Jean-Michel Kornprobst

Chemistry, Education, Medicine

PhD, Engineer in chemistry
33.38

Publications

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    Jean-Michel Kornprobst, Stéphane La Barre
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    ABSTRACT: Editorial Public interest in substances with marine origin is very recent in comparison to that of terrestrial plants that dates back to our origins as nomadic hunter-gatherers. Our ancestors made the distinction between edible plants -some of which they eventually cultivated as humans became sedentary -and toxic substances that could serve as remedies once properly prepared and administered during special ceremonies by medicine men who are still highly respected in existing tribal systems worldwide. Several paralyzing substances and venoms were (and still are) used as aids for game hunting. Other neuroactive substances, mostly from toxic mushrooms, have been traditionally used as entrancing agents by witch doctors and more recently by westerners in search of mind-expanding (or mind-blowing) experiences. Marine ethnopharmacology, on the other hand, has no real historical background except for isolated examples e.g. the use reported centuries ago of the red alga domoi as cure against roundworm infestation in Japanese infants. Traditional non health-oriented uses of marine substances are also uncommon, such as that of toxic holothurian skin exudates by Filippino fishermen to facilitate catches of coral reef fish. Research on marine natural substances unfolds under three different periods, each of which brings its significant contribution to knowledge and human welfare. This is fuelled by scientific curiosity, facilitated by novel technologies, and sometimes hastened by health issues.
  • Jean-Michel Kornprobst
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    ABSTRACT: The article contains sections titled:Taxonomic Position of Thraustochytrids and Overview of the GroupCarotenoids of ThraustochytridsLong-Chain (n-3) Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids of ThraustochytridsLong-Chain Fatty Acid Composition and Phylogeny of Thraustochytridsα-Glucosylceramides of ThraustochytridsExtracellular EnzymesIntroduction to the Chemistry of CiliatesTerpenes of EuplotesPhotoreceptor PigmentsKeronopsins and Keronopsamides of Pseudokeronopsis rubra and P. riciiKeywords:Carotenoids;chlorophyll endosymbionts;docosahexaenoic acid (DHA);eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA);ex-vivo HPLC;α-glucosylceramides;long-chain (n-3) polyunsaturated fatty acids;terpenes
    Encyclopedia of Marine Natural Products, 08/2014: pages 1-10; , ISBN: 9783527334292
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    Stéphane La Barre, Jean-Michel Kornprobst
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    ABSTRACT: Using a number of outstanding examples, this text introduces readers to the immense variety of marine natural compounds, the methodologies to characterize them, and the approaches to explore their industrial potential. Care is also taken to discuss the function and ecological context of the compounds. Meticulously produced and easy to read, this book serves students and professionals wishing to familiarize themselves with the field, and is ideally suited as a course book for both industry and academia.
    1 edited by Stéphane LA BARRE & jean-Michel KORNPROBST, 04/2014; Wiley Blackwell., ISBN: 978-3-527-33465-0
  • Jean-Michel Kornprobst
    2d 04/2014; Wiley-Blackwell., ISBN: 978-3-527-33429-2
  • Marie-Lise Bourguet-Kondracki, Jean-Michel Kornprobst
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    ABSTRACT: An overview into recently identified promising marine natural products or derivatives is provided. The pipeline includes unique chemical entities from marine microorganisms, macroalgae and marine invertebrates, as well as synthetic derivatives. This glimpse into the future of marine natural products offers particular insight into the development of anticancer compounds with original mechanisms of action, a novel potent anti-HIV strategy, and new hopes for the treatment of asthma or neurological and Alzheimer's diseases. At the start of the twenty-first century, the field of marine molecules continues to provide an exciting source of new and highly potent pharmaceuticals.
    Outstanding Marine Molecules, 03/2014: pages 243-264; , ISBN: 9783527334650
  • Cécile Debitus, Jean-Michel Kornprobst
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    ABSTRACT: Stalked crinoids were, for a long time, known as fossils found in different quarries, and also from ocean depths since the great expeditions of the eighteenth century. The chemical analyses of fossils and also of living organisms led to the discovery of new bioactive pigments, and also confirmed that the core structures of these pigments had been preserved during the fossilization process. The existence of these quinoid pigments also leads to several interesting questions related to their stereochemistry and the photoactivation of their bioactivity.
    Outstanding Marine Molecules, 03/2014: pages 163-170; , ISBN: 9783527334650
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    ABSTRACT: The marine sponge, Axinyssa djiferi, collected on mangrove tree roots in Senegal, was investigated for glycolipids. A mixture containing new glycosphingolipids, named axidjiferoside-A, -B and -C, accounted for 0.07% of sponge biomass (dry weight) and for 2.16% of total lipids. It showed a significant antimalarial activity, with a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 0.53 ± 0.2 μM against a chloroquine-resistant strain of Plasmodium falciparum. They were identified as homologous β-galactopyranosylceramides composed of 2-amino-(6E)-octadec-6-en-1,3,4-triol, and the major one, axidjiferoside-A (around 60%), contained 2-hydroxytetracosanoic acid. Cytotoxicity was studied in vitro on human cancer cell lines (multiple myeloma, colorectal adenocarcinoma, glioblastoma and two lung cancer NSCLC-N6 and A549). Results of this investigation showed that axidjiferosides are of interest, because they proved a good antiplasmodial activity, with only a low cytotoxicity against various human cell lines and no significant antitrypanosomal and antileishmanial activity. Thus, it seems that galactosylceramides with a β anomeric configuration may be suitable in searching for new antimalarial drugs.
    Marine Drugs 04/2013; 11(4):1304-15. DOI:10.3390/md11041304 · 3.51 Impact Factor
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  • Planta Medica 07/2012; 78(11). DOI:10.1055/s-0032-1320483 · 2.34 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Glycolipids of Myrmekioderma sponges contain Myrmekiosides, a new family of glycolipids with a unique structure of mono-O-alkyl-diglycosylglycerols. This report deals with the identification and biological activity of the new Myrmekioside E from Myrmekioderma dendyi. Its structure has been elucidated from spectroscopic data and chemical degradation studies. It contained a glycerol backbone linked to xylose and N-acetylglucosamine, and an alkyl long-chain with a terminal alcohol group. A related glycolipid, Trikentroside, known in the sponge Trikentrion laeve, was subjected to a comparative biological evaluation. Both glycolipids inhibit proliferation of two human non-small cell lung cancer cell lines (NSCLC-N6 and A549).
    European Journal of Medicinal Chemistry 03/2012; 49(30):406-10. DOI:10.1016/j.ejmech.2012.01.029 · 3.43 Impact Factor
  • Philippe Zawieja, Jean-Michel Kornprobst, Patrick Métais
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    ABSTRACT: 3-(2,4-dimethoxybenzylidene)-anabaseine is an analog of the paralytic alkaloid, anabaseine, from the ribbon worms Amphiporus sp., that shows numerous properties, in particular an agonist activity on alpha 7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. This article reviews these properties and explains to what extent they could be valuable to control symptomatology and/or neurodegeneration in Alzheimer's disease.
    Geriatrics & Gerontology International 02/2012; 12(3):365-71. DOI:10.1111/j.1447-0594.2011.00827.x · 1.58 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The starfish Narcissia canariensis harvested from the coasts off Dakar, Senegal, was investigated for glycolipids (GL). This report deals with the isolation, characterization and biological activity of a fraction F13-3 separated from the GL mixture and selected according to its ability to inhibit KB cell proliferation after 72 hours of treatment. Firstly, a GL mixture F13 was obtained that accounted for 1.36% of starfish biomass (dry weight) and 0.36% of total lipids. The fraction F13-3 obtained from F13 contained three homologous GL identified as peracetylated derivatives on the basis of chemical and spectroscopic evidence. These contained a β-glucopyranoside as sugar head, a 9-methyl-branched 4,8,10-triunsaturated long-chain aminoalcohol as sphingoid base and amide-linked 2-hydroxy fatty acid chains. The majority (63%) had an amide-linked 2-hydroxydocosanoic acid chain and was identified as the ophidiacerebroside-C, firstly isolated from the starfish Ophidiaster ophidiamus. The minor components of F13-3 differed by one more or one less methylene group, and corresponded to ophidiacerebroside-B and -D. We found that F13-3 displayed an interesting cytotoxic activity over 24 hours on various adherent human cancerous cell lines (multiple myeloma, colorectal adenocarcinoma and glioblastoma multiforme) with an IC(50) of around 20 μM.
    Marine Drugs 12/2010; 8(12):2988-98. DOI:10.3390/md8122988 · 3.51 Impact Factor
  • Jean‐Michel Kornprobst, Gilles Barnathan
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    ABSTRACT: ChemInform is a weekly Abstracting Service, delivering concise information at a glance that was extracted from about 100 leading journals. To access a ChemInform Abstract of an article which was published elsewhere, please select a “Full Text” option. The original article is trackable via the “References” option.
    ChemInform 11/2010; 30(48). DOI:10.1002/chin.199948289
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    Jean-Michel Kornprobst, Gilles Barnathan
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    ABSTRACT: The well-known fatty acids with a Δ5,9 unsaturation system were designated for a long period as demospongic acids, taking into account that they originally occurred in marine Demospongia sponges. However, such acids have also been observed in various marine sources with a large range of chain-lengths (C(16)-C(32)) and from some terrestrial plants with short acyl chains (C(18)-C(19)). Finally, the Δ5,9 fatty acids appear to be a particular type of non-methylene-interrupted fatty acids (NMA FAs). This article reviews the occurrence of these particular fatty acids in marine and terrestrial organisms and shows the biosynthetic connections between Δ5,9 fatty acids and other NMI FAs.
    Marine Drugs 10/2010; 8(10):2569-77. DOI:10.3390/md8102569 · 3.51 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Five new diterpenoids of the eunicellan class, labiatamides A-B (1,2) and labiatins A-C (3–5) have been isolated from the organic extract of the Senegalese gorgonian Eunicella labiata. A unique feature of labiatamides A and B (1,2) is the N-methyl acetamide group, an uncommon functionality in soft coral metabolites. Labiatin A (3), possesses an unprecedented ether linkage between C-2 and C-6. The structure elucidations of the new secondary metabolites were provided by comprehensive spectroscopic analyses. Labiatin B exhibited cytotoxic activity against human colon cancer cells (HCT-116) with ED50 = 0.85 μg/ml.
    ChemInform 06/2010; 27(25). DOI:10.1002/chin.199625193
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    ABSTRACT: An unusual sterolic mixture (82.3% of 24-isopropylated sterols) and its major component, 24-isopropylcholesterol, isolated from a marine sponge, Ciocalypta sp. (Halichondriidae), reduce cholesterol uptake, basolateral secretion and ACAT-2 mRNA expression and increase the expression of ABCA1 mRNA in Caco-2 cells. The decreases of cholesterol uptake and secretion induced by 24-isopropylcholesterol alone were more than that of both the sterolic mixture and beta-sitosterol. These data add a new sterol, 24-isopropylcholesterol, to sterols that may reduce intestinal cholesterol absorption.
    Journal of Cellular Biochemistry 06/2010; 106(4):659-65. DOI:10.1002/jcb.22047 · 3.37 Impact Factor
  • Jean-Michel Kornprobst
    04/2010; Wiley-Blackwell., ISBN: 978-3-527-32703-4
  • Gilles Boeuf, Jean-Michel Kornprobst
    Biofutur 07/2009; · 0.03 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The phospholipid fatty acid composition of the North-East Atlantic sponge Polymastia penicillus (South Brittany, France) was investigated. Sixty fatty acids (FA) were identified as methyl esters (FAME) and N-acyl pyrrolidides (NAP) by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS), including eight Delta5,9 unsaturated FA and three long-chain 2-hydroxylated FA. The major phospholipid FA were palmitic (14.3% of the total FA mixture), vaccenic (12.7%), 15(Z)-docosenoic (13.4%) and 5(Z),9(Z)-hexacosadienoic (13.3%) acids. In addition to the iso- and anteiso-branched saturated FA, several unusual short-chain branched saturated FA were identified. In addition to the known Delta5,9 FA, and interestingly regarding their identification by GC-MS as N-acyl pyrrolidides, was the co-occurrence of unusual FA possessing a Delta3, Delta4 and Delta5 double bond such as iso-4-pentadecenoic, iso-5-heptadecenoic, anteiso-5-heptadecenoic and two new compounds, not hitherto found in nature, namely 17-methyl-13-octadecenoic (0.8%) and 3,16-docosadienoic (1.1%) acids.
    Lipids 04/2009; 44(7):655-63. DOI:10.1007/s11745-009-3291-9 · 2.35 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The treatment of chemoresistant tumors represents an important challenge in the field of oncology. Primary or acquired overexpression of ATP-dependent transporters, in particular P-glycoprotein (Pgp, MDR1 protein), is a major cause of multidrug resistance and reduced patient survival. Sustained efforts have thereby been undertaken to find agents overcoming this resistance. This review provides a chemical and biological overview on bioactive metabolites from the marine field (natural molecules and analogues) that can overcome or circumvent resistance to ATP-dependent efflux pumps, their mechanisms of action and their structure-activity relationships. Their clinical relevance and status are presented. Active compounds (often microtubule-interacting agents) have been isolated from sponges and ascidians and, in lesser extent from cnidarians, and molluscs. The toxicity and the reversal activity can be uncoupled but, marine metabolites usually maintain high toxicity in multiresistant cancer cells. Certain display synergistic effects with clinically important anticancer drugs. The marine drug recently approved for cancer therapy [Trabectedin (Yondelis)] and those entered into clinical trials act on multiple targets and, circumvent or overcome chemoresistance through very unusual mechanisms of action. Pharmacological and clinical data suggest that metabolites from the marine field could provide new therapeutic options for patients with tumors resistant to conventional therapy.
    Anti-cancer agents in medicinal chemistry 01/2009; 8(8):886-903. DOI:10.2174/187152008786847729 · 2.94 Impact Factor

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