Aviv Shoham

Business Administration, Marketing
PhD
28.69

Publications

  • Sigal Segev, Aviv Shoham, Yossi Gavish
    Journal of Consumer Marketing 03/2015; 32(2):85-98. DOI:10.1108/JCM-07-2014-1082
  • International Marketing Review 02/2015; 32(1):52-77. DOI:10.1108/IMR-12-2014-0374 · 1.18 Impact Factor
  • Aviv Shoham, Vassilis Dalakas, Lia Lahav
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    ABSTRACT: Aggressive behaviors by sport spectators have become a major social problem in multiple sports and numerous countries. This study examines several team-related antecedents, as well as personality traits that may be related with physical and verbal aggressive fan behaviors. Interestingly, there appears to be relatively little crossover effects of personality trait verbal aggression on actual physical aggressive behaviors. Similarly, trait physical aggression effects also do not cross over and do not appear to affect verbal aggressive behaviors. These and additional drivers of aggressive fan behavior are discussed and their theoretical and practical implications are provided.
    Services Marketing Quarterly 01/2015; 36(1). DOI:10.1080/15332969.2015.976506
  • Itzhak Gnizy, Aviv Shoham
    Journal of Global Marketing 08/2014; 27(4):262-283. DOI:10.1080/08911762.2014.917755
  • Itzhak Gnizy, Aviv Shoham
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose ‐ The role played by the marketing function (MF) has been subjected to considerable academic and public media attention. Recent research reflects an ongoing debate on MF's decreasing influence attributed by some to its poor performance. However, studies have analyzed the general marketing (GM) function and domestic operations and remained silent on international marketing's (IM) influence and its impact on firms' international operations and performance as another aspect of marketing's influence. This lacuna is unfortunate, given that internationalization is crucial to many firms in today's globalizing world. The purpose of this paper is to examine the interactions between IM and GM functions as determinants of IM's influence. Design/methodology/approach ‐ The study extends previous models to the international context, utilizes an inclusive set of strategic international orientations as consequences and mediators of IM's influence, and assesses possible synergy between orientations. Findings ‐ IM functions are influential, valuable, and play an important role. IM-GM coordination enhances IMs' influence while IM-GM conflicts and IM's influence are unrelated. IMs' influence enhances performance directly and indirectly through orientations. Importantly, the combined orientations had a negative synergistic effect on performance. Research limitations/implications ‐ International marketers and top management should consider tactics to increase IMs' influence and thus benefit their firms. Originality/value ‐ The study is the first to recognize and empirically focus on the relationships between IM and GM as distinct functions. The study accounts for a combined impact of international orientations on international performance.
    International Marketing Review 02/2014; 31(1). DOI:10.1108/IMR-12-2012-0204 · 1.18 Impact Factor
  • Gavriel Dahan, Aviv Shoham
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    ABSTRACT: Strategic orientations have attracted scholars' attention across disciplines and the pros and cons of such orientations have been studied extensively. However, previous literature largely ignored possible interrelationships between these orientations. In sum, most studies have not examined potential synergetic effects of multiple orientations. Against this background, we develop an integrative model, which proposes relationships between antecedents and performance consequences of pioneering, entrepreneurial, and stakeholder orientations. (C) 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.
    Procedia - Social and Behavioral Sciences 01/2014; 109:758-762. DOI:10.1016/j.sbspro.2013.12.540
  • Amir Lahat, Aviv Shoham
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    ABSTRACT: Despite the popularity of research on benchmarking and on market-based learning, as well as their theoretical importance, several gaps exist in the literature. Most research has tended to focus on specific disciplinary silos in isolation. For example, several studies have examined these issues in the marketing discpline. Likewise, other studies have focused on manufacturing capabilities to the neglect of other facets of firms' operations. However, few have examined benchmarking and organizational learning in multiple discplines. The model developed in this paper furthers the understanding of firms' benchmarking of strategies in two discplines, namely marketing and operational (R&D and manufacturing) capabilities. These are modeled as drivers of international performance. (C) 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.
    Procedia - Social and Behavioral Sciences 01/2014; 109:998-1000. DOI:10.1016/j.sbspro.2013.12.578
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    ABSTRACT: Organizational innovativeness (OI) is a central concept in academic research and managerial practice. In many cases, OI has been operationalized as the number of innovations organizations adopt. In contrast, this paper conceptualizes OI as a five-dimensional construct (creativity, openness, future orientation, risk-taking, and proactiveness) representing the organizational climate, which refers to the organization's ability to generate ideas and innovate continually over time. The findings support the conceptualization and operationalization of the five-dimensional OI, validated in Norway, Israel, and Spain. These results shed new light on existing findings and can promote new research directions as well as guide strategic managerial decision-making.
    Journal of Product Innovation Management 12/2013; 31(5). DOI:10.1111/jpim.12141 · 1.38 Impact Factor
  • Kalanit Efrat, Aviv Shoham
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose ‐ Entry modes are a central aspect of international business, particularly for young firms lacking organizational experience and capital, such as born global (BG) firms. Few studies on BG internationalization have addressed the antecedents to entry mode decisions in BG firms. Based on the two main groups of factors impacting entry mode decisions in general, namely environmental (external) conditions and firms' strategic characteristics, the purpose of this paper is to explore how the interaction between country and market factors and BGs' strategic orientation affects BGs' choice of low- vs high-commitment entry modes. Design/methodology/approach ‐ Data from 104 Israeli high-tech BG firms were gathered in field interviews with managers. Preliminary analyses assessed non-response bias. Findings ‐ Most BGs showed a strong Prospector orientation manifested by exploration and exploitation of opportunities. This in turn moderated the impact of several host market factors on the choice of entry mode, encouraging BGs to choose high-commitment entry modes. Practical implications ‐ Contrary to earlier research claiming that BGs minimize risk by choosing low-commitment entry modes, the findings show that BGs' choice of commitment level is affected by host market characteristics. Originality/value ‐ It is often thought that BGs' choice of entry mode is decisively affected by the host market risk profile, encouraging the choice of low-commitment entry modes in riskier markets. As the findings show, however, BGs are also sensitive to the opportunities provided by the host market, sometimes resulting in high-commitment entry modes.
    International Marketing Review 10/2013; 30(6). DOI:10.1108/IMR-10-2012-0171 · 1.18 Impact Factor
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    Ruth Segev, Aviv Shoham, Ayalla Ruvio
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose ‐ Previous research on impression management explored motives, the use of impression management tactics and the influence of personality characteristics on the tendency to engage in impression management. The purposes of this research are to examine gift-giving behavior among adolescents based on the building blocks of impression management theory, the ways that personality characteristics motivate gift-givers to engage in active and defensive impression management and how the use of impression management tactics (i.e. similarity-conformity and target-enhancement) are reflected in their gift-giving behavior. Design/methodology/approach ‐ A convenience sample of 141 adolescences was used in a quantitative study. Self-report questionnaires were distributed to adolescents of different ages (13-16), with students from diverse social strata. Students were asked to recall a recent peer gift-giving experience and to refer to it when answering the questions which covered motives for gift-giving, personality characteristics, and the characteristics of the gift. Findings ‐ The authors' study shows that personality characteristics such as public self-consciousness, self-monitoring, and self-esteem are positively related with gift-giving motives. Additionally, gift-giving motives are positively related with the use of similarity-conformity and target-enhancement tactics. Finally, the use of impression management tactics reflects adolescents' special characteristics, such as their tendency towards conformism, important role of peers in their lives, and their high need to protect and nurture these social resources. Originality/value ‐ This research explored the instrumental role of gift-giving among adolescents and contributes to the existing literatures on gift-giving, impression management, and adolescents' consumer behavior.
    Journal of Consumer Marketing 07/2013; 30(5). DOI:10.1108/JCM-01-2013-0426
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    Kalanit Efrat, Aviv Shoham
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    ABSTRACT: Aggressive driving is a growing problem worldwide. Previous research has provided us with some insights into the characteristics of drivers prone to aggressiveness on the road and into the external conditions triggering such behavior. Little is known, however, about the personality traits of aggressive drivers. The present study proposes planned behavior and materialism as predictors of aggressive driving behavior. Data was gathered using a questionnaire-based survey of 220 individuals from twelve large industrial organizations in Israel. Our hypotheses were tested using structural equation modeling. Our results indicate that while planned behavior is a good predictor of the intention to behave aggressively, it has no impact on the tendency to behave aggressively. Materialism, however, was found to be a significant indicator of aggressive driving behavior. Our study is based on a self-reported survey, therefore might suffer from several issues concerning the willingness to answer truthfully. Furthermore, the sampling group might be seen as somewhat biased due to the relatively high income/education levels of the respondents. While both issues, aggressive driving and the theory of planned behavior, have been studied previously, the linkage between the two as well as the ability of materialism to predict aggressive behavior received little attention previously. The present study encompasses these constructs providing new insights into the linkage between them.
    Accident; analysis and prevention 07/2013; 59C:459-465. DOI:10.1016/j.aap.2013.06.023 · 1.65 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Relying on organizational innovativeness for long-term growth and profitability can be difficult, time consuming, and expensive. In the context of service delivery of 395 strategic business units (SBU) in Israel's healthcare industry, this paper examines the role of a learning-orientation as a moderator in an integrative model of organizational innovativeness. We find moderation of the impacts of risk-taking, creativity, competitor benchmarking orientation, and environmental opportunities on innovativeness. Moreover, we find the influence on performance pronounced for high learning-oriented SBUs. The paper shows that learning orientation should be considered for understanding effective innovativeness work for competitive service delivery.
    Journal of Engineering and Technology Management 04/2013; 30(2):169–187. DOI:10.1016/j.jengtecman.2013.01.004 · 2.11 Impact Factor
  • Aviv Shoham, Ossi Pesämaa
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    ABSTRACT: Following the seminal work of Bruner and Kumar (2007) on gadget loving, this paper views gadget loving as the attachment individuals have toward advanced electronic items and how such an attachment relates to actual use (i.e., actual gadgets ownership). It extends existing research in two important ways. First, it provides a retest of the reliability and validity of the gadget-loving scale in two new countries (Israel and Sweden), thus adding to the generalizability of the scale across cultures. Second, it develops and tests an integrative model that includes gadget loving as a central construct as well as several antecedents and consequences proposed as important topics for future research in the extant literature. The results show that inherent novelty seeking, technological innovativeness, and technical curiosity predict the gadget-loving trait, which in turn affects technological opinion leadership and gadget ownership. These findings have theoretical and practical implications.
    Psychology and Marketing 03/2013; 30(3). DOI:10.1002/mar.20602 · 1.13 Impact Factor
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    Ayalla Ruvio, Yossi Gavish, Aviv Shoham
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    ABSTRACT: This paper focuses on the consumer's doppelganger effect, the inclination of consumers to intentionally mimic other individuals' consumption behaviors. Taking a role model perspective, we look at the inclination of Israeli teenage girls to resonate with role models with whom they have unidirectional (study 1; N = 152) and bidirectional (study 2; N = 343) relationships. The findings demonstrate that consumers' doppelgangers have a strong inclination to intentionally emulate other individuals' consumption behavior when they perceive them as consumer role models, an assessment that is rooted in their view of these individuals as relevant. The contributions of this research relate to the study of mimicry, role modeling, and family consumption. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
    Journal of Consumer Behaviour 01/2013; 12(1). DOI:10.1002/cb.1415 · 0.75 Impact Factor
  • Ruthie Segev, Aviv Shoham, Ayalla Ruvio
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    ABSTRACT: This study examines adolescents’ gift giving using a qualitative methodology, based on impression management theory. Gift‐giving motives and the characteristics of the chosen gifts indicated that adolescents use gift giving instrumentally to manage and protect their impressions among their peers. The study extends the literature on adolescents’ gift giving, and provides evidence regarding different types of gifts such as joint, neutral, and twofold gifts. Additionally, some gifts are aimed at strengthening similarity and bind the extended selves of givers and receivers.
    Psychology and Marketing 10/2012; 29(10). DOI:10.1002/mar.20561 · 1.13 Impact Factor
  • Kalanit Efrat, Aviv Shoham
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    ABSTRACT: Globalization has triggered the emergence of a new breed of firms called “Born Globals” (BGs), firms that become international soon after inception. Unlike previous research, the present study distinguishes between BGs’ short- and long-term performance and argues that different drivers affect each type of performance. Data from 107 Israeli BGs shows that their short-term performance is impacted mostly by environmental (external) factors. In contrast, over the long run, internal factors become more crucial to BGs’ survival and success. These time-based differences have important theoretical and practical implications.
    Journal of World Business 10/2012; 47(4):675–685. DOI:10.1016/j.jwb.2012.01.015 · 2.62 Impact Factor
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    Aviv Shoham, Merav Saker, Yossi Gavish
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    ABSTRACT: This paper focuses on consumers' adoption of preventive health behaviors (PHB). It aims to explain PHB among Israeli consumers by examining their motives, needs, and actions. A model of PHB based on two approaches used previously (Moorman & Matulich, 1993; Jayanty & Burns, 1998) is developed and tested with data from Israeli consumers. Results suggest that PHB is influenced by health motivation and health knowledge and, to a lesser extent, by self-and response-efficacy. Self-and response-efficacy are impacted by self-motivation. The findings, in combination, can help policy-makers and marketing managers in designing effective marketing campaigns to encourage PHB.
    05/2012; 4(2). DOI:10.5539/ijps.v4n2p56
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    ABSTRACT: Most previous within-discipline research on innovativeness as an organizational trait does not account for cross-disciplinary perspectives, leading to incomplete findings. This paper develops an integrative model of organizational innovativeness, based on research in several disciplines to identify antecedents to, characteristics of, and outcomes of organizational innovativeness. Cross-sectional, questionnaire-based data from Israeli, Lithuanian, and Slovakian public organizations were used to test the model. Market and learning orientation enhanced organizational innovativeness, whereas internal politics and centralization reduced it. Organizational innovativeness enhanced two individual-level outcomes (satisfaction and commitment), as well as innovation performance, which, in turn, improved overall organizational performance.
    Journal of Engineering and Technology Management 04/2012; 29(2):226–240. DOI:10.1016/j.jengtecman.2012.01.002 · 2.11 Impact Factor
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    Aviv Shoham, Yossi Gavish, Sigal Segev
    02/2012; 4(1). DOI:10.5539/ijps.v4n1p76
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    Ayalla A Ruvio, Aviv Shoham
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    ABSTRACT: In this paper, the literature on aggressive driving tendencies as a con-sumption experience is reviewed. Two studies test a comprehensive model that includes personality, attitudinal, and value antecedents to such behavior. The research supports the role of most of the antecedents. However, personality and attitudinal constructs were found to be stronger predictors of aggressive driving than values. Furthermore, the paper demonstrates that aggressive driving ten-dencies increase incidences of law breaking. Suggestions for future research and practical implications are discussed. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Millions of people around the world own cars and use them on a daily basis, making driving one of the most common consumption behaviors (Martin, Schouten, & Stephens, 2006). As in other consumption behaviors, individuals' personalities, attitudes, and values affect their perceptions of the driving expe-rience. Some people view it as a pleasurable experience, others see it as a diver-sion, and for some driving is a "power trip." The meaning of the car also varies across individuals. While some regard the car as a functional tool for getting from one place to another, others view it as part of their identity (Belk, 2004; Lamont & Molnar, 2001). This paper examines how individuals' personalities, attitudes, and values affect their driving behavior, particularly their aggres-sive driving behavior.
    Psychology and Marketing 11/2011; 28(11). DOI:10.1002/mar.20429 · 1.13 Impact Factor

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