based on numerous lines of evidence: craniomandibular, dental and postcranial morphologies; differences in estimated total body length; geological age; geographical distribution; and hypothetical lifestyle. We re-diagnose the type species Machimosaurus hugii and limit referred specimens to only those from Upper Kimmeridgian–Lower Tithonian of Switzerland, Portugal and Spain. We also re-diagnose Machimosaurus mosae, demonstrate that it is an available name and restrict the species to the uppermost Kimmeridgian–lowermost Tithonian of northeastern France. We re-diagnose and validate the species Machimosaurus nowackianus from Harrar, Ethiopia. Finally, we establish a new species, Machimosaurus buffetauti, for the Lower Kimmeridgian specimens of France and Germany (and possibly England and Poland). We hypothesize that Machimosaurus may have been analogous to the Pliocene–Holocene genus Crocodylus in having one large-bodied taxon suited to traversing marine barriers and additional, geographically limited taxa across its range.
    10/2014; DOI:10.1098/rsos.140222
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    Octávio Mateus, Marco Marzola
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    ABSTRACT: Mateus O, & Marzola M. 2014. Dinosaur taphonomy in the Lourinhã Formation (Late Jurassic, Portugal). p. 60-61. In: Bassi D, Posenato R (Eds). Abstract book of the 7th International Meeting on Taphonomy and Fossilization, Taphos 2014, Ferrara, September 10th-13th. Annali dell’Università di Ferrara, Sez. Fisica e Scienze della Terra, volume speciale. The Upper Jurassic Lourinhã Formation is known by the richness in vertebrate specimens, mostly dinosaurs, mainly in the middle section of the formation, i.e. within or close to the Porto Novo and Praia Azul Members. The bone preservation in the upper part of the formation (Assenta and Santa Rita Mbs.) are rarer, maybe due to geochemical conditions (i.e., pH) unfavorable to bone fossilization. These condition may resulted of the paleoenvironment: less confined channel in more distal delta position, which induced more fluid circulation. [...]
    7th International Meeting on Taphonomy and Fossilization, Taphos 2014, Ferrara, Italy; 09/2014
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    ABSTRACT: Eggshells from three extant crocodilian species – Crocodylus mindorensis, Paleosuchus palpebrosus, and Alligator mississippiensis – has been analyzed and described. A comparison between these and other extant and fossil crocodilian eggs showed that the egg external surface ornamentation may vary between the anastomo– and the ramotuberculate (sensu Carpenter 1999) types, and the newly described rugosocavate type, characterized by an irregularly rugose surface scattered by subcircular pits that not always correspond to pore openings (Marzola et al. 2014). [...]
    XII EAVP Meeting, 2014, Museo Regionale di Scienze Naturali, Regione Piemonte, Torino; 06/2014
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    Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology 06/2014; 34(4). DOI:10.1080/02724634.2014.840310 · 2.08 Impact Factor
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    Octávio Mateus, Philip D. Mannion, Paul Upchurch
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    ABSTRACT: Here we describe a new partial sauropod skeleton from the late Kimmeridgian (Late Jurassic) of the Lourinhã Formation, central west Portugal. The closely associated specimen comprises a complete tooth (with root), a fragment of cervical neural arch, an anterior chevron, and an almost complete right pectoral girdle and forelimb. The new sauropod, Zby atlanticus, n. gen. et sp., can be diagnosed on the basis of four autapomorphies, including a prominent posteriorly projecting ridge on the humerus at the level of the deltopectoral crest. Nearly all anatomical features indicate that Zby is a non-neosauropod eusauropod. On the basis of several characters, including tooth morphology, extreme anteroposterior compression of the proximal end of the radius, and strong beveling of the lateral half of the distal end of the radius, Zby appears to be closely related to Turiasaurus riodevensis from approximately contemporaneous deposits in eastern Spain. However, these two genera can be distinguished from each other by a number of features pertaining to the forelimb. Whereas previously described Late Jurassic Portuguese sauropods show close relationships with taxa from the contemporaneous Morrison Formation of North America, it appears that turiasaurians were restricted to Europe. All adult sauropods recovered in the Late Jurassic of Portugal thus far are very large individuals: it is possible that the apparent absence of small- or medium-sized adult sauropods might be related to the occupation of lower-browsing niches by non-sauropods such as the long-necked stegosaur Miragaia longicollum.
    Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology 05/2014; 34(3). DOI:10.1080/02724634.2013.822875 · 2.08 Impact Factor
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    Dataset: Text S1
    Christophe Hendrickx, Octávio Mateus
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    Dataset: Table S1
    Christophe Hendrickx, Octávio Mateus
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