Melanie Lukas

M.Sc.; Dipl. Oecotroph.
Research Fellow

Publications

  • Source
    Melanie Lukas, Christa Liedtke, Holger Rohn
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The food sector accounts for huge environmental impacts caused by production, processing, final consumption and waste treatment in private households or in out of home catering settings. Further, the field of nutrition inextricably links environmental and health aspects to each other. But until today no conceptual draft is available to relate both fields of investigation together. Thus, the domain of nutrition has to be considered intensively if environmental aspects and health considerations should be further examined. A comprehensive conceptual draft is developed in this paper, the so-called nutritional footprint. This first approach is formed in detail by setting a data assortment of available environmental data (e.g. material footprint or carbon footprints within the life cycle) in relation to available nutrition data (e.g. salt content or calorie specifications). As a second step all data is linked to recommendations (e.g. WHO recommendations or valid scientific recommendations) and finally a comparison of environmental and health impacts of foodstuff becomes possible. A nutritional footprint presents a way to match and communicate environmental and health issues together. The draft is available and useful for companies to expand their internal data and their external communication performance. To illustrate the concept, two menus from McDonald's Germany Inc. are estimated as sample calculations.
    World Resources Forum, Davos; 10/2013
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The food and nutrition sector accounts for huge environmental impacts caused by production, processing, final consumption and waste treatment in private households or in out of home catering settings. Further, the field of nutrition inextricably links environmental and health aspects to each other. Thus, the domain of nutrition has to be considered intensively if environmental aspects and health considerations should be further investigated. However, a healthy and environmentally friendly diet is a criterion which remains quite abstract to the consumer. Against this background, the following research question is addressed: "How can environmental & health indicators be linked to each other?". For that reason a comprehensive concept is developed in this paper, the so-called nutritional footprint. The model is based on conceptual frameworks, such as the Hot Spot Analysis. Within a data assortment, relevant and available environmental data (e.g. material footprint or water consumption within the life cycle) is set in relation to available nutrition data (e.g. nutrient density or the classical calorie specifications). The paper shows that a nutritional footprint – as an assessment instrument – presents a way to communicate environmental and health issues together and provides a comprehensive and integrated perspective on quantitative and qualitative data. The concept developed in this paper is also available and useful for companies to expand their internal data and their external communication performance. Nonetheless the current paper presents a first version on this concept, which has to be refined in cooperation with a leading fast food company in order to integrate the approach in their business.
    Food and Environment 2013; 04/2013
  • Source
    Melanie Lukas
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Creating more and more innovative technologies to face the challenge of sustainability transitions is not going to have a major impact, a lesson we could learn from the present status of sustainable development. According to this, a change of consumption patterns and lifestyles is necessary to encourage sustainable development. Hence the theory of social practice is used by an increasing number of authors to analyze practices linked to sustainability ideals. The present paper is going to analyze the theoretical approach of private consumption in context of sustainability transitions and social innovation. With the help of 40 consumer interviews the theoretical background is expanded. Therefore the analysis allows identifying processes of how social innovation is created by the users themselves within individual social practices. Especially the aspect of how consumers deal with sufficiency in daily life will be investigated. The results state that a set of sufficient behavior patterns can be identified and the patterns are regularly applied by the majority of the interviewees. The interviewees apply strategies of sufficient behavior due to different life experience, life phases or in specific fields of private consumption and due to different motives. Finally the prospective of the paper is going to emphasize further need of research within the concept of sufficiency.
    ICICI, Friedrichshafen; 01/2012

43 Following View all

28 Followers View all