Publications

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    ABSTRACT: The talar neck is deviated medially with reference to the long axis of the body of the talus. In addition, it deviates plantarward. The talar neck fracture line is sometimes observed to be oriented obliquely (not perpendicular to the long axis of the talar neck). This occurs when the medially deviated talar neck strikes the horizontally oriented anterior lower tibial edge. Internal fixation of a simple displaced talar neck fracture usually requires 2 lag screws. Because the fracture line is obliquely oriented, a better method for positioning the screws perpendicular to the fracture line is to place them in a reversed direction to provide maximum interfragmentary compression at the fracture site, which could increase the likelihood of absolute stability with subsequent improvement in the incidence of fracture union and a reduction of complications, such as avascular necrosis of the body of the talus. Two lag screws are used, with the first inserted from posteriorly to anteriorly (perpendicular to the fracture line) using a medial approach after medial malleolar chevron osteotomy. The second screw is inserted from anteriorly to posteriorly (perpendicular to the fracture line) using an anterolateral approach. Both screw heads should be countersunk. A series of 8 patients underwent this form of internal fixation for talar neck fracture repair, with satisfactory functional outcomes. In conclusion, the use of antegrade-retrograde opposing lag screws is a reasonable method of internal fixation for simple displaced talar neck fractures. Copyright © 2015 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    The Journal of foot and ankle surgery: official publication of the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons 11/2014;
  • Ashraf Abdelkafy, Hatem Galal Said
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to prospectively evaluate outcomes of arthroscopic management of neglected ununited tibial eminence fractures in skeletally immature patients.
    International Orthopaedics 07/2014; · 2.32 Impact Factor
  • Ashraf Abdelkafy
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose was to evaluate the clinical results of arthroscopic meniscal repair of long vertical longitudinal tears using combined cruciate and horizontal suture techniques.
    European journal of orthopaedic surgery & traumatology : orthopedie traumatologie. 05/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to biomechanically evaluate suture-tendon interface and tissue holding of three sutures in torn and degenerated versus intact human rotator cuffs. Sixty-three human rotator cuff tendons were divided into torn degenerated group (TDG), n = 21 and intact group (IG), n = 42. Ultimate tension load (UTL) and cyclic loading were tested for three arthroscopic sutures: simple, horizontal, and massive cuff sutures (MCS). Ultimate tension load was significantly higher (p < 0.05) for the MCS (194 ± 68 N) in comparison with the simple (105 ± 48 N) and horizontal sutures (141 ± 49 N) in IG. In TDG, UTL was not significantly higher (n.s.) for MCS (118 ± 49 N), simple (79 ± 30 N), and horizontal sutures (107 ± 28 N) in comparison with IG. MCS (118 ± 49 N) showed no significantly superior UTL in comparison with the simple and horizontal sutures in the TDG. MCA elongation was 0.6 ± 0.7 mm in the IG and 1.3 ± 0.7 mm in the TDG, while horizontal suture elongation was 0.7 ± 0.4 mm in the IG and 1.3 ± 0.5 mm in the TDG. Simple suture elongation was 1.1 ± 0.5 mm in the IG and 1.6 ± 0.7 mm in the TDG. Human torn and degenerated rotator cuffs have poor tissue quality, significantly lower UTL and higher cyclic elongation in comparison with intact cuffs regardless of the type of suture used for repair, which invites the need for repair techniques that grasps greater tissue volume in addition to augmentation techniques. Clinicians better use repair techniques that grasp greater tissue volume (e.g. MCS, modified Mason-Allen cross bridge, double-row cross bridge, etc.) when repairing the torn and degenerated rotator cuffs.
    Knee Surgery Sports Traumatology Arthroscopy 04/2014; · 2.68 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Humeral resurfacing arthroplasty represents an alternative option to hemiarthroplasty for treatment of cuff tear arthropathy (CTA), with the advantages as follows: suitability for relatively young and high-demand patients because of preservation of bone stock and no loss of length, less invasive surgery, shorter operation time, no risk of periprosthetic stem fractures, and revision surgery can be undertaken easily. In the current study, resurfacing arthroplasty in combination with latissimus dorsi tendon transfer for CTA was performed. Three hypotheses: first, humeral resurfacing arthroplasty in combination with latissimus dorsi tendon transfer would improve the overall functional outcome in patients with CTA. Second, this combination would improve humeral external rotation. Third, this combination would improve abduction and shoulder elevation. Study was conducted as an observational case series. Fourteen patients (nine ♀ and five ♂) having CTA were included. Follow-up was carried out at the end of the 28th month for all patients. Constant Score was used for follow-up evaluation. Dorso-axillary approach was used for latissimus dorsi tendon transfer and ventral deltopectoral approach for Copeland resurfacing. Tendons were fixed to the greater tuberosity with two anchors. The absolute Constant Score significantly improved from 34 preoperatively to 69 postoperatively, relative Constant Score from 42 to 91 %, elevation from 95° to 138°, abduction from 88° to 147°, and external rotation from 16° to 22° (not significant). Humeral resurfacing arthroplasty in combination with latissimus dorsi tendon transfer in patients having CTA with preserved subscapularis function has satisfactory short-term functional clinical outcome. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: IV.
    European Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery & Traumatology 03/2014; · 0.18 Impact Factor
  • Ashraf Abdelkafy
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    ABSTRACT: Collagen fibres of the meniscus arrange into two main orientations: circumferential fibres parallel to the long axis of the meniscus and radial fibres perpendicular to the long axis of the meniscus. Meniscal sutures are placed either in vertical or in horizontal orientations. Vertical sutures better hold circumferential fibres because it encircles them like a rope holding a bunch of tree branches. In the same manner, horizontal sutures better hold radial fibres. The "Simplified Cruciate Suture" consists of two vertical oblique sutures. Placing two vertical sutures in an oblique orientation captures greater meniscal tissue volume, holds and grasps both circumferential and radial collagen fibres of the meniscus into a three-dimensional plane with eventual high fixation strength of the repaired meniscal tear. Simplified cruciate suture is indicated for the repair of long bucket handle tears where it is placed in the middle of the tear like an anchor, and additional vertical and horizontal sutures are placed anterior and posterior to it as needed. Level of evidence V.
    Knee Surgery Sports Traumatology Arthroscopy 02/2013; · 2.68 Impact Factor
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    Ashraf Abdelkafy
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    ABSTRACT: Accurate positioning of the femoral tunnel in the native femoral anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) footprint requires drilling through an accessory medial portal (AMP). The AMP is located far medial and at a low level. Despite the benefits of drilling through the AMP, it is possible that the drill bit head will injure the articular cartilage of the medial femoral condyle as it slides along the guide pin to the femoral insertion of the ACL. Because more surgeons are now performing anatomic ACL reconstructions and shifting from transtibial drilling toward transportal drilling, the risk of this injury might be increasing, especially during the beginning of their learning curve. To avoid such injury, a bio-interference screw sheath is used. It is inserted through the AMP over the guide pin until it reaches near the medial wall of the lateral femoral condyle. The drill bit is inserted over the guide pin and through the bio-interference screw sheath. Using the bio-interference screw sheath not only protects the articular cartilage of the medial femoral condyle but also protects the medial meniscus, posterior cruciate ligament, and skin of the AMP from injury because of the close proximity of the drill bit head to these structures during transportal drilling.
    Arthroscopy techniques. 12/2012; 1(2):e149-54.
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    ABSTRACT: Intra-articular shift (migration) of bone marrow edema syndrome (BMES) is a very rare disease. Only a few cases have been reported thus far. The condition may cause the clinician to suspect an aggressive disease. We reviewed eight patients (four women and four men) with unilateral BMES located in the knee. The patients were aged 39 to 56 years (mean, 49.2 years). In all patients, bone marrow edema (BME) initially observed on magnetic resonance imaging (MR imaging) shifted within the same joint, i.e. from the medial to the lateral femoral condyle or the adjacent bone. Seven patients were given conservative therapy, including limited weight-bearing, for a period of three weeks after the initial detection of BMES, whereas one patient underwent surgical core decompression twice. MR imaging showed complete restitution in 6 cases and a small residual edema in one case. A final control MR could not be obtained for one patient, who had no pain. A further patient had an avascular necrosis of the contralateral hip after 16 months. Improvement on MR imaging was correlated with the clinical outcome in all cases. All patients became asymptomatic after a mean period of 9 months (6-11). Intra-articular shifting BMES is a very rare condition. As the disease is self-limiting, conservative therapy may be recommended.
    BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders 02/2008; 9:45. · 1.88 Impact Factor
  • Ashraf Abdelkafy
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    ABSTRACT: Arthroscopic meniscal repair is the procedure of choice whenever a reparable tear is diagnosed. The cruciate suture for arthroscopic meniscal repair is a type of the outside-in technique. It has advantages like: (1) its ultimate tension load (UTL) is 1.6 times higher than the UTL of the vertical suture (gold standard), (2) it holds the circumferential collagen fibers of the meniscus in a three-dimensional plane compared to the vertical and horizontal sutures which hold the circumferential fibers of the meniscus in a two-dimensional plane, (3) simple instrumentation, (4) could withstand not only distraction forces on the repaired meniscal tear but also, shear forces because of the oblique orientation of the cruciate suture limbs. It has disadvantages like: being difficult to perform and time-consuming. A modified technique is presented in this study which has the following advantages; (1) less time-consuming, (2) performed through a smaller skin incision, (3) a sliding knot is used to tie the cruciate suture.
    Knee Surgery Sports Traumatology Arthroscopy 10/2007; 15(9):1116-20. · 2.68 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To perform a long-term follow-up evaluation of the outside-in technique of arthroscopic meniscal repair. Retrospective study. Between the years 1986 and 2002, 93 cases of arthroscopic meniscal repair using the outside-in technique have been operated by the senior author (F.L.). Forty-one patients were available for the follow-up evaluation with a mean follow-up of 11.71 years. The International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC), the modified Lysholm score, the SF-36 (short form 36) health survey score, a visual analogue scale (VAS) for assessment of patients' satisfaction and another VAS for assessment of patients' pain were used retrospectively to evaluate the patients. We also used the Kellgren and Lawrence (K/L) classification of osteoarthritis to evaluate the preoperative X-rays and the X-rays done at the time of the follow-up evaluation. Failure was defined as having a meniscectomy procedure post-operatively. Results: From the 93 patients, 52 could not be retrieved for the follow-up evaluation, while 41 were available for it; 36 patients were clinically successful and 5 were considered as failure. Thirty-six patients were classified as grade "A" in the objective IKDC score, mean modified Lysholm score was 87.29 (SD 16.43), while mean SF-36 score was 85.73 (SD 14.17). The results of the VAS for operation satisfaction ranging from -10 to +10 revealed that the mean of the answers was 8.05 (SD 2.99). The results of the VAS for pain ranging from 0 to 10 revealed that the mean of the patients' pain at the time of the follow-up evaluation was 1.8 (SD 2.42). Twenty out of 24 (only 24 preoperative X-rays were available) were classified as having no osteoarthritis pre-operatively, whereas only 12 out of the 41 patients were classified as having no osteoarthritis (normal) at the time of the follow-up evaluation according to the K/L classification which indicates progression of osteoarthritis. No complications related to the outside-in arthroscopic meniscal repair procedure were reported. We conclude that arthroscopic meniscal repair using the outside-in technique is a safe surgical procedure with a good clinical outcome.
    Archives of Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery 06/2007; 127(4):245-52. · 1.36 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Meniscal repair has become the treatment of choice whenever a reparable tear is diagnosed. Fixation strength of the repair technique is always of paramount importance in comparison of various techniques, especially after the evolution of many arthroscopic all-inside devices. We present a new arthroscopic meniscal repair suturing technique called "cruciate suture." One 18-gauge needle and suture material are used. The needle is loaded with the suture material from its tip. The suture is folded at the tip of the needle, which is inserted to penetrate the skin obliquely to appear inside the joint, making a loop. The needle is retracted, while the suture is kept inside of it. The needle is reinserted at the same hole, appearing inside the joint and making a second loop. The needle is retracted completely. With the use of a probe, the loop at the second point is pulled through the loop at the first point, thereby forming a free end. The 2 limbs of the loop are pulled, thus driving the limb with the free end outside of the joint. The first oblique vertical suture is completed at this point. The needle is reloaded by the suture limb from the first point. The previous procedure is repeated, with use of the second skin hole and the third and fourth points to make the second oblique vertical suture. The cruciate suture is now complete. We tested the ultimate tension load (UTL) of the cruciate suture in comparison with that of the vertical suture (the gold standard). A total of 36 tests (18 for the cruciate suture and 18 for the vertical suture) were performed on human menisci. The mean UTL of the cruciate suture was measured at 110 N; the mean UTL of the vertical suture was 67 N.
    Arthroscopy The Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery 11/2006; 22(10):1134.e1-5. · 3.10 Impact Factor

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