Publications

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    ABSTRACT: This paper describes activities which have taken place within the UK institutional repository (IR) sector focusing on developing a community of practice through the sharing of experiences and best practice. This includes work done by the UK Council of Research Repositories (UKCoRR) and other bodies, together with informal activities, such as sharing the experience of organising Open Access Week events. The paper also considers future work to be undertaken by UKCoRR to continue developing the community.
    Open Repositories 2013; 07/2013
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    Brian Kelly
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    ABSTRACT: This paper summarises the approaches taken to the open analysis and interpretation of findings of surveys of the SEO (Search Engine Optimisation) characteristics of three institutional repositories provided by three Russell Group universities in the UK.
    Open Repositories 2013; 07/2013
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    Brian Kelly, Paul Hollins
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    ABSTRACT: The JISC Observatory provides horizon-scanning of technological developments which may be of relevant for the UK’s higher and further education sectors. The JISC Observatory team has developed systematic processes for the scanning, sense-making and synthesis activities for the work. This paper summarises the JISC Observatory work and related activities carried out by the authors. The paper outlines how the processes can be applied in a local context to ensure that institutions are able to gather evidence in a systematic way and understand and address the limitations of evidence-gathering processes. The paper describes use of open processes for interpreting the evidence and suggests possible implications of the horizon-scanning activities for policy-making and informing operational practices. The paper concludes by encouraging take-up of open approaches in gathering and interpretation of evidence used to inform policy-making in an institutional context.
    Umbrella 2013; 07/2013
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    Brian Kelly
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    ABSTRACT: In this invited paper the author summarises the benefits which can be gained from use of social media to support research activities. The paper is based on personal experiences in using social media to engage with fellow researchers, meet new collaborators and co-authors and enhance awareness and impact of research papers.
    06/2013;
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    B Kelly, J. Delasalle
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    ABSTRACT: The deployment of institutional repository services has focussed on the development of services for managing content within the organisation or by a trusted agency. At the same time we have seen developments to support management of the use of metadata to maximize access to content hosted in repositories. Related technical approaches, such as 'cool URIs' can also make content more discoverable by search engines such as Google. In parallel we are witnessing the increasing take-up of a range of third-party services such as LinkedIn and Academia which are being used by researchers to publish information related to their professional activities, including details of their research publications. The paper provides evidence which suggests that personal use of such services can increase the number of downloads by increasing SEO (Search Engine Optimisation) rankings through inbound links from highly ranked web sites. A survey of use of such services across Russell Group universities shows the popularity of a number of social media services. In the light of existing usage of these services this paper proposes that institutional encouragement of their use by researchers may generate increased accesses to institutional research publications at little cost to the institution. This paper concludes by describing further work which is planned in order to investigate the SEO characteristics of institutional repositories.
    Open Repositories 2012; 07/2012
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    ABSTRACT: Increasingly there is a need for quantitative evidence in order to help demonstrate the value of online services. Such evidence can also help to detect emerging patterns of usage and identify associated operational best practice. This paper seeks to initiate a discussion on approaches to metrics for institutional repositories by providing a high-level overview of the benefits of metrics for a variety of stakeholders. The paper outlines the potential benefits which can be gained from providing richer statistics related to the use of institutional repositories and also reviews related work in this area. The authors describe a JISC-funded project which harvested a large number of repositories in order to identify patterns of use of metadata attributes and summarise the key findings. The paper provides a case study which reviews plans to provide a richer set of statistics within one institutional repository as well as requirements from the researcher community. An example of how third-party aggregation services may provide metrics on behalf of the repository community is given. The authors conclude with a call for repository managers, developers and policy makers to be pro-active in providing open access to metrics for open repositories.
    Open Repositories 2012; 07/2012
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    ABSTRACT: This paper argues that web accessibility is not an intrinsic characteristic of a digital resource but is determined by complex political, social and other contextual factors, as well as technical aspects which are the focus of WAI standardisation activities. It can therefore be inappropriate to develop legislation or focus on metrics only associated with properties of the resource. The authors describe the value of standards such as BS 8878 which focus on best practices for the process of developing web products and include a user focus. The paper concludes with a case study that illustrates how learning analytics could provide data to support the improvement of the inclusivity of learning resources, providing a broader perspective beyond the digital resource.
    W4A 2012; 04/2012
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    B Kelly
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    ABSTRACT: We are continuing to see rapid technological developments taking place which will affect those working in the library sector. But unlike the technological developments we saw in the mid-1990s following the release of the Web and its acceptance as a transformative technology, we are now in the midst of significant political and funding changes which will affect the working practices of those working in the information profession. This paper describes recent work sponsored by the JISC Innovation Support Centres, UKOLN and CETIS, which produced a Technology Outlook for UK Tertiary Education 2011-2016 report on technology developments which are felt to have a time-to-adoption horizon of one year or less; two to three years or four to five years. The paper introduces the technologies mentioned in the report and invites discussion on the implications for those working in libraries and as information specialists.
    Internet Librarian International 2011; 01/2011
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    B Kelly
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    ABSTRACT: Whilst the importance of open access to scholarly content is widely appreciated, difficulties in changing established practices and agreeing on new business models provide barriers to greater provision of open scholarly content. However content which is created by librarians and information professionals need not be affected by issues such as publisher agreements, business models for peer-reviewing, etc. There is therefore an opportunity for those involved in the provision of library services to be pro-active in allowing content developed within the organisation to be made freely available for reuse by others. Training and user support materials provide one area in which a willingness to share resources should provide benefits to those working in the public sector in particular, in light of the significant reductions in funding we are currently seeing. In addition to conventional text-based resources the widespread availability of mobile devices and the growing ubiquity of WiFi networks are making it possible to share access to live events or to record such events and make recordings freely available to others. This paper provides a summary of recent experiences in the provision of amplified events in order to maximise access to events and the ideas discussed at events. We are now starting to see such events move beyond experimentation by early adopters and the provision of an event amplification infrastructure becoming increasingly by professionals who are seeking ways of developing their professional skills beyond traditional physical attendance at events. The paper describes how the librarian's role in sharing access to knowledge and resources can develop into sharing knowledge and expertise with peers across the sector by being willing to be active content providers in amplified events.
    Online Information 2011; 01/2011
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    B. Kelly, D. Sloan
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    ABSTRACT: This paper argues that, as we move towards a 'post-digital' world where use of the Web becomes normalised, there is a need to address Web accessibility measurement challenges within a wider real-world context. Strategy and policy that defines Web accessibility purely by the conformance of digital resources with technical guidelines can lead to a danger that 'good enough' solutions may fail to be deployed; they also fail to consider a wider measure of user experience in accessibility measurement. We propose that metrics should draw on aspects of user experience to provide a more meaningful, real-world measure of the impact (or not) of accessibility barriers and therefore priority in addressing them. Metrics should also consider context in terms of the quality of effort taken by organisations to provide an inclusive experience; one option for doing so is the framework provided by British Standard 8878 Code of Practice for Web Accessibility. In both cases, challenges exist in the complexity of defining and implementing such metrics.
    W3C WAI RDWG Symposium on Website Accessibility Metrics, Online Symposium 5 December 2011.; 01/2011
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    ABSTRACT: Practical advice to web managers and records managers about the preservation of web resources (including web pages, web-based applications and websites).
    Edited by Susan Farrell, 06/2010; UKOLN / ULCC.
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    ABSTRACT: Twitter is widely used in a range of different contexts, ranging from informal social communications and marketing purposes through to supporting various professional activities in teaching and learning and research. The growth in Twitter use has led to a recognition of the need to ensure that Twitter posts ('tweets') can be accessed and reused by a variety of third party applications. This paper describes development work to the Twapper Keeper Twitter archiving service to support use of Twitter in education and research. The reasons for funding developments to an existing commercial service are described and the approaches for addressing the sustainability of such developments are provided. The paper reviews the challenges this work has addressed including the technical challenges in processing large volumes of traffic and the policy issues related, in particular, to ownership and copyright. The paper concludes by describing the experiences gained in using the service to archive tweets posted during the WWW 2010 conference and summarising plans for further use of the service.
    7th International Conference on Preservation of Digital Objects (iPRES 2010); 01/2010
  • Brian Kelly
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    ABSTRACT: Brian Kelly was the co-chair of UKOLN’s annual Institutional Web Management Workshop, IWMW 2010 which was held at the Univerity of Sheffield in the UK on 12-14 July 2010. In addition to the 170+ participants at the event a remote audience viewed the live streaming video of the plenary talks, browsed the speakers’ slides which were hosted on Slideshare and participated in the ‘back channel’ discussions on Twitter and Coveritlive. There was event an online barcamp which was held alongside the event barcamps which provided an opportunity for informal ad hoc presntations and discusisons to be arranged. Such event amplification, to use the term coined by Lorcan Dempsey and described in a Wikipedia article on Amplified conferences, exploits the potential of WiFi networks, which are widely available across many University campuses, and the popularity of mobile devices, such as smartphones, PDAs and other devices with WiFi capabilities. Amplified event also appear to be particularly appropriate at a time when institutions and individuals are concerned about the environmental impact associated with travel to events and when financial cuts in the public sector are resulting in difficulties in obtaining funding to travel to events. But can amplified events rally provide a useful and scaleable solution to such concerns? How should organisations address the risks of, effectively, outsourcing the event amplification infrastructure to Social Web services with whom there are no formal contractual agreements? Is it appropriate to make use of Social Web services, with their emphasis of the individual, to support institutional objectives? And what of the user who may feel that use of devices at an event is distracting and perhaps also rude? This seminar will explore these issues and provide advice for those wishing to host amplified events
    01/2010;
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    B. Kelly, M. Guy
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    ABSTRACT: Early adopters of blogs will have made use of externally-hosted blog platforms, such as Wordpress.com and Blogger.com, due, perhaps, to the lack of a blogging infrastructure within the institution or concerns regarding restrictive terms and conditions covering use of such services. There will be cases in which such blogs are now well-established and contain useful information not only for current readership but also as a resource which may be valuable for future generations. The need to preserve content which is held on such third-party services (“the Cloud’) provides a set of new challenges which are likely to be distinct from the management of content hosted within the institution, for which institutional policies should address issues such as ownership and scope of content. Such challenges include technical issues, such as the approaches used to gather the content and the formats to be used and policy issues related to ownership, scope and legal issues. This paper describes the approaches taken in UKOLN, an applied research department based at the University of Bath, to the preservation of blogs used in the organisation. The paper covers the technical approaches and policy issues associated with the curation of blogs a number of different types of blogs: blogs used by members of staff in the department; blogs used to support project activities and blogs used to support events.
    7th International Conference on Preservation of Digital Objects (iPRES 2010); 01/2010
  • B. Kelly
    Web 2.0 and Libraries: Impacts, Technologies and Trends, Edited by D. Parkes, E. Hart, 01/2010; , ISBN: 978-1843343479
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    ABSTRACT: The need for developing countries to consider appropriate strategies for enhancing access to networked resources by disabled people provides an opportunity to assess the merits and limitations of the approaches which have been taken in western countries. This paper reviews the limitations of dependence on a constrained technical definition of accessibility, and builds on previous work which developed a holistic approach to Web accessibility and a generic model to assist policy makers in understanding the complexities of addressing Web accessibility. We explore how such approaches can be deployed by practitioners and developers with responsibilities for the deployment of Web services within the context of limited resources, flawed technologies, conflicting priorities and debates within disability studies on the nature of disability. A pragmatic framework is presented which supports promotion of digital accessibility within a wider social inclusion context. It learns from past difficulties and aims to assist policy makers and practitioners across the world in decision-making when seeking to deploy accessible Web-based services within the context of limited resources, conflicting priorities and the limitations of technical accessibility guidelines.
    Proceedings of the International Cross-Disciplinary Conference on Web Accessibility, W4A 2010, Raleigh, NC, USA, April 26 - 27, 2010; 01/2010
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    B. Kelly
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    ABSTRACT: The importance of the Social Web is now being widely accepted for those working in organisations such as higher educational institutions and public libraries. It might now be argued that the advocacy work of the early adopters, who made use of Social Web platforms hosted in The Cloud, has been vindicated and that such pioneering work can be migrated to a secure and managed environment provided within the institution. This paper, however, argues that the examples provided by early adopters who have been successful in maintaining their Social Web services over a number of years and developing a community of readers and contributors demonstrates that effective services in-house services can be deployed outside the traditional institutional environment. The paper goes on to suggest that such approaches are particularly relevant at a time of cuts across the public sector. However it is acknowledged that there are legitimate concerns regarding the content and sustainability of such services. The paper concludes by proposing a policy framework which seeks to ensure that authors can exploit Cloud Services to engage with their audiences in a professional and authentic manner whilst addressing the concerns of their host institution.
    Online Information 2010; 01/2010
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    ABSTRACT: This article asserts that current approaches to enhance the accessibility of Web resources fail to provide a solid foundation for the development of a robust and future-proofed framework. In particular, they fail to take advantage of new technologies and technological practices. The article introduces a framework for Web adaptability, which encourages the development of Web-based services that can be resilient to the diversity of uses of such services, the target audience, available resources, technical innovations, organisational policies and relevant definitions of 'accessibility'. The article refers to a series of author-focussed approaches to accessibility through which the authors and others have struggled to find ways to promote accessibility for people with disabilities. These approaches depend upon the resource author's determination of the anticipated users' needs and their provision. Through approaches labelled as 1.0, 2.0 and 3.0, the authors have widened their focus to account for contexts and individual differences in target audiences. Now, the authors want to recognise the role of users in determining their engagement with resources (including services). To distinguish this new approach, the term 'adaptability' has been used to replace 'accessibility'; new definitions of accessibility have been adopted, and the authors have reviewed their previous work to clarify how it is relevant to the new approach. Accessibility 1.0 is here characterised as a technical approach in which authors are told how to construct resources for a broadly defined audience. This is known as universal design. Accessibility 2.0 was introduced to point to the need to account for the context in which resources would be used, to help overcome inadequacies identified in the purely technical approach. Accessibility 3.0 moved the focus on users from a homogenised universal definition to recognition of the idiosyncratic needs and preferences of individuals and to cater for them. All of these approaches placed responsibility within the authoring/publishing domain without recognising the role the user might want to play, or the roles that other users in social networks, or even Web services might play. Adaptability shifts the emphasis and calls for greater freedom for the users to facilitate individual accessibility in the open Web environment.
    Disability and rehabilitation. Assistive technology 08/2009; 4(4):212-26.

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