Question

How many chemicals present in a cup of coffee?

Answer is 1500 chemicals.

Coffee has become a universal and almost indispensable beverage in the modern diet. It is a very reliable friend, the kind of friend who plays an important role in the various activities we perform during the day.

The different groups of chemicals present in coffee are:

150 Aliphatic compounds
56 Carbonyl compounds
9 Sulfur containing compounds
20 Alicyclic compounds
10 Ketones
60 Aromatic benzenoid compounds
16 Phenols
300 Heterocyclic compounds
74 Furans
10 Hydrofurans
37 Pyrroles
9 Pyridines
2 Quinolines
70 Pyrazines
10 Quinoxalines
3 Indoles
23 Thiophens
3 Thiophenones
28 Thiazoles
28 Oxazole

Pros:
The major content of coffee i.e. caffeine increases intellectual activity when fatigued or bored.

Caffeine speeds up fat metabolism during exercise.

Prevents cirrhosis of the liver.

Decreases the risk of Parkinson’s disease.

Reduces the incidence of kidney stones.

A team at Health Canada, a government regulatory agency concluded that 400 mg of caffeine per day (or about three 8-oz cups of brewed coffee) is a safe dose for healthy adults to consume, and below this level, the average user should not experience any health problem, and only vague psychological effects.

The team also set a limit of 2.5 mg per kg body weight per day for children. For an average 10-year-old in the U.S., that’s about 75 mg of caffeine, or two 12-oz cans of Coca-Cola.

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2 / 0  ·  8 Answers  ·  5088 Views

All Answers (8)

  • Seda Topkaya · Ege University
    Are these natural ingredients of coffee? Or are the chemicals added when they are produced?
  • Raghavendra Gupta · Bangalore University
    Every grain of coffee involves a complex mixture of chlorogenic acids, fatty acids, tocopherols and triglycerides etc. and these grains undergo many chemical and physical process ranging from growth to the extraction process.

    There are around 850 volatile substances, to which the delightful aroma can be owed, while roughly 700 of these substances can be solubilized in water.
  • Steingrimur Stefansson · HeMemics Biotechnologies Inc
    Reminds me that I need another cup.
  • Gunnar Schwarz · Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin
    Chemicals in a cup of coffee? Nice summary, but you forgot to mention the most abundant chemical, the solvent - water!
    I know, it's just one more and "only" the solvent... but if the preparation (extraction of the coffee powder) was performed with another solvent, it is likely to find more/other substances in the cup - maybe an interesting field of research, but it would also be much more unhealthy to drink, and from the point of view of impact (list of chemicals you drink, when consuming coffee) not as representative.
  • Kapileshwar Choudhary · Central Forensic Science Laboratory
    Can you give the name of all150 alliphatic compounds and methods of identification and if not what is the source?
  • Raghavendra Gupta · Bangalore University
    Hi kapileshwar here i am giving some of the chemicals list

    2,3,5-trimethylphenol
    24-methylene-cycloartenol
    24-methylenephenol
    2-ethylphenol
    2-methoxy-4-ethylphenol
    3,4-dicaffeoyl-quinic-acid
    3,5-dicaffeoyl-quinic-acid
    4,5-dicaffeoyl-quinic-acid
    4-ethylphenol
    4-methoxy-4-vinylphenol
    5-avenasterol
    7-stigmasterol
    8210 murphy road
    acetaldehyde
    adenine
    allantoic-acid
    allantoin
    alpha-tocopherol
    arabinogalactose
    arabinose
    arachidic-acid
    asparagine
    aspartic-acid
    beta-carotene
    beta-tocopherol
    cafesterol
    cafestol
    caffeic-acid
    caffeine
    caffeol
    caffeoyl-3-quinic-acid
    caffetannic-acid
    cahweol
    calcium
    camoestanol
    campesterol
    caprinic-acid
    carbohydrates
    carnaubic-acid
    cellulose
    chlorogenic-acid
    cholestanol
    cholesterol
    choline 300
    citric-acid
    citrostadienol
    coffeasterol
    cyanidin
    cycloeucalenol
    cysteine
    daturic-acid
    dextrins
    dihydrolanasterol
    dihydrositosterol
    dimethyl-5-alpha-cholest-7-en-3-beta-ol
    eugenol
    fufuryl-alcohol
    fulton
    furfuraldehyde
    galactan
    galactomannan
    gamma-sitosterol
    gamma-tocopherol
    glucogalactomannan
    guaiacol
    guanosine
    hemicellulose
    homocellulose
    hydrogen-sulfide
    hypoxanthine
    iron
    isochlorogenic-acid
    isoeugenol
    lanosterol
    lignoceric-acid
    linoleic-acid
    linolenic-acid
    mannose
    m-cresol
    methionine
    methyl-1-5-alpha-stigmast-7-en-3-beta-ol
    myristic-acid
    niacin
    nitrogen
    n-nonacosane
    obtusifoliol
    o-cresol
    oleic-acid
    oxalic-acid
    o-xylenol
    palmitic-acid
    p-coumaric-acid
    p-cresol
    pectin
    pentosane
    pentosans
    phosphorus
    putrescine
    p-xylenol
    raffinose
    rhamnose
    riboflavin
    saccharose
    scopoletin
    sinapic-acid
    spermidine
    spermine
    squalene
    stachyose
    stearic-acid
    stigmasterol
    sugar
    tannic-acid
    tannin
    tetracosic-acid
    theobromine
    theophylline
    thiamin
    trigonelline
    xanthine
    xylan
  • Kapileshwar Choudhary · Central Forensic Science Laboratory
    But you have not provided method of identification and separation of these compounds.
  • Leandro Oliveira · Federal University of Minas Gerais
    Firstly, all the answers above have oversimplified the real situation. The question, fortunately, was not how many chemicals are in coffee (roasted I'm assuming) but in a cup of coffee and a "correct" answer for the posed question is dependent upon the method of preparation of the beverage. If the coffee is prepared by a filter method, the majority of the lipidic fraction and other compounds immiscible in water will be retained in the filter and hence will not be present in the cup. If an espresso machine is used, the cup will be richer in chemicals than that of the filter method. If you consider preparations like those commonly used in Turkey, Greece and other countries that are in the habit of not filtering the coffee, then the cup will be the richest possible, because the roasted particles will be part of the beverage. I call the attention to the fact that there is no theobromine in coffee, and, although a couple of really old papers have reported a small amount of theophylline in coffee, I myself have never found theophylline in Brazilian coffees, employing HPLC.

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