Kay W. Eilbert

DrPH
Director of Public Health
London Borough of Merton · Public Health

Publications

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    ABSTRACT: This paper reports on an innovative whole-systems approach to improving uptake of breast screening in Tower Hamlets, a deprived borough in the East End of London with a large minority ethnic population. The approach, developed by the public health team at NHS Tower Hamlets, draws on analysis of needs and existing literature about effective interventions to promote breast screening. Social marketing research led to a campaign targeted at Bangladeshi women, together with a range of initiatives to promote breast screening through primary care services and community outreach through local well-known organisations. The breast screening service itself was upgraded and a new service specification is being introduced from April 2009.
    British Journal of Cancer 12/2009; 101 Suppl 2:S64-7. · 5.08 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose – This paper aims to measure access to food in an inner London borough. Design/methodology/approach – There were six phases, which included designing food baskets, consultation with local residents and a shop survey. Recognising the cultural make-up of the borough food baskets and menus were developed for four key communities, namely: White British, Black Caribbean, Turkish, and Black African. Three areas were identified for the study and shopping hubs identified with a 500-metre radius from a central parade of shops. Findings – The findings paint an intricate web of interactions ranging from availability in shops to accessibility and affordability being key issues for some groups. It was found that in the areas studied there was availability of some key healthy items, namely fresh fruit and vegetables, but other items such as: fresh meat and poultry, fish, lower fat dairy foods, high fibre pasta and brown rice were not available. Access was found to be defined, by local people, as more extensive than just physical distance to/from shops – for many shopping was made more difficult by having to use taxis and inconvenient buses. Small shops were important in delivering healthy food options to communities in areas of deprivation and were judged to offer a better range and more appropriate food than the branches of the major supermarket chains. Research limitations/implications – The importance of monitoring the impact of shops and shop closures on healthy food availability is emphased. From a policy perspective the findings suggest that approaches based on individual agency need to be balanced with upstream public health nutrition approaches in order to influence the options available. Originalty/value – The paper is arguably the first to examine and dissect the issue of food availability and accessibility in the inner London borough in question, especially in the light of its proposed redevelopment for the London Olympics in 2012.
    British Food Journal 05/2009; 111(5):452-474. · 0.61 Impact Factor
  • Kay W. Eilbert, Vincent Lafronza
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    ABSTRACT: This article describes research to improve the practice of organizational affiliation in community health improvement efforts. The model brings together systems and institutional theories to study affiliation as an organizational issue, along with the relevant public health literature. It was tested against practice in two sites and revised to reflect feedback from research participants that was confirmed in the literature.Case studies describe how each site adopted a form of affiliation other than partnership. Lessons learned included the importance of marrying public health research with the management and organization development literature for the study of organizational affiliation, the need for flexibility in developing a model to address organizational affiliation, and the need for local ownership to ensure maximum benefit. Recommendations include further research to refine elements of the model and a ‘partnership’ of practitioners, researchers, and funding agencies to use the model in feasibility and evaluation studies of affiliation efforts.
    Evaluation and Program Planning 05/2005; · 0.90 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The Public Health Foundation (PHF), under contract to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service (PHS), worked with federal, state, and local public health, mental health, substance abuse, and environmental agencies in nine states to develop and successfully test a methodology for estimating investments in essential public health services. Estimates from the nine-state sample revealed the predominance of personal health expenditures in the public health system. Of total state health care dollars, only 1 percent was spent on population-based health services by participating agencies. This pilot provides a rational starting point toward a uniform methodology for highlighting public health expenditures that may be critical in revealing the effects of a changing health care environment on the nation's health. In combination with other data, results are expected to lead to a more informed policy-making process.
    Journal of public health management and practice: JPHMP 06/1997; 3(3):1-9. · 1.47 Impact Factor
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    Kay W. Eilbert
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    ABSTRACT: Typescript. Thesis (Ph. D.)--George Washington University, 2003. Includes bibliographical references.

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