Nicolas Guéguen

PhD
Professor (Full)
Université de Bretagne Sud · Institut de Management de Bretagne Sud (IMABS)

Publications

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    ABSTRACT: For more than fifty years, research in psychology has demonstrated that our evaluation of others may be influenced by their surname or first name. In this study, we evaluated the impact of the attractiveness and frequency of names in situations of recruitment for low qualification level jobs. Using data from a recruitment agency, we tested (binomial regression) for effects associated with first name popularity, surname frequency, first name + surname attractiveness, ethnicity, gender, and age on job interview outcome of 507 low qualified French persons. The logistic regression analysis indicated that, among the various variables tested, first name popularity remained the best predictor of employability.
    Names A Journal of Onomastics 12/2014; 62(4):218-224. · 0.11 Impact Factor
  • Nicolas Guéguen
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    ABSTRACT: We tested the Door-in-the-Face technique (DITF) on blood donation with a delay between the acceptance of the request and the real possibility of complying with it. University students were solicited to give blood during a special one-day drive. After the refusal to participate in a long-term donor program, participants were asked for a one unit blood donation. In the control condition, only the latter request was addressed. The participants were either solicited two or three hours before the blood drive (delay) or during the blood drive (no delay). Results showed the DITF technique to be associated with greater verbal compliance with the request. However, the DITF technique with no delay was associated with greater behavioral compliance than were both of the control conditions and the DITF with a delay condition.
    The Journal of psychology. 09/2014; 148(5):569-76.
  • Nicolas Guéguen
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    ABSTRACT: -Prior research on the effect of commitment on bystander intervention has focused on situations involving crime (e.g., robbery). However, the effect of commitment on less problematic situations has never been examined. In this field study, a female confederate asked (commitment condition) or did not ask (no-commitment condition) a customer to keep an eye on her grocery cart on the pretext that she had forgotten something in the store. Several seconds later, a male confederate arrived behind the first confederate's cart and began to move it in order to take her place. It was found that participants (N = 40) intervened to stop the second confederate more frequently in the commitment condition. The results support the assumption that bystander commitment influences behavior even in a non-crime situation.
    Psychological Reports 08/2014; · 0.44 Impact Factor
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    Mickaël Dupré, sebastien Meineri, Nicolas Guéguen
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    ABSTRACT: The success of the policy of recycling of waste is based on the adoption by most people adapted domestic practices. The challenge for institutions is that many involved in the sorting device in place. By combining persuasion and commitment, binding communication is a form of communication unexplored in order to change the sorting practices. This study compares three different binding communication with variation of the free behavior: we experienced a foot-in-the-door, a weakly committing two-feet-in-the-door and a more committing two-feet-in-the-door. A measurement six weeks after the experiment conclude that each of the forms of binding communication permit to change sorting practices. Moreover, the committing behaviors modify effects of binding communication. More specifically, the behavioral change increase with repetition and importance of committing act.
    Revue Internationale de Psychologie Sociale 07/2014; 102(2):259-284. · 0.05 Impact Factor
  • Céline Jacob, Nicolas Guéguen, Gaëlle Boulbry
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    ABSTRACT: Managing and developing positive customer relationships is a critical factor in the success of a restaurant. In this study, waitresses either asked customers about their satisfaction with the food or service before proposing tea or coffee, or they directly proposed coffee or tea without asking about satisfaction. It was found that the number of customers who ordered coffee/tea was significantly higher when the waitress asked the customers about their satisfaction. The theoretical and practical interest of studying the effect of verbal communication toward customers is discussed.
    International Journal of Hospitality Management 05/2014; 39:50–52. · 1.77 Impact Factor
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    Jordy Stefan, Nicolas Guéguen
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    ABSTRACT: Previous research has found that restaurant waitresses wearing flowers in their hair received higher tips. Here, the effect of hair ornamentation on responses to an explicit request for help was assessed. Two female confederates wearing a barrette with or without a flower asked 240 passersby (120 men, 120 women; apparently 30 to 40 years of age) in the street for bus fare change. The uccess rate was 76.7% when they wore the ornamentation and only 50.8% without the ornamentation. Both men and women more readily helped those with the hair ornamentation.
    Psychological Reports 04/2014; 114(2):491-5. · 0.44 Impact Factor
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    Nicolas Guéguen, Céline Jacob
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    ABSTRACT: Glass color may influence the evaluation of food and beverages as has been reported in a previous study where participants rated a cold beverage presented in a blue glass to be more thirst-quenching than the same beverage poured into a green, yellow, or red glass. Our experiment sought to test whether container color also can affect the perceived temperature of a warm beverage. One hundred and twenty undergraduates were given warm coffee served in cups of different colors (blue, green, yellow, and red) and were asked to indicate which beverage was the warmest. Statistically significant differences among colors were found. The red cup was evaluated as containing the warmest beverage (38.3%), followed by the yellow (28.3%), the green (20.0%), and the blue (13.3%) cups. Conventional associations between warm versus cool colors are used to explain these results. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Col Res Appl, 39, 79–81, 2014
    Color Research & Application 02/2014; 39(1). · 1.01 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This study compares the effectiveness of three sources of influence [conformity, obedience to authority, and the “but you are free to…” (BYAFT) technique] to induce smokers to put their cigarettes butts in an ashtray rather than dropping them on the ground. Conformity was operationalized with a sign placed above ashtrays. This sign mentioned that most people throw their cigarette butts in the ashtrays. The BYAFT technique was operationalized with a sign mentioning that people were free to throw their cigarette butts in the ashtray. Finally, obedience was operationalized by the setting of the experiment: the Préfecture symbolizing authority and the shopping mall, a “non-authority” setting. Results indicated the main effect of conformity and obedience but not the BYAFT. However, the BYAFT effect depended on the presence or absence of authority and conformity. Interactions between the three influence sources are discussed.
    Social Influence 01/2014; 9(2):83-98. · 0.46 Impact Factor
  • Nicolas guéguen, alexandre pascual
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    ABSTRACT: Low-balling is a technique designed to gain compliance by making a very attractive initial offer to induce a person to accept the offer and then making the terms less favorable. Studies have shown that this approach is more successful than when the less favorable request is made directly. However, the effect of this technique on more problematic and costly requests remained in question. In two experimental field studies, a request was made to participants and, after agreeing, they were informed that the request referred to deviant behaviors. Results showed that the low-ball technique remained effective with both men and women. The theoretical power of commitment is discussed to explain these results.
    Social Influence 01/2014; 9(3):162-171. · 0.46 Impact Factor
  • Nicolas Guéguen
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    ABSTRACT: The positive effect of tactile contact on compliance has been widely reported in the literature. However, the effect of touch on willingness to disclose confidential information has never been studied. Two days after European Parliamentary elections, people who were walking by in the street were asked by an interviewer who was unknown to them, to reveal for which candidate they had voted. According to a random distribution, some of the people who were questioned were slightly touched on the forearm by the interviewer during the formulation of the request but the rest of the participants were not touched. Results showed that, compared with the participants who were not touched, those who were touched were more likely to be willing to disclose their voting preference (88.6% of the touched group vs. 63.3% of the no-touch group), suggesting that touch is a facilitator of self-revelation.
    Social Behavior and Personality An International Journal 01/2014; 42(6). · 0.31 Impact Factor
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    S. Meineri, N. Guéguen
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    ABSTRACT: Introduction Les préoccupations croissantes pour l’environnement donnent lieu à l’élaboration de nombreux projets visant à modifier les attitudes et/ou comportements des individus dans un sens plus écologique. Si les leviers de changement traditionnels (information/persuasion) tendent à montrer leurs limites (Perloff, 2003). La communication engageante (Joule et al., 2004), de par ces résultats prometteurs, se présente comme une alternative pertinente. Objectif Notre recherche, basée sur le paradigme de la communication engageante, visait à inciter des individus à participer à un dispositif leur permettant de réduire leurs consommations d’énergie et émissions de CO2. L’objectif théorique sous-jacent était de cerner l’impact d’une variable que des théoriciens de l’engagement (Girandola, 2003 ; Joule et Beauvois, 1998 ; Joule et al., 2004) tiennent pour déterminante dans l’effet du paradigme bien qu’elle n’ait pas encore fait l’objet d’une étude empirique : l’identification de l’action (Vallacher et Wegner, 1985). Méthode Cent vingt-trois foyers bretons ont reçu un courrier leur proposant de participer au dispositif présenté. En fonction de leur appartenance aux conditions expérimentales, certains de ces foyers s’étaient vus proposer huit à dix jours de répondre à un questionnaire par téléphone, présenté en référence à deux niveaux distincts d’identification. Résultats Les analyses statistiques pratiquées révèlent un effet positif de la procédure sur les intentions des foyers de participer au dispositif, mais seulement lorsque la formulation de la requête préparatoire se réfère à une identité de niveau élevé. Conclusion Les résultats, discutés en référence aux théories de l’engagement (0115 and 0120 ; Kiesler, 1971), de l’auto-perception (Bem, 1972) et de l’identification de l’action (Vallacher et Wegner, 1985) offrent des arguments en faveur d’une première validation empirique de l’effet de l’identification de l’action dans le paradigme de la communication engageante.
    Revue Européenne de Psychologie Appliquée 01/2014; 64(1):3–11. · 0.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We conducted 2 experiments (N = 180 participants in Study 1 and N = 102 in Study 2) to examine the effect of imitation shown by a mediator towards negotiators who were on opposing sides in regard to a financial decision being made by a fictitious company. Contrary to what was expected, data in the first study showed that, when the mediator imitated the negotiator during the first 5 minutes of an interview, this was insufficient to predispose negotiators to be more likely to reach an agreement with one another. The results in the second study showed that imitation conducted over a longer time and repeated more often during negotiations predisposed opposing parties to be more likely to agree with one another. Applications and limitations of these studies are discussed.
    Social Behavior and Personality An International Journal 01/2014; 42(2). · 0.31 Impact Factor
  • Céline Jacob, Nicolas Guéguen
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    ABSTRACT: Research has shown that compliments addressed to customers by an employee have a positive influence on the customers’ tipping behavior. In this study, we examined whether compliments also enhanced patrons’ compliance with a food server's suggestion. First, a restaurant waitress took the customers’ order for the main course. Then, in the ingratiation condition, the waitress complimented the customer for his/her choice while in the no-compliment condition, she did not give any compliment. Finally, the waitress suggested a dessert to the patron. Results showed that the dessert suggestion was more readily followed in the compliment condition.
    International Journal of Hospitality Management. 01/2014; 40:59–61.
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    ABSTRACT: Studies have shown that the high status of a car used as a frustrator acts as an inhibitor of drivers’ horn-honking responses at traffic lights. In this field study, we extended the role played by car status through examining its effect on another driver behavior. A confederate driving either a high-status or a low-status car was instructed to drive at a speed below the speed limit. What was measured was the frequency of responses to the frustrator that resulted in passing the slow-moving vehicle. It was found that more passing behaviors occurred in the low-status condition, and that the difference between the low and the high status increased as soon as the confederate’s speed decreased.
    Transportation Research Part F Traffic Psychology and Behaviour 01/2014; 22:245–248. · 1.99 Impact Factor
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    Nicolas Guéguen, Jordy Stefan
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    ABSTRACT: Previous studies have shown that pleasant weather conditions can improve people's mood and facilitate positive social relationships. The current study tested the effect of sunshine on drivers' willingness to give hitchhikers a ride. Four confederates (2 men, 2 women; M age = 20 yr.) acted as hitchhikers on the roadside in France, on sunny and cloudy days. To minimize the influence of other important variables, hitchhiking was conducted only when it was not raining and only when the external temperatures were between 20 degrees and 24 degrees C. Motorists' behavior in 2,864 hitchhiking events was analyzed. The results showed that both male and female drivers stopped more on sunny days than on cloudy days for both male and female hitchhikers. Perhaps the positive mood induced by the sunshine promotes helping behaviors.
    Psychological Reports 12/2013; 113(3):994-1000. · 0.44 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This field study on blood donor behavior tests the effectiveness of semantic priming on donor intention and commitment. Using face-to-face interactions, participants were primed with the concept of love and solicited to promise blood to the French National Blood Bank. Results showed a significant effect on willingness to donate blood and on donor commitment. The relatively simple and easily implemented technique used in this study could be of interest in improving performance of recruitment and retention campaigns.
    Transfusion and Apheresis Science 11/2013; · 1.23 Impact Factor
  • Nicolas Guéguen, Céline Jacob
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    ABSTRACT: Red is traditionally connected with love and sex. However, the effect of red on human behavior still remains in question. Women with Internet personal ads registered on a web meeting site displayed photographs with their upper clothes colored in red, black, white, yellow, blue, and green. The dependent variable was the number of contacts received from men. It was found that women's ads with red received significantly more contacts. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Col Res Appl, 38, 309–312, 2013
    Color Research & Application 08/2013; 38(4). · 1.01 Impact Factor
  • Nicolas Guéguen, Lubomir Lamy
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    ABSTRACT: Judgments of photographs have shown that makeup enhances ratings of women's facial attractiveness. The present study assessed whether makeup affects the stopping behavior of drivers in response to a hitchhiker's signal. Four 20- to 22-year-old female confederates wore facial makeup, or not, while pretending to be hitchhiking. Frequency of stopping was compared in 1,600 male and female drivers. Facial makeup was associated with an increase in the number of male drivers who stopped to offer a ride. Makeup did not affect frequency of stopping by female drivers.
    Psychological Reports 08/2013; 113(1):1109-13. · 0.44 Impact Factor
  • Nicolas Guéguen
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    ABSTRACT: Some studies have shown that figurative cues, presented in the immediate environment of an individual, affect his/her later behavior. This effect was studied in a tipping behavior context. In three restaurants, each bill was placed under a dish, which had a cardioid shape, a round shape, or a square shape. Results showed that more tips were left in the bill dish with the cardioid shape. The activation spreading theory is used to explain these results.
    Journal of Applied Social Psychology 08/2013; 43(8). · 0.83 Impact Factor
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    Angélique Martin, Céline Jacob, Nicolas Guéguen
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    ABSTRACT: People interact more readily with someone with whom they think they have something in common, but the effect of an incidental similarity has never been examined on social networks. Facebook users were contacted by a stranger who also possessed a Facebook page and who asked them to become his friend. The request message contained one item of similarity, two items of similarity, or none. Compliance to the request was the dependent variable. Increased compliance to the request was found when comparing the two similarity conditions with the control no-similarity condition. However, no difference was found between the two similarity conditions. Similarity appears to foster relationships on social networks.
    Psychological Reports 08/2013; 113(1):1229-32. · 0.44 Impact Factor

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