Cardiovascular Psychiatry and Neurology

Publisher: Hindawi Publishing Corporation

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  • ISSN
    2090-0171

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Hindawi Publishing Corporation

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Publications in this journal

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    ABSTRACT: Objective. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT) levels, cerebrovascular risk factors, and distribution of cerebral infarct areas in patients with acute ischemic stroke (AIS). Patients and Methods. Sixty patients with AIS and 44 controls who had not cerebrovascular disease were included in the study. The patients were divided into four groups according to the location of the infarct area and evaluated as for GGT levels and the presence of diabetes mellitus (DM), hypertension (HT), and hyperlipidemia (HL). Results. The frequency of DM, HT, and HL and gender distributions were similar. The mean GGT levels were significantly higher in patients with AIS and those with relatively larger areas of infarction (P < 0.05). Increased mean GGT levels were found in the subgroup with hypertension, higher LDL-cholesterol, and triglyceride levels among cases with AIS (P < 0.05). Conclusion. Higher GGT levels in AIS patients reinforce the relationship of GGT with inflammation and oxidative stress. The observation of higher GGT levels in patients with relatively larger areas of infarction is indicative of a positive correlation between increases in infarct areas and elevated GGT levels.
    Cardiovascular Psychiatry and Neurology 01/2014; 2014:170626.
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    ABSTRACT: Introduction. Psychiatric problems and stresses may deteriorate the prognosis of patients with IHD. So evaluating their frequency possibly will promote our perspective regarding their vital importance in the field of consultation-liaison psychiatry. Method and Materials. One hundred and one (101) patients with IHD were interviewed in CCU of a general hospital by a psychiatrist to find whether there was any relationship between cardiac events and psychiatric problems or stresses. Results. Cardiac events were significantly more prevalent among patients with both psychiatric problems and biological risk factors (P < 0.05). Also, the number of patients suffering from psychiatric problems was significantly more than cases without that (P < 0.05). There was a significant difference between male and female patients regarding the type of stress (P < 0.01). 79% of total stresses were experienced by patients who had as well psychiatric problems (P < 0.0001). In addition, there was significantly more dysthymic disorder in the acute group of patients in comparison with major or minor depressive disorder in the chronic group (P < 0.001). Conclusion. The high prevalence of psychiatric problems and psychosocial stresses among patients with IHD deserves sufficient attention by clinicians for detection, monitoring, and management of them.
    Cardiovascular Psychiatry and Neurology 01/2014; 2014:407808.
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    ABSTRACT: Introduction. Among atypical antipsychotics, none has been linked to torsade de pointes. In the present study, the electrocardiographic changes induced by olanzapine have been compared with risperidone. Method and Materials. 268 patients were entered into an open study for random assignment to olanzapine or risperidone. ECG was taken at baseline and at the end of the treatment. The parameters that had been assessed included Q-T interval (corrected = Q-Tc) and other related parameters. Correction of the observed Q-T interval was done according to Frederica's formula (QTcF). Results. While 14.86% and 25% of the cases in the olanzapine group showed prolongation and shortening of QTcF, respectively, comparable changes in the risperidone group were restricted to its prolongation (32.5%). Comparison of means between baseline QTcF of risperidone group versus its posttreatment measurement showed a significant increment (P = 0.02). Also, the quantity of cases with shortening of QTcF in the olanzapine group was significantly more than its opposite (P = 0.02). Conclusion. Comparable propensity of olanzapine and risperidone for induction of electrocardiographic changes demands adequate cautiousness by clinicians, particularly with respect to shortening of Q-T interval, which was mainly noticeable in the olanzapine group.
    Cardiovascular Psychiatry and Neurology 01/2014; 2014:637016.
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    ABSTRACT: Background. The effects of clinical depression after orthotopic heart transplantation (OHT) are relatively unknown. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of depression on outcomes after OHT. Methods. We performed a single center retrospective review of 102 consecutive patients who underwent OHT at Northwestern Memorial Hospital from June 2005 to October 2009. The diagnosis of depression was obtained from attending physician documentation. The primary endpoints were all-cause mortality (ACM), hospitalizations, and rejection. Results. Of 102 OHT patients, 26 (26%) had depression. Depressed patients were similar in age to nondepressed patients (57.6 years versus 56.9, P = 0.79). There was no statistical difference in survival between groups at 5 years after OHT (P = 0.94). All-cause hospitalizations were higher in depressed versus nondepressed patients (4.3 versus 2.6 hospitalizations P = 0.05). There were no significant differences in hospitalizations between the two groups for the following complications: cardiac (heart failure, edema, arrhythmias, and acute rejection) and infections. There was no significant difference in episodes of 2R and 3R rejection. Conclusion. Early identification and treatment of depression in OHT patients result in outcomes similar to nondepressed patients.
    Cardiovascular Psychiatry and Neurology 01/2014; 2014:747293.
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    ABSTRACT: Many case reports have been published of reversible left ventricular dysfunction precipitated by sudden emotional stress. We have evaluated 10 women hospitalized for acute chest pain and dyspnea, mimicking an acute coronary syndrome, after a severe emotional trigger. Those patients, postmenopausal women, presented ST segment alterations on the EKG, minor elevations of cardiac enzymes, and biomarkers levels. At the coronarography there was not coronary thrombosis or severe stenosis, but the ventriculography showed wall motion abnormalities involving the left ventricular apex and midventricle, in the absence of significant obstructive coronary disease. The course was benign without complication, with a full recovery of left ventricular function in some weeks. These observations, like other reports, demonstrate the impact of emotional stress on left ventricular function and the risk of cardiovascular disease. The cause of this cardiomyopathy is still unknown, and several mechanisms have been proposed: catecholamine myocardial damage, microvascular spasm, or neural mediated myocardial stunning.
    Cardiovascular Psychiatry and Neurology 01/2012; 2012:637672.