Publications

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    ABSTRACT: To estimate the short-term effectiveness, feasibility and acceptability of a smoking cessation intervention (the iQuit system) that consists of tailored printed and SMS text message self-help delivered as an adjunct to cessation support in primary care to inform the design of a definitive trial. A stratified two parallel group randomised controlled trial comparing usual care (Control) with usual care plus the iQuit system (Intervention), delivered by primary care nurses/healthcare assistants who were blinded to the allocation sequence. Thirty-two General Practice (GP) surgeries in England, UK. A total of 602 smokers initiating smoking cessation support from their local GP surgery were randomised (Control n=303, Intervention n=299). Primary outcome was self-reported two-week point prevalence abstinence at eight weeks follow-up. Secondary smoking outcomes and feasibility and acceptability measures were collected at four weeks after quit date, eight weeks and six months follow-up. There were no significant between-group differences in the primary outcome (Control 40.3%, iQuit 45.2%; OR = 1.22, 95% CI 0.88-1.69) or in secondary short-term smoking outcomes. Six-month prolonged abstinence was significantly higher in the iQuit arm (Control 8.9%, iQuit 15.1%; OR = 1.81, 95% CI 1.09-3.01). iQuit support took on average 7.7 minutes (SD 4.0) to deliver and 18.9% (95% CI 14.8-23.7%) of intervention participants discontinued the text message support during the programme. Tailored printed and text message self-help delivered alongside routine smoking cessation support in primary care does not significantly increase short-term abstinence but may increase long-term abstinence and demonstrated feasibility and acceptability compared with routine cessation support alone.
    Addiction 03/2014; · 4.58 Impact Factor
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    Felix Naughton, James Jamison, Stephen Sutton
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    ABSTRACT: SMS text messaging shows promise for delivering smoking cessation support. However, little is known about smokers' feelings towards receiving behavioural advice and support on their mobile phones. This article explores the attitudes of women with experience of prenatal smoking towards receiving pregnancy-related smoking cessation support by text message. Data collected by semi-structured interviews and focus group from women who received either tailored smoking cessation texts or no text support (N = 33) were analysed using thematic analysis. Three themes emerged: convenience, high expectations and perceived source. Texting was regarded as a highly convenient mode of support delivery leading to high levels of attention to messages, although high convenience sometimes resulted in the value of a text being short-lived. Many who did not receive texts had high expectations for text support to intervene with routine smoking behaviour in real time. Those who received texts (with no real-time intervention element), however, felt they were helpful and supportive. Participants discussed how factors relating to perceived source, including personalization, personal relevance and salience of text automatization, could affect message attention and impact. Our findings provide insight into how maximizing personalization and personal relevance can increase the value of text message support and reduce the risk of disengagement.
    Health Education Research 05/2013; · 1.66 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Primary care is an important setting for smoking cessation interventions. There is evidence for the effectiveness of tailored interventions for smoking cessation, and text messaging interventions for smoking cessation show promise. The intervention to be evaluated in this trial consists of two components: (1) a web-based program designed to be used by a practice nurse or other smoking cessation advisor (SCA); the program generates a cessation advice report that is highly tailored to relevant characteristics of the smoker; and (2) a three-month programme of automated tailored text messages sent to the smoker's mobile phone. The objectives of the trial are to assess the acceptability and feasibility of the intervention and to estimate the short-term effectiveness of the intervention in increasing the quit rate compared with usual care alone.Methods/design: The design is a two parallel group randomised controlled trial (RCT). 600 smokers who want to quit will be recruited in up to 30 general practices in the East of England. During a consultation with an SCA, they will be individually randomised by computer program to usual care (Control) or to usual care plus the iQuit system (Intervention). At the four-week follow-up appointment, the SCA will record smoking status and measure carbon monoxide level. There will be two further follow-ups, at eight weeks and six months from randomisation date, by postal questionnaire sent from and returned to the study centre or by telephone interview conducted by a research interviewer. The primary outcome will be self-reported abstinence for at least two weeks at eight weeks. A sample size of 300 per group would give 80% power to detect an increase in quit rate from 20% to 30% (alpha = 0.05, 2-sided test). The main analyses of quit rates will be conducted on an intention-to-treat basis, making the usual assumption that participants lost to follow up are smoking. DISCUSSION: This trial will focus on acceptability, feasibility and short-term effectiveness. The findings will be used to refine the intervention and to inform the decision to proceed to a pragmatic trial to estimate longer-term effectiveness and cost-effectiveness.Trial registration: Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN56702353.
    BMC Public Health 04/2013; 13(1):324. · 2.08 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Recent advances in technology have given rise to novel methods of delivering support to smokers wanting to quit. Mobile phone text messaging permits the delivery of quitting advice at any time, with little effort and at minimal cost. We examined smokers' attitudes toward text messaging as a tool to facilitate smoking cessation as well as preferences for message content and text delivery. Six focus groups were conducted from a total of 24 participants, with additional information obtained via paper questionnaire. Interaction with the text messaging system, tailoring message content and delivery, highlighting the positive effects of quitting, and offering encouragement by text were considered important features of a text support program. Future text messaging interventions may benefit from these findings.
    Journal of Applied Biobehavioral Research 01/2013; 18(1):1-23.
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    James Jamison, Stephen Sutton, Hazel Gilbert
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    ABSTRACT: Text messaging has emerged as a potentially useful tool to help smokers quit. This paper evaluates smokers' preferences for the Quittext program, which examines the feasibility and acceptability of delivering tailored smoking cessation advice via mobile phone text messaging. Thirty smokers completed a web-based smoking behavior questionnaire and received 6 weeks of tailored text messages. Feedback was obtained via questionnaires and semi-structured interviews. Smokers reported a preference for positive support, tailoring message content, and the ability to interact with the system. Delivering quitting advice by text message was considered feasible and acceptable. This research contributes to the literature, however, further intervention evaluation is warranted, with larger controlled studies needed to fully assess program feasibility and its effect on quit rates.
    Journal of Applied Biobehavioral Research 01/2012; 17(1):38-58.
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    J Jamison, L B Myers
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    ABSTRACT: To examine the theory of planned behaviour (TPB), as a framework for explaining binge drinking among young adults. One hundred and seventy-eight students in a cross-sectional design study completed self-report questionnaires examining attitudes to drinking, intention to drink and drinking behaviour in university. Binge drinking was defined for females (and males) as consuming 'four (males-five) or more pints of beer/glasses of wine/measures of spirits' in a single session. Drinking alcohol was common; 39.6% of males and 35.9% of females reported binge drinking. The TPB explained 7% of the variance in intention to drink. Overall, 43% of the variance in intention, 83% of the variance in total weekly consumption and 44% of the variance in binge drinking was explained. The frequency of drinking and the drinking behaviour of friends significantly predicted intention to drink and binge drinking, respectively. Binge drinkers were influenced by peers and social-situational factors. Pressure to drink was greater for males; undergraduates were influenced by the size of the drinking group, 'special offer' prices, and the availability of alcohol. The TPB appeared to be a weak predictor of student drinking but this may be a result of how constructs were measured. With friends' drinking behaviour emerging as a significant predictor of alcohol consumption, interventions seeking to reduce excessive drinking should target the role of peers and the university environment in which drinking occurs.
    Alcohol and Alcoholism 01/2008; 43(4):492-7. · 1.96 Impact Factor

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