Publications

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    ABSTRACT: Researchers suggest that video-based interventions can provide increased opportunity for students with disabilities to acquire important academic and functional skills; however, little research exists regarding video-based interventions on the academic skills of students with autism and intellectual disability. We used a multiple-baseline-across-participants design to investigate the effects of video self-modeling (VSM) on the mathematics skill acquisition of adolescents with autism. Four adolescent male students viewed videos of themselves on an iPad solving mathematical problems to estimate the amount of money used to pay for a given item and the amount to receive in change. Findings support a functional relationship between VSM and performance on math skills for each participant. Subsequently, the VSM was systematically faded during maintenance sessions, with little deterioration of skill. Follow-up data probes were interpreted to conclude that student characteristics may affect retention of skill. Implications for practice and research are discussed.
    Focus on Autism and Other Developmental Disabilities 01/2013; 28(2):67-77. · 1.05 Impact Factor
  • Melissa Heath, Tina T Dyches, Mary Anne Prater
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    ABSTRACT: he book's content and the included lesson plans are specifically designed to supplement school-wide efforts to reduce and eliminate bullying. The lesson plans enable students to understand the importance of environments where everyone feels welcomed, valued, and respected. Supplemented by creative illustrations and summarized tables of key information, the book will be helpful to community and school librarians, elementary school teachers, and paraprofessionals serving pre-K through 4th grade students. Additionally, school-based mental health professionals such as school counselors, psychologists, and social workers can utilize the book's resources to teach social skills in classrooms and group counseling sessions.
    01/2013; ABC-CLIO., ISBN: 978-1610690973
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    ABSTRACT: Video self-modeling (VSM) has been used for decades to effectively improve individuals' behaviors and skills. The purpose of this review is to locate and analyze published studies that used VSM for typical school-based academic skills to determine the effect of VSM interventions on students' academic performance. Only eight studies were located that met the selection criteria. Based on the results of these 8 studies, VSM shows promise for improving academic performance, although the small number of studies limits our ability to draw strong conclusions about the efficacy of VSM across the school age span and across various academic skills. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    Psychology in the Schools 01/2012; 49(1). · 0.72 Impact Factor
  • Education and Treatment of Children 01/2012; 35(4):521-546.
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    ABSTRACT: Bullying, a serious issue in today’s schools, negatively impacts children. This article summarizes research and emphasizes the need for effective tools, such as bibliotherapy, to deter bullying. To assist professionals in selecting books for bibliotherapy, 38 bully-themed children’s K-3 picture books ranked 1- 4 by The Horn Book Guide (HBG) from January 1, 2004 through January 1, 2010 were analyzed. Comparisons were made between the selected books’ portrayals of bullying and aspects of bullying, and bully prevention described in research literature. Information was summarized, including the following details: (a) gender of bully and victim, (b) type of bullying, (c) location of bullying, (d) responses of bystanders and adults, and (e) resolution of bullying problems. Considering this descriptive information, professionals are advised to more selectively recommend books to fit the unique needs of students and encourage desired bullying resolution strategies.
    Reading Horizons. 01/2011; 51(2):Article 5.
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    ABSTRACT: Special education faculty members (n = 12) from a large Western university participated in a four-year professional development program centered on increasing their cultural responsiveness. During the fourth year the primary investigator interviewed faculty members regarding their perceptions and the impact of the program. Each interview was audiotaped, transcribed, and analyzed using the inductive analysis design for qualitative research (Hatch, 2002). Faculty expressed likes and dislikes of the program and provided suggestions for future professional development. Other results that emerged included that time was a barrier, that leaving campus facilitated learning, and that collaboration enhanced learning. Faculty reported that the professional development made them self-reflect, change practice and attitudes, adjust their perceptions of diverse students, and alter professional interactions. Faculty also expressed personal conflicts as a result of these activities.
    Teacher Education and Special Education The Journal of the Teacher Education Division of the Council for Exceptional Children 11/2010; 33(4):263-278.
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    ABSTRACT: Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a neurobiological condition affecting 1 of every 200 school-age children. OCD greatly affects students’ academic, behavioral, and social functioning, and it can lead to additional problem such as depression. To effectively collaborate with other individuals providing appropriate support to students with OCD, teachers need to understand this disorder, particularly its manifestations in school settings. This article addresses typical manifestations of OCD in school settings and provides general and specific accommodations for teachers to implement in their classrooms.
    Intervention in School and Clinic 01/2010; 45(4):221-231. · 0.40 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Newbery books represent quality literature that has a profound social-emotional impact on its readers, yet these books have not been systematically evaluated for their portrayal of characters with disabilities. Thirty-one Newbery Award and Honor books from 1975–2009 were identified and portrayed 41 main or supporting characters with disabilities. These books were evaluated using the Rating Scale for Quality Characterizations of Individuals with Disabilities in Children’s Literature. Results indicate the representation of Newbery characters with disabilities is not proportionate to the current U.S. population of students with disabilities. Further, racial representation portrayed in these books is not representative of the diverse students receiving special education services. Trend analyses indicate that overall the portrayal of characters with disabilities is increasingly positive. School personnel are encouraged to select appropriate books for their instructional or bibliotherapeutic purposes. Authors are encouraged to include dynamic, exemplary, and memorable characters who are representative of today’s school population of students with disabilities.
    01/2010;
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    ABSTRACT: As schools emphasize accountability and academic progress for all students, professional collaboration is a critical aspect of planning accommodations and interventions that address the learning needs of diverse learners. To better understand collaborative processes, the authors investigated the nature of a collaborative planning experience for pairs of special and general education teachers. Teachers were taught the curriculum, rules, instruction, materials, and environment collaboration process (M. A. Prater, 2003) in which teachers compared the demands of the general education classroom with the strengths and limitations of the individual student. Results indicate that sharing common philosophies about educating students with disabilities is an important aspect of successful collaborative planning. Teachers who expressed common philosophies about educating students with disabilities completed the process together. The teachers who did not express similar philosophies completed the process separately.
    Preventing School Failure 01/2009; 54(1):60-70.
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    ABSTRACT: Stress and burnout contribute significantly to the shortages of school-based speech-language pathologists (SLPs). At the request of the Utah State Office of Education, the researchers measured the stress levels of 97 school-based SLPs using the Speech-Language Pathologist Stress Inventory. Results indicated that participants' emotional-fatigue manifestations, instructional limitations, biobehavioral manifestations, lack of professional supports, and total stress were significantly below that of the original national sample. However, of the 48 survey items, participants' responses indicated more stress in three specific areas, namely, caseload size, salary, and the use of prescription drugs. Caseload and salary have been identified in other studies as major sources of stress for SLPs. No significant differences in stress were identified with the type of school district (rural and urban), number of years' experience, or number of students served. Efforts to reduce stress levels of SLPs should be aimed at increasing supports, reducing caseloads, and increasing salaries.
    Communication Disorders Quarterly 01/2009; 30(2):103-111.
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    Mary Anne Prater, Temma Harris Devereaux
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    ABSTRACT: Given that the numbers of culturally and/or linguistically diverse students being educated in U.S. public schools are growing immensely, teacher educators must take responsibility for preparing teacher candidates to work in today's diverse classrooms. This can be difficult, however, if teacher educators are not culturally responsive in their curricular content and pedagogy. Teacher educators could benefit from engaging in professional development in this area. In this article, we discuss the professional literature on culturally responsive higher education training. We focus on the intended outcomes of professional development, including faculty knowledge, skills, and dispositions, as well as activities to promote cultural responsiveness among teacher education faculty.
    Action in Teacher Education. 01/2009; 31(3).
  • Mary Anne Prater, Lynn K. Wilder, Tina Taylor Dyches
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    ABSTRACT: Educational professionals agree that traditional preservice preparation has been inadequate in preparing educators to teach culturally and/or linguistically diverse students. Reasons for this lack of preparation are generally identified as an insufficient number of diverse teacher candidates and poor infusion of culturally competent practices across programs. Most universities and colleges have responded to these needs, but neglect the need to improve faculty members’ own cultural competence. We present the journey taken by one traditional special education teacher preparation program to increase the number of diverse candidates enrolled, infuse cultural diversity competence across the program, and improve faculty members’ sensitivity and appropriate responses toward cultural differences.
    Teaching Education 01/2008; 19(2):137-151.
  • TEACHING Exceptional Children. 01/2008; 40(5):16-22.
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    ABSTRACT: All students, especially those with ADHD, need exercise to assist with concentration and to use as an outlet for healthy impulse discharge to control impulsivity. One of the general strategies designed for students with hyperactivity includes incorporating movement into classroom life. This article will help teachers create a classroom learning environment that encourages beneficial movement throughout the school day, during content lessons, transitions, and provide structured movement games for recess and rainy day activities.
    Abstracts from Teaching Exceptional Children (TEC). 01/2008;
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    Mary Anne Prater, Tina Taylor Dyches
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    ABSTRACT: In this article we present our top 25 children and young adult books that portray disabilities, including chapter and picture books. These books were selected based on literary and artistic qualities, as well as realistic and appropriate portrayals of disabilities. We provide a brief synopsis of each book, as well as identify the type of disabilities portrayed and the appropriate reading/interest levels.
    Abstracts from Teaching Exceptional Children (TEC). 01/2008;
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    ABSTRACT: Increasing numbers of students in U.S. schools are at greater risk of school failure because of social, economic, and family stress factors. Teachers can use literature as bibliotherapy for both children and adolescents to create a safe distance, allowing them to deal with sensitive issues related to these problems, as well as to teach social skills that can then help prevent school failure. In this article, the authors present a 10-step process for implementing bibliotherapy in the classroom and provide a sample of juvenile books that could be used in bibliotherapy.
    Preventing School Failure 01/2006; 50(4):5-10.
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    ABSTRACT: Children's literature often portrays characters with disabilities. These books may be used to promote awareness, understanding, and acceptance of those with disabilities. We provide guidelines for selecting high-quality literature and ideas for using characterizations of learning disabilities to teach students about themselves and others. Two sample lesson plans and a list of 30 recommended books are included.
    Intervention in School and Clinic 01/2006; 42(1):14-24. · 0.40 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The need for research-based instructional support for culturally and linguistically diverse students with reading difficulties is a national priority. In this rural Hawaii study, teachers and parents selected four first-grade students who were experiencing delays in reading fluency and comprehension skills to receive tutoring and video self-modeling interventions. Two students were identified as having specific learning disabilities, one as being developmentally delayed, and one was in the process of being referred for special education. Community partners were trained to provide tutoring with the 25-step ACE reading protocol. Two 2-minute self-modeling videotapes were constructed: the first depicted the student fluently reading a passage; the second showed the student applying a story map and successfully answering comprehension questions. A multiple-baseline design across two behaviors (reading fluency and comprehension) was used to observe the effect of each intervention on reading fluency and comprehension skills. Reading fluency, measured in number of correct words per minute, doubled for three students and quadrupled for the fourth by the end of eight weeks. Reading comprehension, measured in number of correct responses, reached pre-established criteria. Viewing the self-modeling videotapes was associated with reduced variability and maintenance of increased performance. Follow-up indicated that gains maintained for six months. Teachers and parents reported generalization to classroom and home.
    Learning Disability Quarterly 05/2004; 27(2):89-103. · 0.77 Impact Factor

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