Journal of Professional Nursing (J PROF NURS )

Publisher: American Association of Colleges of Nursing, Elsevier

Description

The journal addresses the practice, research and policy roles of nurses with baccalaureate and graduate degrees, the educational and management concerns of the universities in which they are educated, and the settings in which they practice. Reports of original work, research, reviews, and policy papers focusing on professional nursing are published.

  • Impact factor
    0.68
    Show impact factor history
     
    Impact factor
  • 5-year impact
    1.01
  • Cited half-life
    7.70
  • Immediacy index
    0.17
  • Eigenfactor
    0.00
  • Article influence
    0.27
  • Website
    Journal of Professional Nursing website
  • Other titles
    Journal of professional nursing
  • ISSN
    8755-7223
  • OCLC
    11400859
  • Material type
    Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Journal / Magazine / Newspaper, Internet Resource

Publisher details

Elsevier

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Pre-print allowed on any website or open access repository
    • Voluntary deposit by author of authors post-print allowed on authors' personal website, arXiv.org or institutions open scholarly website including Institutional Repository, without embargo, where there is not a policy or mandate
    • Deposit due to Funding Body, Institutional and Governmental policy or mandate only allowed where separate agreement between repository and the publisher exists.
    • Permitted deposit due to Funding Body, Institutional and Governmental policy or mandate, may be required to comply with embargo periods of 12 months to 48 months .
    • Set statement to accompany deposit
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to journal home page or articles' DOI
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Articles in some journals can be made Open Access on payment of additional charge
    • NIH Authors articles will be submitted to PubMed Central after 12 months
    • Publisher last contacted on 18/10/2013
  • Classification
    ​ green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Diversity is a topic of increasing attention in higher education and the nursing workforce. Experts have called for a nursing workforce that mirrors the population it serves. Students in nursing programs in the United States do not reflect our country’s diverse population; therefore, much work is needed before that goal can be reached. Diversity cannot be successfully achieved in nursing education without inclusion and attention to quality. The Inclusive Excellence (IE) framework can be used by nurse educators to promote inclusion, diversity, and excellence. In this framework, excellence and diversity are linked in an intentional metric-driven process. Accelerated programs offer a possible venue to promote diversity and one accelerated program is examined, using a set of metrics and a dashboard approach commonly used in business settings. Several recommendations were made for future assessment, interventions, and monitoring. Nurse educators are called to examine and adopt a diversity dashboard in all nursing programs.
    Journal of Professional Nursing 09/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Suicide is a worldwide public health problem. Although preparing nursing students to care for suicidal persons has been a standard part of nursing education for many years, nurses consistently report they lack competencies in caring for this population of patients. The purpose of this phenomenological and hermeneutical study was to understand the experiences undergraduate nursing students had in regard to caring for suicidal persons. The aim of the study was to obtain insights into the basic preparation of students in the care of suicidal persons to inform pedagogical approaches pertaining to suicide and improve the nursing care for these individuals. Twelve senior nursing students were recruited for the study. Data were collected using in-depth, unstructured interviews. The study themes indicated that: a) when participants’ read about suicidal persons’ mental status and behavior in patient records they initially feared interacting with and caring for these individuals; b) participants’ abilities to gather information about suicide risk was influenced by how much patients talked with them about their suicidal tendencies; and c) participants’ capacity to provide safe and therapeutic suicide prevention interventions was impacted by judicious critical thinking skills. Teaching strategies that align with the themes are provided.
    Journal of Professional Nursing 09/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Background The Partnerships for Progression: Inspiration for Aspirations project was developed to create a culture of academic progression for nurses in Virginia. Method A survey was completed by 128 nurses who are currently enrolled in RN-BSN programs throughout Virginia to learn why registered nurses pursue the BSN degree and to identify supports and obstacles that influence their experiences. Results / Findings Findings indicate that BSN progression is influenced by an interacting set of personal, work, and educational factors. Family support was cited as the most important facilitator for returning to school, yet time demands of balancing family, work, and school were seen as major obstacles to continuation. Internal motivation may differentiate nurses who return to school from those who do not. Conclusions Determining ways to inspire nurses while implementing practical steps for enabling nurses to pursue a BSN and succeed once they enroll is the challenge for nursing service and educational organizations.
    Journal of Professional Nursing 09/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Nurse leaders call for a more diverse nursing workforce, but too few address the concept of inclusion as a recruitment and retention strategy or as part of improving the academic learning milieu. This paper addresses organizational considerations of diversity and inclusion as part of the agenda established by the Association of American Colleges and Universities (AAC & U) for inclusive excellence, building on the idea that academic environments only become excellent when an inclusive climate is reached. Six organizational strategies to inclusion are presented from the authors’ experiences, some structural and others behavioral: admissions processes, invisibility, absence of community, promotion and tenure, exclusion, and tokenism. A call for structural and behavioral adaptions within nursing education to advance an inclusive excellence agenda is presented.
    Journal of Professional Nursing 09/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In an effort to meet the demand for well-educated, high-quality nurses, schools of nursing seek to admit those candidates most likely to have both timely progression and first-time success on the NCLEX-RN exam. Finding the right combination of academic indicators, which are most predictive of success, continues to be an ongoing challenge for entry-level baccalaureate nursing programs across the United States. Using a retrospective descriptive design, this pilot study explored the relationship of a standardized admission examination, the HESI Admission Assessment (A2 Exam) to preadmission GPA, science GPA, and nursing GPA. Additionally, the predictive ability of the A2 Exam, preadmission GPA, and science GPA related to timely progression and NCLEX-RN success were explored. In a sample of 89 students, no relationship was found between the A2 Exam and preadmission GPA or science GPA. The A2 Exam was correlated with nursing GPA and NCLEX-RN success, but not with timely progression. Further studies are needed to explore the utility and predictive ability of standardized exams such as the A2 Exam, and the contribution of such exams to evidence-based admission decision-making.
    Journal of Professional Nursing 09/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Retail health clinics are an expanding health care delivery model and an emerging new practice site for Nurse Practitioners (NP). Critical thinking skills, clinical competence, inter-professional collaboration and business savvy are necessary for successful practice in this highly independent and autonomous setting. This article describes a pilot residency partnership program aimed at supporting new graduate NP transition to practice, reducing NP turnover and promoting academic progression. Eight new graduate NPs were recruited to the pilot and paired with experienced clinical NP preceptors for a 12-month program that focused on increasing clinical and business competence in the retail health setting. The residency program utilized technology to facilitate case conferences and targeted webinars to enhance learning and peer-to-peer sharing and support. An on-line doctoral level academic course that focused on inter-professional collaboration in healthcare, population health and business concepts was offered. Both NPs and preceptors were highly satisfied with the academic-service residency program between MinuteClinic and Northeastern University School of Nursing in Boston, MA. New NPs particularly valued the preceptor model, the clinical case conferences and business webinars. Since their priority was in gaining clinical experience and learning the business acumen relevant to managing the processes of care, they did not feel ready for the doctoral course and would have preferred to take later in their practice. The preceptors valued the academic course and felt it enhanced their precepting and leadership skills. At the time of this article, 6 months post completion of the residency program; there has been no turnover. Our experience supports the benefits for residency programs for newly graduated NPs in retail settings. The model of partnering with academia by offering a course within a service organization’s educational programs can enable academic progression.
    Journal of Professional Nursing 09/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Self-evaluation is required for institutions of higher learning and the nursing programs within them. The literature provides information on evaluation models and instruments, and descriptions of how specific nursing education programs are evaluated. However, there are few discussions in the nursing education literature of the practical aspects of nursing education program evaluation: how to get started, how to keep track of data, who to involve in data collection, and how to manage challenging criteria. This article discusses the importance of program evaluation in the academic setting and provides information on practical ways to organize the evaluation process and aggregate data, and strategies for gathering data from students, graduates, alumni, and employers of graduates.
    Journal of Professional Nursing 09/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Professional identity formation is a dynamic process that begins in undergraduate nursing education and continues to develop throughout one’s professional career. In recent decades, nursing educators emphasized the social dimension of professional identity formation in which professionalization is achieved through following rules, codes, and standards set by the profession. Character or psychological development and the proper use of virtues like integrity, compassion or courage, are often part of the hidden curriculum. The purpose of this paper is to introduce a recently developed conception of professionalism that is grounded in virtue ethics and integrates both social and character development into a professional identity that is dynamic, situated, and lifelong. The conception is operationalized through the Framework for Nurse Professionals (FrNP) and the Stair-Step Model of Professional Transformation. The FrNP and the Stair-Step Model promote a robust and morally resilient professional nursing identity that will foster professional growth throughout one’s career.
    Journal of Professional Nursing 09/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: This study reports findings assessing the influence of the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Nursing Academy (VANA) academic-practice partnership program on nurse decision making regarding educational mobility and teaching aspirations. We conducted national surveys with nursing faculty from VANA partnership sites in 2011 (N=133) and 2012 (N=74). Faculty who spent more hours per week in the VANA role and who reported an increase in satisfaction with their participation in VANA were more likely to have been influenced by their VANA experience in choosing to pursue a higher degree (p<0.05). Sixty-nine percent of VANA faculty reported that they would be very interested in staying on as a VANA faculty member if the program should continue. Six measures were positively associated with VANA’s influence on the desire to continue as faculty beyond the VANA pilot; support from VANA colleagues, quality of VANA students, amount of guidance with curriculum development, availability of administrative support, support for improving teaching methods, and overall satisfaction with VANA experience (p<0.05). As the popularity of academic-practice partnerships grows and their list of benefits is further enumerated, motivating nurses to pursue both higher degrees and faculty roles should be listed among them based on results reported here.
    Journal of Professional Nursing 09/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This paper presents a case study of the adoption, use, and outcomes of an admission interview process for selection into a large public baccalaureate nursing program between 2007 and 2011. This paper reports the effects of implementation, including how interviews affected the grade point average of incoming students as well as student diversity, retention, and NCLEX scores, over nine consecutive admission cycles. During the initial implementation cycles, reported satisfaction with the process was high; however, as implementation progressed it became clear that the anticipated gains from the interview process related to ethnic and gender diversity were not being realized. Furthermore, implementation of the interview strategy created unforeseen difficulties. These two factors led to a decision to stop using this strategy for admission into the baccalaureate program. Lessons learned in the implementation of interviews as an admission criterion are included in the discussion.
    Journal of Professional Nursing 09/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Scholarship of teaching is inquiry about learning and teaching—asking questions about what works best and why, and seeking answers through a systematic approach. This article provides a broad view of the scholarship of teaching in nursing, which captures the richness and breadth of our scholarship as nurse educators. The article suggests strategies for transforming teaching into scholarship and products of the scholarship of teaching for performance assessment.
    Journal of Professional Nursing 09/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Million Hearts® is a national initiative to prevent one million heart attacks and strokes by 2017 by screening and educating the public on the “ABCS” of cardiovascular health. Million Hearts® is an innovative platform for educating nursing and health sciences’ students on the importance of population health and interprofessional teamwork. The National Interprofessional Education and Practice Consortium to Advance Million Hearts® was created and a free online educational module was developed to help healthcare professionals and health sciences’ faculty and students learn about the Million Hearts® initiative, conduct community screenings, and refer people who screen positive to appropriate resources. Following completion of the module, individuals receive certification as a Million Hearts® Fellow. Over 2,500 individuals from 80 colleges across the U.S. have accessed the module. Over 20,000 people have been screened. The module and screenings have been incorporated into health sciences’ curricula and community activities. Academic institutions and health science professions partnering together as part of the National Interprofessional Education and Practice Consortium to Advance Million Hearts® provides a unique opportunity to demonstrate the impact that a unified approach can have on improving population health through the use of screening, education, and prevention.
    Journal of Professional Nursing 08/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: The Clinical Immersion Model is an innovative baccalaureate nursing curriculum that has demonstrated successful outcomes over the past 10 years. For those intending to adopt the model, individual components in isolation may prove ineffective. This article describes three core components of the curriculum that form the foundation of preparation for the senior year clinical immersion. Detailed student-centered outcomes evaluation of these critical components is shared. Results of a mixed methods evaluation, including surveys and focus groups, are presented. Implications of this curricular evaluation and future directions are explored.
    Journal of Professional Nursing 08/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Faculty members are viewed as nurturers within the academic setting and may be able to influence students’ behaviors through the formation of positive interpersonal relationships. Faculty members’ attributes that best facilitated positive interpersonal relationships according to Carl Rogers’ Person-Centered Model was studied. Students (n = 192) enrolled in a 3-year undergraduate nursing program in urban Jamaica were randomly selected to participate in this descriptive cross-sectional study. A 38-item questionnaire on interpersonal relationships with nursing faculty and students’ perceptions of their teachers was utilized to collect data. Factor analysis was used to create factors of realness, prizing and empathetic understanding. Multiple linear regression analysis on the interaction of the three factors and interpersonal relationship scores was performed while controlling for nursing students’ study year and age. A total of 165 students (mean age 23.18 ± 4.51 years; 99% female) responded. The regression model explained over 46% of the variance. Realness (β = 0.50, p < 0.001) was the only significant predictor of the interpersonal relationship scores assigned by the nursing students. Of the total number of respondents, 99 students (60%) reported satisfaction with the interpersonal relationships shared with faculty. Nursing students’ perception of faculty members’ realness appeared to be the most significant attribute in fostering positive interpersonal relationships.
    Journal of Professional Nursing 08/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In response to the need for increased racial and ethnic diversity in the nursing profession, the Duke University School of Nursing (DUSON) established the Making a Difference in Nursing II (MADIN II) Program. The aim of the MADIN II Program is to improve the diversity of the nursing workforce by expanding nursing education opportunities for economically disadvantaged under-represented minority (URM) students to prepare for, enroll in, and graduate from the DUSON’s Accelerated Bachelors of Science in Nursing (ABSN) program. Adapted from the highly successful Meyerhoff Scholarship Program model, the program is to cultivate URM nursing graduates with advanced knowledge and leadership skills who can address health disparities and positively influence health care issues currently plaguing under-represented populations. The paper discusses the MADIN II framework consisting of four unique components: recruitment of students, the Summer Socialization Nursing Pre-entry Program (SSNPP), the Continued Connectivity Program, and the Succeed to Excellence Program, providing a framework for other academic programs interested in cultivating a pipeline of minority nurse leaders.
    Journal of Professional Nursing 08/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: The confidence and engagement of nurses (and midwives) in research is an area for continued development. The Research Appreciation, Accessibility, and Application Model (RAAAM) developed in 2011 provides a framework for enhancing research activities by nurses within the clinical setting. Unlike other models, the RAAAM does not assume a pre-existing capacity or knowledge of research; however the model incorporates the multiple research activities that comprise a research culture. While it is acknowledged that undertaking a research project is not for everyone, using evidenced based knowledge for practice development is essential and relates to all clinical staff. The RAAAM model presents four domains – Research Appreciation, Research Accessibility, Research Application and Research Sustainability. Research appreciation is a first step in realising the potential beneficial impact of research in practice. Relating these activities to identified key result areas that are drawn from keystakeholders completes the loop ensuring sustainability of research activities and processes. The model presented here offers a practical and user friendly approach for research enhancement in nursing using the platform of a clinical and academic partnership.
    Journal of Professional Nursing 08/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Health care professionals are challenged by the complexities of the health care environment. This study uses a qualitative approach to explore how teaching strategy affects the development of critical thinking (CT) among Taiwanese baccalaureate-level nursing students. Data collected from 109 students' reflection reports were analyzed using content analysis. Three categories generated by the analysis were the teaching–learning strategy, enhancing CT, and transiting into a different learning style. The teaching–learning strategy consisted of concept mapping, question and answer, and real-life case studies. CT was enhanced alternately by self-directed learning, the realization of the gap between known and unknown, and connecting the gap between theoretical nursing knowledge and clinical practice. The study results emphasize participants' perceptions of becoming a critical thinker, turning into an active learner, and eventually achieving self-confidence. These learning effects invest the wisdom of teaching–learning with a far-reaching significance.
    Journal of Professional Nursing 07/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Studies have shown that an under-appreciation of the importance of person-centered communication and inappropriate communication training could result in unsatisfactory communication performance from nurses. There are a large number of studies about communication training for nurses, but not so many about communication training in early stages of nursing career. The purpose of this study is to compare the effect of a traditional course versus scenario-based simulation training on nurses’ communication competency, communication self-efficacy, and communication performance in discharge planning OSCE. A randomized controlled trial was used with a pretest and two posttests. The experimental group underwent the scenario-based simulation course, while the control group received the traditional course. A convenience sample of 116 nurses with qualifications ranging from N0 level (novice nurses) to N2 level (competent nurses) in Taiwan’s clinical nursing ladder system was recruited from a medical center in northern Taiwan. Analysis of covariance was used to determine between-subjects effects on communication competency and self-efficacy, while independent t test and Mann-Whitney U test were used to examine between-subjects effects on learner satisfaction and discharge planning communication performance. Paired t test was used to determine communication self-efficacy. In this study, the nurses and independent raters found scenario-based simulation training more effective than traditional communication course. However, standardized patients reported no significant difference in communication performance between the two groups of nurses. Despite that traditional classroom lectures and simulation-based communication training could both produce enhanced communication competency and self-efficacy among nurses, this study has established that the latter may be better than the former in terms of learner satisfaction and communication performance improvement. Therefore, introduction of simulation-based training to in-service nursing education could enhance nurses’ communication performance in clinical practice.
    Journal of Professional Nursing 06/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Developing faculty ownership of ongoing curricular improvement presents educational and management challenges for schools of nursing, yet little has been published about which components help build a faculty community that values curricular assessment and improvement. The purpose of this case study was to describe key features of and faculty satisfaction with one school of nursing’s DNP curricular assessment process, with a description of key considerations for developing an ePortfolio-supported curricular assessment process. ePortfolio matrices were used as a curricular organizing structure for mapping and scoring each completed student assignment to an AACN Essential descriptor using a rubric that measured evidence of student learning. Faculty satisfaction with the process was also evaluated. First-year results indicated high levels of faculty satisfaction with the assessment process. The initial findings led to four actions for curricular improvement and agreement to continue the assessment process biannually. The curricular assessment was successful in generating faculty satisfaction, identifying needed areas to improve the curriculum, and obtaining faculty agreement to continue the process. A faculty community supportive of curricular assessment is essential to a transformational learning environment that prepares future nursing leaders.
    Journal of Professional Nursing 06/2014;