Lynda R. Matthews

Applied Psychology, Allied Health Science, Traumatology

BHtlhSc (Hons 1), PhD
25.14

Publications

  • Leadership and Collaboration: Further Developments for Interprofessional Education., Edited by Dawn Forman, Marion Jones, Jill Thistlethwaite, 05/2015: chapter Utilising Curriculum Renewal as a Way of Leading Cultural Change in Australian Health Professional Education; Palgrave Macmillan.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Quite apart from its devastating human and psychological effects, the death of a worker can have significant, life-changing effects on their families. For many affected families, workers' compensation entitlements represent the primary financial safeguard. Where the worker was self-employed, the family will generally be excluded from this remedy and have to take the more problematic option of claiming damages at common law. Despite the centrality of workers' compensation, little attention has been given to how effectively workers' compensation agencies address the needs of bereaved families or the views of other organisations involved, such as safety inspectors, unions, employers and victim advocates. Based on interviews with forty eight organisational representatives in five Australian states, this study examines how workers' compensation regimes deal with work-related death from the perspective of those organisations involved directly or indirectly in the process. The study highlighted a number of problems, including the exclusion of self-employed workers and dealing with 'mixed families'. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
    International Journal of Law and Psychiatry 02/2015; 38. DOI:10.1016/j.ijlp.2015.01.002 · 1.19 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Vocational rehabilitation services have been implemented in a number of countries to facilitate the return to work of sick and injured workers, yet little research has been undertaken to document competencies required to provide services globally. This study compared the job tasks, functions, and knowledge domains deemed important by Australian and German rehabilitation professionals working in vocational rehabilitation settings to identify common practice domains. An online survey comprising items from the Rehabilitation Skills Inventory–Amended and the International Survey of Disability Management was completed by 149 Australian and 217 German rehabilitation professionals. Items from each measure were submitted to factor analysis, using principal axis factoring as the extraction technique. Three common domains were identified: (a) vocational counseling, (b) workplace disability case management, and (c) workplace intervention and program management. Differences in skill and knowledge domains centered on the levels of specialization in vocational rehabilitation practices in each country. Ongoing transnational research is required to ensure that a “global curriculum” covers core competencies, while at the same time allowing for specialization at a local level.
    Rehabilitation Counseling Bulletin 01/2015; 58(2):80-90. DOI:10.1177/0034355213504304 · 0.48 Impact Factor
  • Source
    Nicholas Buys · Lynda R Matthews · Christine Randall
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Abstract Purpose: There is a strong connection between disability and decreased participation rates in the Australian labour market. Australian government policy recognises vocational rehabilitation as a key strategy to increase employment rates of people with disabilities. Methods: This paper examines current Australian disability employment policies and practices. It also reviews vocational rehabilitation competency research to identify knowledge and skill domains central to quality service provision, and explores the delivery of tertiary level vocational rehabilitation education. Results: Policy changes in Australia over the last decade have been aimed at addressing the unsustainable increase in disability benefits. In this context vocational rehabilitation services continue to be viewed as crucial in assisting people with disabilities to maintain employment and reduce disengagement. Competencies research has consistently identified vocational counselling, personal counselling, professional practice and case management as central to quality vocational rehabilitation service provision. Two competencies identified in recent research, workplace disability case management and workplace interventions and program management, reflect the centrality of vocational rehabilitation to disability management. Conclusions: Changes in the policy environment to reduce the number of disability pension recipients will inevitably lead to an increased demand for trained vocational rehabilitation personnel. Given the development of strong accreditation standards for vocational rehabilitation education and practice that underpin the provision of tertiary level rehabilitation counselling training programs, professionally qualified rehabilitation counsellors are ideally placed to address the complex employment needs of people with a disability. Implications for Rehabilitation It is important to understand changes that may occur in policy environments in terms of their impact on vocational rehabilitation service delivery for people with disabilities. Variable levels of training in the vocational rehabilitation sector result in people with complex needs not consistently receiving the services they need to access and maintain employment. Practitioners need to focus increasingly on individualized service delivery where the client has significant control over decisions about their rehabilitation program.
    Disability and Rehabilitation 07/2014; 37(9):1-5. DOI:10.3109/09638288.2014.942001 · 1.84 Impact Factor
  • Lynda R Matthews · Francine Hanley · Virginia Lewis · Caroline Howe
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Abstract Purpose: With social and economic costs of workplace injury on the increase, efficient payment models that deliver quality rehabilitation outcomes are of increasing interest. This paper provides a perspective on the issue informed by both refereed literature and published research material not available commercially (gray literature). Methods: A review of payment models, workers' compensation and compensable injury identified relevant peer-reviewed and gray literature that informed our discussion. Results: Fee-for-service and performance-based payment models dominate the health and rehabilitation literature, each described as having benefits and challenges to achieving quality outcomes for consumers. There appears to be a movement toward performance-based payments in compensable workplace injury settings as they are perceived to promote time-efficient services and support innovation in rehabilitation practice. However, it appears that the challenges that arise for workplace-based rehabilitation providers and professionals when working under the various payment models, such as staff retention and quality of client-practitioner relationship, are absent from the literature and this could lead to flawed policy decisions. Conclusions: Robust evidence of the benefits and costs associated with different payment models - from the perspectives of clients/consumers, funders and service providers - is needed to inform best practice in rehabilitation of compensable workplace injuries. Implications for Rehabilitation Available but limited evidence suggests that payment models providing financial incentives for stakeholder-agreed vocational rehabilitation outcomes tend to improve service effectiveness in workers' compensation settings, although there is little evidence of service quality or client satisfaction. Working in a system that identifies payments for stakeholder-agreed outcomes may be more satisfying for rehabilitation practitioners in workers' compensation settings by allowing more clinical autonomy and innovative practice. Researchers need to work closely with the compensation and rehabilitation sector as well as governments to establish robust evidence of the benefits and costs of payment models, from the perspectives of clients/consumers, funders, service providers and rehabilitation professionals.
    Disability and Rehabilitation 06/2014; 37(6):1-5. DOI:10.3109/09638288.2014.933897 · 1.84 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Health professionals need preparation and support to work in collaborative practice teams, a requirement brought about by an aging population and increases in chronic and complex diseases. Therefore, health professions education has seen the introduction of interprofessional education (IPE) competency frameworks to provide a common lens through which disciplines can understand, describe, and implement team-based practices. Whilst an admirable aim, often this has resulted in more confusion with the introduction of varying definitions about similar constructs, particularly in relation to what IPE actually means.The authors explore the nature of the terms competency and framework, while critically appraising the concept of competency frameworks and competency-based education. They distinguish between competencies for health professions that are profession specific, those that are generic, and those that may be achieved only through IPE. Four IPE frameworks are compared to consider their similarities and differences, which ultimately influence how IPE is implemented. They are the Interprofessional Capability Framework (United Kingdom), the National Interprofessional Competency Framework (Canada), the Core Competencies for Interprofessional Collaborative Practice (United States), and the Curtin University Interprofessional Capability Framework (Australia).The authors highlight the need for further discussion about establishing a common language, strengthening ways in which academic environments work with practice environments, and improving the assessment of interprofessional competencies and teamwork, including the development of assessment tools for collaborative practice. They also argue that for IPE frameworks to be genuinely useful, they need to augment existing curricula by emphasizing outcomes that might be attained only through interprofessional activity.
    Academic medicine: journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges 06/2014; 89(6):869-75. DOI:10.1097/ACM.0000000000000249 · 3.47 Impact Factor
  • Source
    Economic and Labour Relations Review 05/2014; 25(2):253-270. DOI:10.1177/1035304614534350
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This paper reports on three interrelated Australian studies that provide a nationally coherent and evidence-informed approach to interprofessional education (IPE). Based on findings from previous studies that IPE tends to be marginalized in mainstream health curriculum, the three studies aspired to produce a range of resources that would guide the sustainable implementation of IPE across the Australian higher education sector. Nine national universities, two peak industry bodies and a non-government organization constituted the study team. Data were gathered via a mixture of stakeholder consultations, surveys and interviews and analyzed using quantitative and qualitative methods. An important outcome was a curriculum renewal framework which has been used to explore the implications of the study's findings on Australian nursing. While the findings are pertinent to all health professions, nursing is well placed to take a leading role in establishing IPE as a central element of health professional education.
    Applied nursing research: ANR 05/2014; 27(2):115-20. DOI:10.1016/j.apnr.2014.03.002 · 1.14 Impact Factor
  • Jasim Anwar · Elias Mpofu · Lynda R Matthews · Kaye E Brock
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This study sought to predict posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) from women's reproductive health events after an earthquake experience. Data on antenatal care, pregnancy outcomes, family planning, socioeconomic status, earthquake experiences, and mental health were collected from a random sample of 425 women of reproductive age using the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Reproductive Health Assessment Toolkit and the Harvard Trauma Questionnaire. Data were analyzed using multivariate regression analysis to predict PTSD symptoms from posttrauma care variables and reproductive health events. Restricted social participation, use of temporary accommodation, pregnancy complications, and use of injectable contraceptives were significant risk factors of PTSD. These factors may be exacerbated by the social context of conservative societies, traditions about health care-seeking behavior, and access to health care. Antecedent reproductive health events influence women's reaction to major trauma including events such as an earthquake.
    The Journal of nervous and mental disease 12/2013; 201(12):1045-1052. DOI:10.1097/NMD.0000000000000060 · 1.81 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This paper examines the barriers to employment faced by job seekers (JS) with mental illness and additional substance-use issues. Semi-structured interviews concerning barriers to employment for JS with mental illness and substance-use problems and strategies to improve employment outcomes were conducted with stakeholders associated with an employment service provider specialising in mental illness (n = 17). Stakeholders were JS, family members who provide significant support to JS [support persons (SP)] and staff [employment staff (ES)]. Data were collected between May and August 2009 at the premises of the employment service provider in metropolitan Sydney. Thematic analysis of transcribed interview data was conducted to develop a meaningful data framework. The expectations of JS and SP regarding employment outcomes were higher than those of ES. Length of time unemployed was perceived as the most important barrier to future employment associated with mental illness, and substance-use problems were associated with lower, more variable motivation, restrictions on the environments where JS could work and more negative community and employer perceptions. The findings are consistent with studies from non-vocational settings and provide direction for meeting the needs of clients with mental illness and additional substance-use problems. Ensuring alignment between JS and ES concerning service goals and expected timeframes may improve JS motivation, satisfaction with service delivery and ultimately, employment outcomes.
    Health & Social Care in the Community 07/2013; 22(1). DOI:10.1111/hsc.12062 · 1.15 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Labour force participation of people with mental disorders varies according to the nature of their disorder. Research that compares function and psychosocial need in job-seekers with different mental disorders, however, is scant especially in the Australian setting. Identifying rehabilitation needs of job-seekers with mental disorders receiving employment services are of interest to providers of disability employment services in Australia. This study sought to identify differences in health, social need and function in people with anxiety, mood, or psychotic disorders accessing disability employment services to inform disability service providers of vocational rehabilitation interventions. 106 adult job-seekers with anxiety (29%), mood (51%), and psychotic (20%) disorders receiving job placement services from a disability employment service provider consented to participate in this study. Self-report measures and the Executive Interview (EXIT) were used to document function. Differences between disorders were determined using one-way analysis of variance. Significantly better estimates of social functioning as measured by the Behaviour and Symptom Identification Scale (BASIS-32) were reported by job-seekers with psychotic disorders compared to those with anxiety or mood disorders. However, job-seekers with psychotic disorders reported longer periods of unemployment compared to those with mood disorders and longer estimates of the time it would take to obtain work compared to both the other groups. Perceived psychosocial problems such as poor social function in job-seekers with anxiety and mood disorders and perceptions of poor employability in those with psychotic disorders should be considered when developing vocational rehabilitation interventions, or where additional support may be required once employment is obtained.
    Work 06/2013; 49(2). DOI:10.3233/WOR-131660 · 0.52 Impact Factor
  • Virginia J Lewis · Lisa Dell · Lynda R Matthews
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Objective: The increasing number of veterans with complex health conditions accessing rehabilitation leads to the need for an outcome measure that identifies success in areas beyond return to work. The current study was designed to assess the feasibility of Goal Attainment Scaling as a routine measure of outcomes of rehabilitation. Methods: Fifteen organisations contracted by the Australian Department of Veterans' Affairs to work with veterans were invited to trial Goal Attainment Scaling. Training was provided to rehabilitation professionals, and existing documentation was modified by the Australian Department of Veterans Affairs to introduce the Goal Attainment Scaling approach. Results: Analysis of the use of Goal Attainment Scaling supported the feasibility and potential usefulness of the tool in a veteran population. Rehabilitation providers set goals across a range of domains including medical, psychological, social, as well as return to work. The quality of the goals and the outcome measures was generally good. Conclusions: The Goal Attainment Scaling approach was seen to support a client-focussed approach to rehabilitation. Data obtained through the use of Goal Attainment Scaling can be summarised at different levels to be useful for clients, providers, rehabilitation coordinators, and senior executives to monitor and report on the overall success of the different types of rehabilitation provided to veteran clients.
    Journal of rehabilitation medicine: official journal of the UEMS European Board of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine 03/2013; 45(4):403-9. DOI:10.2340/16501977-1131 · 1.90 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Research and policy on occupational health and safety have understandably focused on workers as the direct victims of workplace hazards. However, serious illness, injury, or death at work also has cascading psychological, social, and economic effects on victims' families and close friends. These effects have been neglected by researchers and policymakers. The number of persons immediately affected by workplace death is significant, even in rich countries with relatively low rates of workplace fatality. Every year, more than 5,000 family members and close friends of Australian workers become survivors of traumatic work-related death (TWD). This study investigated the health, social, and financial consequences of TWD on surviving families. In-depth exploratory interviews were conducted with seven family members who had experienced TWD from one to 20 years before the interviews, with an average of three years. All reported serious health, social, and financial consequences, including prolonged grief and unresolved loss, physical health problems, family disruption and behavioral effects on children, immediate financial difficulties, and disturbance of longer-term commitments such as retirement planning. Recommendations for policy development and improved practice are proposed to minimize the trauma and suffering experienced by families, mitigate consequences, and improve outcomes following a TWD.
    International Journal of Health Services 10/2012; 42(4):647-66. DOI:10.2190/HS.42.4.e · 0.99 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Over 5 thousand family members and close friends of Australian workers become survivors of sudden workplace death each year. Formal responses following the death are central to surviving families' ability to adapt, yet families' experiences of these responses are unknown. This study used in-depth interviews to explore 7 surviving family members' experiences of formal workplace death mechanisms: postdeath protocols; interactions with employers, unions, media and statutory authorities; stages of legal process including coronial inquests, prosecutions by the occupational health and safety (OHS) regulator, and civil action; and outcomes of judicial proceedings. Participants identified difficulties arising from insensitive treatment by authorities, and significant bureaucratic problems, including a lack of information, communication and support. Systematic research that fully examines families' needs and identifies organisational postdeath protocols is required to advance the management of institutional responses following workplace death and thereby improve outcomes for families.
    The International Journal of Disability Management Research 09/2012; 6:37-48. DOI:10.1375/jdmr.6.1.37
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Purpose: This study identified functioning, health, and social needs in jobseekers with mental disorders independently assessed as having capacity to work and referred to disability employment services. Differences in function between jobseekers with mental illness alone and with additional drug and alcohol problems were examined with view to identifying interventions for vocational rehabilitation. Method: A convenience sample of 116 jobseekers completed BASIS-32, CANSAS, AUDIT, DAST-10 and 6 items from the EXIT interview and were divided into two groups: mental illness only, and additional drug and alcohol issues (AUDIT total score >8 and/or DAST total score >3). Analysis of variance was used to determine group differences. Results: Jobseekers reported low-moderate problems with function. Over 40% of the sample reported unresolved psychological distress, physical health needs, and social/daytime activity needs. Thirty-five jobseekers (30%) had additional drug and alcohol problems and reported significantly greater difficulty with impulsive/addictive behavior and poorer memory and executive function than the mental illness only group. No significant differences were identified in past work functioning. Conclusions: Screening all job seekers for psychological, physical, and social needs to identify suitable treatment and rehabilitation strategies and providing interventions that improve emotional regulation and executive function for job seekers with additional drug and alcohol problems may improve employability of job seekers accessing disability employment services. [Box: see text].
    Disability and Rehabilitation 08/2012; 35(6). DOI:10.3109/09638288.2012.699583 · 1.84 Impact Factor
  • Source
    Francine Hanly · Lynda R Matthews · Virginia J Lewis
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This article presents a summary of 10 priorities for the delivery of best practices in psychosocial rehabilitation relevant to the Australian veteran population. The first section interrogates the empirical principles characteristically identified with best practices before presenting an alternative, heuristic framework organised by three reference points and informed by principles of efficacy, external validity, and the meaning of efficacy in the context of parity. The article presents the strategy used in reviewing the literature, before presenting the findings according to 10 key priorities. The 10 priorities are described in the context of the literature informing them and are set out with regard to the centrality of the client-centred service model in the design and delivery of pertinent and effective services into the future.
    The International Journal of Disability Management Research 09/2011; 6:21. DOI:10.1375/jdmr.6.1.10
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The reproductive and mental health of women contributes significantly to their overall well-being. Three of the eight Millennium Development Goals are directly related to reproductive and sexual health while mental disorders make up three of the ten leading causes of disease burden in low and middle-income countries. Among mental disorders, depression and anxiety are two of the most prevalent. In the context of slower progress in achieving Millennium Development Goals in developing countries and the ever-increasing man-made and natural disasters in these areas, it is important to understand the association between reproductive health and mental health among women with post-disaster experiences. This was a cross-sectional study with a sample of 387 women of reproductive age (15-49 years) randomly selected from the October 2005 earthquake affected areas of Pakistan. Data on reproductive health was collected using the Centers for Disease Control reproductive health assessment toolkit. Depression and anxiety were measured using the Hopkins Symptom Checklist-25, while earthquake experiences were captured using the Harvard Trauma Questionnaire. The association of either depression or anxiety with socio-demographic variables, earthquake experiences, reproductive health and access to health facilities was estimated using multivariate logistic regression. Post-earthquake reproductive health events together with economic deprivation, lower family support and poorer access to health care facilities explained a significant proportion of differences in the experiencing of clinical levels of depression and anxiety. For instance, women losing resources for subsistence, separation from family and experiencing reproductive health events such as having a stillbirth, having had an abortion, having had abnormal vaginal discharge or having had genital ulcers, were at significant risk of depression and anxiety. The relationship between women's post-earthquake mental health and reproductive health, socio-economic status, and health care access is complex and explained largely by the socio-cultural role of women. It is suggested that interventions that consider gender differences and that are culturally appropriate are likely to reduce the incidence.
    BMC Public Health 06/2011; 11:523. DOI:10.1186/1471-2458-11-523 · 2.32 Impact Factor
  • Elise Gittoes · Elias Mpofu · Lynda R. Matthews
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This study sought to identify influences on rehabilitation counsellors' preference to work in rural areas, including their recruitment to, and retention in, rural work settings. Participants were 38 practicing rehabilitation counsellors (31% males) recruited through the Australian Society of Rehabilitation Counsellors and the Rehabilitation Counselling Association of Australasia. The mean age of participants was 38.67 years (SD = 12.9 years, age range, 25 to 65 years). Nineteen (50%) were working in rural areas at the time of the survey. A specifically designed survey, the Work Setting Preference Inventory (WSPI), which incorporated both quantitative and qualitative response options, was used to collect data. Analysis involved open coding of data into themes that emerged from the participants' responses. Descriptive statistical analysis was applied to quantify the prevalence or salience of particular themes. Results suggest that participants perceived preference to work in rural area to be influenced by the unique lifestyle of rural communities and family friendly employer policies. They perceived the availability of employment and training opportunities and supplemental financial compensations as incentives to attract rehabilitation counsellors to work in rural areas. Programs to recruit rehabilitation counsellors to rural areas should address employee lifestyle preferences in the context their overall career development.
    06/2011; 17(01). DOI:10.1375/jrc.17.1.1
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: A substantial literature engaging with the directions and experiences of stakeholders involved in interprofessional health education exists at the international level, yet almost nothing has been published that documents and analyses the Australian experience. Accordingly, this study aimed to scope the experiences of key stakeholders in health and higher education in relation to the development of interprofessional practice capabilities in health graduates in Australia. Twenty-seven semi-structured interviews and two focus groups of key stakeholders involved in the development and delivery of interprofessional health education in Australian higher education were undertaken. Interview data were coded to identify categories that were organised into key themes, according to principles of thematic analysis. Three themes were identified: the need for common ground between health and higher education, constraints and enablers in current practice, and the need for research to establish an evidence base. Five directions for national development were also identified. The study identified a range of interconnected changes that will be required to successfully mainstream interprofessional education within Australia, in particular, the importance of addressing issues of culture change and the need for a nationally coordinated and research informed approach. These findings reiterate those found in the international literature.
    Australian health review: a publication of the Australian Hospital Association 05/2011; 35(2):136-40. DOI:10.1071/AH10886 · 1.00 Impact Factor
  • Justin Newton Scanlan · Anita C Bundy · Lynda R Matthews
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This study set out to explore the differences in time use between 'unemployed', 'unemployed but in education' and part-time and full-time employed 18- to 25-year-old Australians. Unemployed individuals generally experience poor health and this may be related to the way they use their time. Activity-based interventions may be one health-promoting strategy. This knowledge is important for all occupational therapists, as many service users are likely to be unemployed. Time use of unemployed 18- to 25-year-olds (measured using the Modified Occupational Questionnaire) was compared with the time use of part- and full-time employed 18- to 25-year-olds (from the 2006 Australian Time Use Survey). Individuals in the 'unemployed' groups spent significantly less time engaged in work-related activities than their employed peers. This time was reallocated mainly to recreation and leisure and household work (for both men and women) and child care and sleeping (women only). Recreation and leisure activities were generally passive, home-based activities such as watching television or 'doing nothing'. Individuals in the 'unemployed but in education' groups also spent less time in employment-related activities, but the majority of this time was reallocated to education activities. Individuals in the 'unemployed' groups spent large amounts of time engaged in potentially non-directed use of time (e.g. watching television or 'doing nothing'). Such patterns of time use have previously been associated with poor health. To support the health of unemployed individuals more effectively, occupational therapy interventions must focus on enhancing the quality of time use for this population.
    Australian Occupational Therapy Journal 04/2011; 58(2):111-9. DOI:10.1111/j.1440-1630.2010.00879.x · 0.83 Impact Factor

10 Following View all

56 Followers View all