Publications

  • Francis Schrag
    Cortex 06/2011; 47(9):1066-7. · 6.16 Impact Factor
  • Source
    Francis Schrag
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In this review essay, Francis Schrag focuses on two recent anthologies dealing completely or in part with the role of neuroscience in learning and education: The Jossey-Bass Reader on the Brain and Learning, edited by Jossey-Bass Publishers, and New Philosophies of Learning, edited by Ruth Cigman and Andrew Davis. Schrag argues that philosophers of education do have a distinctive role in the conversation about neuroscience. He contends that the impact of neuroscience is likely to be substantial, though not in the way its advocates imagine. It has the potential to enhance education by way of interventions that successfully alter the fundamental neural mechanisms of learning, but neuroscience is unlikely to affect classroom teaching substantially.
    Educational Theory 03/2011; 61(2):221 - 237.
  • Francis Schrag
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Like John Stuart Mill, I believe in the stimulating effects of grappling with texts designed to shake up one's own intellectual assumptions, and one contemporary author ideally suited to do that for most of us is Charles Murray. Murray is no philosopher but he's a clear, hard-headed thinker who enjoys confronting liberal academics (like myself) with unpleasant truths, as he sees them. Murray has been the bete noire of liberal education scholars since the 1994 publication of The Bell Curve: Intelligence and Class Structure in American Life, co-authored with Richard Herrnstein, which purported to show (inter alia) that compensatory education programs designed to erase the racial gap in achievement were doomed to failure (Herrnstein and Murray 1994). The current book, wisely I think, stays away from the topic of race altogether—but not from intelligence; though Murray, for obvious reasons, prefers the term ''academic ability'' here. At the core of Murray's book is the premise that academic accomplishment depends on academic ability, and that the latter is much less malleable than most of us, whom Murray labels ''educational romantics'' would like to believe. Such ''romantics,'' as Murray notes, predominate not just among liberals but in the Bush administration, and, indeed, among all backers of the No Child Left Behind law. Murray is effective in challenging reasons we might advance to demur from his fun- damental premise. For example, he provides a fair summary of recent intensive inter- ventions in the rearing of babies born into extremely unpropitious milieus. He does not deny that these experiments had a salutary impact on the children but his bottom line claim is this:
    Studies in Philosophy and Education 01/2009; 28(4):369-374. · 0.39 Impact Factor
  • FRANCIS SCHRAG
    Educational Theory 04/2007; 22(4):382 - 394.
  • Francis Schrag
    Educational Theory 01/2005; 46(2):151 - 159.
  • Francis Schrag
    Educational Theory 01/2005; 51(1):63 - 73.
  • Francis Schrag
    Educational Theory 01/2005; 44(3):361 - 369.
  • Francis Schrag
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Each of the authors discussed in this review essay deplores the attempts of scholars in the human sciences to ape their colleagues in the natural sciences and economics. Their criticisms are not dissimilar, nor are they without merit, but it is important to ask the following questions: What would they offer in its place? What kind of warrantability do the alternatives promise? Can researchers avoid the dominant paradigms and still have something valuable to say to policymakers? The bulk of the review focuses on Bent Flyvbjerg's Making Social Science Matter, the best-reasoned critique, and the one that offers the clearest alternative to the status quo.
    Educational Theory 01/2004; 54(1):89 - 101.
  • F. K. Schrag
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Evaluation of high stakes testing regimes must consider not simply mean test scores, but their distribution among students. Taking high school graduation tests and black and white student populations to illustrate the argument, I identify two criteria of success: a larger proportion of black high school graduates and a narrower gap between the two groups. I evaluate various possible distributions against these criteria. I then consider the question of which students merit our focused attention, those students who are furthest behind or those with the greatest likelihood of passing the test given extra help. A medical triage analogy suggests we should help the former, but I show here that the analogy is misplaced.
    Theory and Research in Education 01/2004; 2(3):255-262.
  • Francis Schrag
    Studies in Philosophy and Education 04/1999; 18(3):189-195. · 0.39 Impact Factor
  • Francis Schrag
    Studies in Philosophy and Education 12/1997; 17(1):29-46. · 0.39 Impact Factor
  • Francis Schrag
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Bereiter is right about the limitations of fact-based and Deweyian approaches to education, but his own approach has limitations as well: it views understanding too exclusively in scientific terms.
    Interchange 01/1992; 23(4):379-381.
  • Francis Schrag
    Criminal Justice Ethics 01/1991; 10(1):3-7.
  • Francis Schrag
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In recent years, the analysis of schooling from a Marxist perspective has become a thriving industry (Giroux, 1983).~ At the same time, efforts to interpret and defend Marx's historical materialism by a new generation of scholars and philosophers have won praise from Marxists and nonMarxists alike (Cohen, 1978; McMurtry, 1978; Rader, 1979; Shaw, 1978; Wood, 1981). 2 The inferences concerning education which may legitimately be drawn from historical materialism diverge significantly, I believe, from those asserted by Marxist educational writers who, in my opinion, lack an adequate grasp of that theory. In this paper, I attempt four tasks. After a necessarily brief exposition of the theory, I will identify its most important implications for the role of the school in capitalist society. Theia I will criticize Marxist analyses which attempt to explain the school's role in the reproduction of capitalist society. Finally, I will suggest a way in which the principal insights (though not the theory) of historical materialism may most fruitfully be put to use by educational scholars. My formulation of historical materialism is limited in more than one respect. I adopt a single interpretation, that of G. A. Cohen, knowing that alternative interpretations enjoy credibility. I justify my choice on several grounds: First, Cohen is widely regarded, even by those who disagree with him, as having produced an interpretation that is both forcefully argued and based on careful and detailed study of the Marxian corpus. Second, Cohen's interpretation suggests a way of looking at the educational enterprise that is significantly at odds with that of almost all educational writers who work in the Marxist tradition. Third, I believe that Cohen's work sets a standard which educational writers could profit from. He believes that the task of the philosophical exegete is not to cast historical materialism in a form which is either obscure or immune to appraisal. He believes, as I do, that historical materialism is worthy of defence because it captures a fundamental truth about history, not that it is fundamentally true because it has been cast in such a way that appraisal is impossible. My summary is also highly schematic, which constitutes another limitation. Realizing that no theory can be distilled to a few paragraphs without losing its richness, t try to capture the theory in its boldest outlines. I had better make one additional prefatory point. Marx provides both an explanatory theory and a political program, or at least guidelines for such a program. My concern, as well as Cohen's, is with the explanatory theory. If Marx's account of history is not correct, then it is hardly likely that a political program premised on that theory can succeed. If historical materialism is fundamentally correct, what political or educational program derives from it? Though these are important questions, I do not go into them here. Whether a theory provides the groundwork for a "politics of liberation," for an "emancipatory pedagogy," and whether a theory provides a valid account of the historical process are and ought to remain separable questions.
    Interchange 08/1986; 17(3):42-52.
  • Francis Schrag
    The Journal of Value Inquiry 05/1973; 7(2):96-105. · 0.08 Impact Factor
  • Francis Schrag
    Studies in Philosophy and Education 01/1973; 8(1):30-51. · 0.39 Impact Factor
  • Francis Schrag
    Studies in Philosophy and Education 32(2). · 0.39 Impact Factor

1 Following View all

2 Followers View all