Publications

  • Microsurgery 04/2014; · 1.62 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Eagle syndrome, also known as elongated styloid process, is a condition first described by Watt Eagle in 1937. It occurs when an elongated styloid process or calcified stylohyoid ligament causes recurrent throat pain or foreign body sensation, dysphagia, or facial pain. Additional symptoms may include neck or throat pain with radiation to the ipsilateral ear. It is usually hard to diagnose because the symptoms related to this condition can be confused with those attributed to a wide variety of facial neuralgias. In this article, a case of Eagle syndrome exhibiting unilateral symptoms with bilateral elongation of styloid process is reported.
    The Journal of craniofacial surgery 01/2014; 25(1):e84-6. · 0.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Full face transplantation is a complex procedure and a detailed plan is needed. Coaptation of motor nerve branches at more distal sites instead of the level of the main trunk is highly desirable, but may be difficult to find, are thin, fragile and have limited length for safe and tension-free coaptation. In addition, nerve grafts may be necessary. In this study, the technical feasibility of facial allotransplantation procurement using a transparotid approach was investigated. Three mock cadaver dissections were performed, procuring full face transplants with en bloc facial nerve dissection. The facial nerve (main trunk, temporofacial/cervicofacial divisions, and individual facial branches) was elevated en bloc as part of the allograft, dissected out from the parotid completely, and left as loose attachments to the allograft specimen. Full face transplantation with en bloc facial nerve dissection was technically feasible, allowing for more proximal or distal nerve section, and to achieve the desired length and diameter for appropriate matching during nerve coaptation. This technique follows principles of targeted nerve reinnervation. It allows to select the level of facial nerve section to the temporofacial and cervicofacial divisions or final branches, with further adaptation to the remaining recipient's anatomic structures, and avoiding the need for nerve grafts; it also excludes the parotid gland (reduces bulk). Despite a small increase in the time required for dissection, this disadvantage may be compensated by an improved functional recovery. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Microsurgery, 2013.
    Microsurgery 12/2013; · 1.62 Impact Factor
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    Plastic &amp Reconstructive Surgery 11/2013; 132(5):873. · 3.54 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Introduction: The rat is probably the animal species most widely used in experimental studies on nerve repair. The aim of this work was to contribute to a better understanding of the morphology and blood supply of the rat brachial plexus. Material and Methods: Thirty adult rats were studied regarding brachial plexus morphology and blood supply. Intravascular injection and dissection under an operating microscope, as well as light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy techniques were used to define the microanatomy of the rat brachial plexus and its vessels. Results: The rat brachial plexus was slightly different from the human brachial plexus. The arterial and venous supply to the brachial plexus plexus was derived directly or indirectly from neighboring vessels. These vessels formed dense and interconnected plexuses in the epineurium, perineurium, and endoneurium. Several brachial plexus components were accompanied for a relatively long portion of their length by large and constant blood vessels that supplied their epineural plexus, making it possible to raise these nerves as flaps. Discussion: The blood supply to the rat brachial plexus is not very different from that reported in humans, making the rat a useful animal model for the experimental study of peripheral nerve pathophysiology and treatment. Conclusion: Our results support the homology between the rat and the human brachial plexus in terms of morphology and blood supply. This work suggests that several components of the rat brachial plexus can be used as nerve flaps, including predominantly motor, sensory or mixed nerve fibers. This information may facilitate new experimental procedures in this animal model.
    Acta medica portuguesa 10/2013; 26(3):243-50. · 0.15 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Epithelial–myoepithelial carcinoma (EMC) is a rare tumour of the salivary glands typically arising in the parotid. It is recognized as a low-grade malignant tumour that is prone to local recurrence and may metastasise. We report on a case of EMC of the parotid gland that recurred three times in a 16-month period. Although tumour resections were performed in each recurrence and tumour-free margins were always obtained, the patient died nearly 9 years after the initial diagnosis with brain metastases. Diagnosis, clinical behaviour and treatment of EMC are also reviewed. Level of Evidence: Level V, therapeutic study
    European Journal of Plastic Surgery 10/2013; 6(36):723-728.
  • Journal of Reconstructive Microsurgery 10/2013; · 1.00 Impact Factor
  • Plastic &amp Reconstructive Surgery 09/2013; 132(3):479e-80e. · 3.54 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Lehman syndrome, or lateral meningocele syndrome, is characterized by facial dysmorphism, multiple lateral meningoceles, and skeletal abnormalities. Only nine cases have been described. We present a case of a 2-year-old boy presenting with micrognathia, glossoptosis, and hypertelorism as well as associated severe obstructive sleep apnea. He was submitted to bilateral mandibular distraction with external nonresorbable devices to correct Pierre Robin sequence (PRS). Later, multiple lateral meningoceles were identified, and a diagnosis of Lehman syndrome was made. Lehman syndrome must be considered in syndromic infants with PRS. Distraction osteogenesis is a safe procedure that is effective as a first choice in the treatment of patients with Lehman syndrome presenting with micrognathia.
    The Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Journal 08/2013; · 1.24 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Replantation is the gold standard surgical treatment of amputations of the upper limb; however, this demanding procedure is not always preformed in bilateral limb amputation. The objective of this study was to analyze, sixyears after surgery, the sensorimotor recovery of both replanted hands. A 21-year-old patient with bilateral hand amputation was benefited from limb replantation. Surgery included debridement of the amputated hands and recipient's stumps, bone fixation, arterial and venous anastomoses, nerve sutures, tendon sutures and skin closure. Rehabilitation program included physiotherapy, electrostimulation and occupational therapy. Sensory and motor evaluation was performed 6years after replantation. At 6years, the patient presented a good/satisfactory recovery of range of motion and strength, better at right hand. The patient was able to perform right thumb opposition. Static two-point discrimination was 20mm, sensitivity to pain and thermal stimuli and ability to sweat were present on both hands. Reinnervation was confirmed by electromyography. Functional recovery was higher at the right hand when compared to the left hand. He was highly satisfied with the result of surgery for right hand and fairly satisfied with the result for left hand. He was able to return to a secretary work 16months after the accident. A proper functional result can be accomplished with bilateral hand replantation.
    Chirurgie de la Main 07/2013; · 0.30 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: : Scarpa fascia preservation has been suggested as a way of reducing complications associated with conventional abdominoplasty. A prospective randomized study was conducted to evaluate the effect on results and complications of preserving the Scarpa fascia during a full abdominoplasty. : This was a single-center study conducted from August of 2009 to February of 2011. Patients were assigned randomly to one of two procedures: classic full abdominoplasty (group A) or a similar type of abdominoplasty except for the preservation of the Scarpa fascia and the deep fat compartment in the infraumbilical area (group B). Four surgeons were involved in the study. Several variables were determined: general characteristics, time to suction drain removal, total volume of drain output, length of hospital stay, systemic complications, local complications, and aesthetic result. : A total of 160 full abdominoplasties were performed in women (group A, 80 patients; group B, 80 patients) equally divided by the four involved surgeons. There were no statistically significant differences between groups with respect to general characteristics, complications (except for the seroma rate), and aesthetic result. The Scarpa fascia preservation group had a highly significant reduction of 65.5 percent on the total drain output, 3 days on the time to drain removal, and 86.7 percent on the seroma rate. : Preservation of the Scarpa fascia during an abdominoplasty had a beneficial effect on patient recovery, as it reduced the total drain output, time to drain removal, and seroma rate without compromising the aesthetic result. : Therapeutic, I.
    Plastic &amp Reconstructive Surgery 03/2013; 131(3):644-51. · 3.54 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The etiology and clinical treatment of capsular contracture remain unresolved as the causes may be multifactorial. Triamcinolone acetonide applied in the pocket during surgery was reported to be ineffective in prevention of capsular contracture. However, if injected 4-6 weeks after surgery or as a treatment for capsular contracture, decreased applanation tonometry measurements and pain were observed. It was assumed that intraoperative application of triamcinolone was not effective because its effect does not last long enough. However, betadine, antibiotics, and fibrin were found to be effective in preventing capsular contracture with intraoperative applications and are more effective in the early phases of wound healing than in later stages. The role of triamcinolone acetonide in capsule formation is unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine if triamcinolone acetonide modulates breast capsule formation or capsular contracture in the early phases of wound healing in a rabbit model. Rabbits (n=19) were implanted with one tissue expander and two breast implants and were killed at 4 weeks. Implant pocket groups were (1) Control (n=10) and (2) Triamcinolone (n=9). Pressure/volume curves and histological, immunological, and microbiological evaluations were performed. Operating room air samples and contact skin samples were collected for microbiological evaluation. In the triamcinolone group, a decreased capsular thickness, mild and mononuclear inflammation, and negative or mild angiogenesis were observed. There were no significant differences in intracapsular pressure, fusiform cell density, connective tissue, organization of collagen fibers, and microbiological results between the groups. There was no significant difference in the dialysate levels of IL-8 and TNF-α, but correlation between IL-8 and TNF-α was observed. Triamcinolone acetonide during breast implantation influences early capsule formation and may reduce capsular contracture. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE III: This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors at www.springer.com/00266.
    Aesthetic Plastic Surgery 04/2012; 36(4):986-94. · 1.26 Impact Factor
  • Plastic &amp Reconstructive Surgery 01/2012; 130(5S):82(S)-89(S). · 3.54 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Microsurgical hand reconstruction can be the first option to consider in some particular and complex clinical situations. An algorithm based on anatomical considerations and functional outcomes, may be useful for the plastic surgeon that deals with these challenging cases.
    jornal of hand and microsurgery. 12/2011; 3(2):73-7.
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    ABSTRACT: Treatment of microstomia, whether congenital or acquired, has long challenged the ingenuity of surgeons. In all instances, the challenge remains the ability to preserve function and provide and maintain reasonable aesthetics. The following case report presents 2 different cases of surgical correction of microstomia, resulting from flap reconstructions after perioral tumor surgery. We developed a technique that uses pericommissural mucomuscular advancement flap, "a simple fishtail flap," and used this to correct deformed oral commissures in an attempt to elongate the oral aperture in a functional and aesthetically acceptable manner without recurrence. Results have shown that, with the use of our fishtail design, we can restore the unique architecture of the oral commissure with the postoperative intercommissural distance improved by more than 10 mm and the interincisal width enlarged by approximately 5 mm. Our solution was functional and aesthetically acceptable, as well as simpler and cheaper, in comparison with the traditional surgical methods that are usually expensive, complex, and less practical. We believe that, in cases in which either the contracture is mild or a commissurotomy can be expected to increase the width and the general size of the oral aperture, this relatively conservative technique, if judiciously used, can be performed with ease and safety with good results.
    The Journal of craniofacial surgery 11/2011; 22(6):2292-4. · 0.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: An abstract is unavailable. This article is available as HTML full text and PDF.
    Plastic &amp Reconstructive Surgery 09/2011; 128(4S):61. · 3.54 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The mechanism(s) responsible for breast capsular contracture (CC) remain unknown, but inflammatory pathways play a role. Various molecules have been attached to implant shells in the hope of modifying or preventing CC. The intrinsic antibacterial and antifungal activities of chitosan and related oligochitosan molecules lend themselves well to the study of the infectious hypothesis; chitosan's ability to bind to growth factors, its hemostatic action, and its ability to activate macrophages, cause cytokine stimulation, and increase the production of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 allow study of the hypertrophic scar hypothesis. The authors perform a comprehensive evaluation, in a rabbit model, of the relationship between CC and histological, microbiological, and immunological characteristics in the presence of a chitooligosaccharide (COS) mixture and a low molecular weight chitosan (LMWC). Eleven adult New Zealand rabbits were each implanted with three silicone implants: a control implant, one impregnated with COS, and one impregnated with LMWC. At four-week sacrifice, microdialysates were obtained in the capsule-implant interfaces for tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-8 (IL-8) level assessment. Histological and microbiological analyses were performed. Baker grade III/IV contractures were observed in the LMWC group, with thick capsules, dense connective tissue, and decreased IL-8 levels (p < .05) compared to control and COS groups. Capsule tissue bacterial types and microdialysate TNF-α levels were similar among all groups. Chitosan-associated silicone implantation in a rabbit model resulted in Baker grade III/IV CC. This preclinical study may provide a model to test various mechanistic hypotheses of breast capsule formation and subsequent CC.
    Aesthetic Surgery Journal 07/2011; 31(5):540-50. · 1.56 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Traumatic auricular amputation due to human bite is not a common event, but it constitutes a difficult challenge for the reconstructive surgeon. Microsurgery can be performed in some cases, but replantation of a severed ear without microsurgery can be a safe alternative. We present a case of a 44-year-old male individual who was involved in a fight and sustained a human bite, resulting in almost a complete amputation of his right ear. The Baudet technique has been used successfully. It is a simple technique and very reliable because it allows a great surface of contact between the graft and the vascular bed, substantially increasing its odds of survival in cases presenting with high risk of infection such as human bite injury. It also produces excellent aesthetic results.
    The Journal of craniofacial surgery 07/2011; 22(4):1457-9. · 0.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The etiology and ideal clinical treatment of capsular contracture (CC) remain unresolved. Bacteria, especially coagulase-negative staphylococci, have been previously shown to accelerate the onset of CC. The role of fibrin in capsule formation has also been controversial. The authors investigate whether fibrin and coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) modulate the histological, microbiological, and clinical outcomes of breast implant capsule formation in a rabbit model and evaluate contamination during the surgical procedure. Thirty-one New Zealand white female rabbits were each implanted with one tissue expander and two breast implants. The rabbits received (1) untreated implants and expanders (control; n = 10), (2) two implants sprayed with 2 mL of fibrin and one expander sprayed with 0.5 mL of fibrin (fibrin; n = 11), or (3) two implants inoculated with 100 µL of a CoNS suspension (10(8)CFU/mL-0.5 density on the McFarland scale) and one expander inoculated with a CoNS suspension of 2.5 × 10(7) CFU/mL (CoNS; n = 10). Pressure/volume curves and histological and microbiological evaluations were performed. Operating room air samples and contact skin samples were collected for microbiological evaluation. The rabbits were euthanized at four weeks. In the fibrin group, significantly decreased intracapsular pressures, thinner capsules, loose/dense (<25%) connective tissue, and negative/mild angiogenesis were observed. In the CoNS group, increased capsular thicknesses and polymorph-type inflammatory cells were the most common findings. Similar bacteria in capsules, implants, and skin were cultured from all the study groups. One Baker grade IV contracture was observed in an implant infected with Micrococcus spp. Fibrin was associated with reduced capsule formation in this preclinical animal model, which makes fibrin an attractive potential therapeutic agent in women undergoing breast augmentation procedures. Clinical strategies for preventing bacterial contamination during surgery are crucial, as low pathogenic agents may promote CC.
    Aesthetic Surgery Journal 05/2011; 31(4):420-8. · 1.56 Impact Factor
  • International Journal of Gynecological Cancer 04/2011; 21(3):565-7. · 1.94 Impact Factor

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