Food & Function Journal Impact Factor & Information

Publisher: Royal Society of Chemistry

Journal description

Current impact factor: 2.91

Impact Factor Rankings

2015 Impact Factor Available summer 2015
2013 / 2014 Impact Factor 2.907
2012 Impact Factor 2.694
2011 Impact Factor 1.179

Impact factor over time

Impact factor
Year

Additional details

5-year impact 2.70
Cited half-life 1.60
Immediacy index 0.55
Eigenfactor 0.00
Article influence 0.60
ISSN 2042-6496

Publisher details

Royal Society of Chemistry

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Pre-prints on non-commercial repositories and arXiv
    • Post-print on author's personal website
    • Author's post-print on institutional repository after 12 months from acceptance
    • Publisher's version/PDF may be used on author's personal website only
    • Publisher PDF will be supplied and may be used on author's personal website only
    • RSC will deposit the authors post-print, if appropriate in non-commercial repositories, not limited to funder's repositories after 12 months
    • Restrictions on further re-use and further distribution to be noted
  • Classification
    ​ green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: By interacting with nutrients, the mucus layer covering the intestinal epithelium may 3 mediate absorption. This study aimed to determine possible interactions between 4 epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), skim milk proteins or their complexes with human 5 intestinal mucin films. The films were extracted from postconfluent monolayers of HT29- 6 MTX, a human intestinal cell line, and a model system was created using drop shape 7 tensiometry. The EGCG uptake tested in vitro on postconfluent Caco-2 cells or co-cultures 8 of Caco-2/HT29-MTX (mucus producing) showed recovery of bioavailable EGCG only for 9 Caco-2 cell monolayers, suggesting an effect of mucus on absorption. Interfacial dilational 10 rheology was employed to characterize the properties of the interface mixed with mucus 11 dispersion. Adsorption of polyphenols greatly enhanced the viscoelastic modulus of the 12 mucus film, showing the presence of interactions between the nutrient molecules and mucus 13 films. On the other hand, in situ digestion of milk proteins using trypsin showed higher 14 surface activities as a result of protein unfolding and competitive adsorption of the 15 hydrolyzed products. There was an increase of viscoelastic modulus over drop ageing time 16 for the mixed interfaces, indicating the formation of a stiffer interfacial network. These 17 results bring new insights on the role of the mucus layer on nutrients absorption and the 18 interactions of mucus and dairy products.
    Food & Function 08/2015; Food Funct., 2015, DOI: 10.1039/C5FO00654F.
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    ABSTRACT: We study the short-term antihypertensive effect of the flavan-3-ols (-)-epicatechin, (+)-catechin and (-)-catechin, in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Plasma metabolites and the corresponding plasma antioxidant capacity were determined. All the assayed flavan-3-ols decreased systolic blood pressure (SBP) in SHR. Their antihypertensive effects were less pronounced than that of Captopril (50 mg/kg) and were not shown in normotensive Wistar-Kyoto rats. 6 mg/kg (-)-epicatechin caused the maximum decrease in SBP. The maximum effects of the catechin monomers were observed post-administration of 0.5 mg/kg of that flavan-3-ols, being (-)-catechin the least effective among the three assayed compounds. Glucuronide and methyl glucuronide metabolites were obtained in the flavan-3-ol treated SHR, but it was not possible to relate the antihypertensive effect of the assayed flavan-3-ols with a concrete plasma metabolite or with their antioxidant effect. In conclusion, the studied flavan-3-ols could be responsible for the antihypertensive effect of cocoa products.
    Food & Function 08/2015; DOI:10.1039/C5FO00547G
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    ABSTRACT: Limonin has been found to possess significant anti-inflammatory properties in animal tests and with, human cells, however, its precise metabolism mechanism has not been well explored. The aim of this study was to investigate the anti-inflammatory effects of limonin in a nonbacterial prostatitis (NBP) animal model. Global metabolite profiling was performed by ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography combined with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC/ESI-TOFMS) and in conjunction with multivariate data analysis and pathway analysis which were integrated to explore differentiating metabolites and clarify mechanism of limonin against capsaicin-induced NBP. Limonin has a potential protective function revealed by metabolic profiling of limonin-treated rats located closer to the normal group. Twenty potential biomarker candidates and several key metabolic pathways contributing to the treatment of NBP were discovered and identified. Among the pathways, the related glycine, serine and threonine metabolism, glycerophospholipid metabolism were acutely perturbed. The changes in metabolites were restored to their base-line levels after limonin treatment, which might be through regulating the perturbed pathways to the normal state. The results indicate that changed biomarkers and pathways may provide evidence to insight into limonin action mechanisms and enable us to increase research productivity toward metabolomics in therapeutical assessment and drug discovery.
    Food & Function 08/2015; DOI:10.1039/C5FO00489F
  • Food & Function 08/2015;
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    ABSTRACT: Seaweeds are an underutilised nutritional resource that could not only compliment the current western diet but potentially bring additional health benefits over and above their nutritional value. There are four groups of seaweed algae; green algae (Chlorophyceae), red algae (Rhodophycae), blue-green algae (Cyanophyceae) and brown algae (Phyophyceae). Seaweeds are rich in bioactive components including polysaccharides and polyphenols. Polysaccharides content, such as fucoidan, laminarin, as well as alginate is generally high in brown seaweeds which are also a source of polyphenols such as phenolic acids, flavonoids, phlorotannin, stilbenes and lignans. These components have been shown to reduce the activity of digestive enzymes, modulating enzymes such as α-amylase, α-glucosidase, pepsin and lipase. This review discusses the effect of several of these components on the digestive processes within the gastrointestinal tract; focusing on the effect of alginate on pancreatic lipase activity and its potential health benefits. Concluding that there is evidence to suggest alginate has the potential to be used as an obesity treatment, however, further in vivo research is required and an effective delivery method for alginate must be designed.
    Food & Function 07/2015; DOI:10.1039/C5FO00293A
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    ABSTRACT: This study was made to investigate the components of a new resource food in China, peony seed oil (PSO) by GC-MS (Gas chromatography–mass spectrometry), the inhibitory effects of peony seed oil on carbohydrate hydrolyzing enzymes in vitro and the anti-diabetic effects of peony seed oil on mice induced by streptozotocin(STZ). Results showed that peony seed oil showed weak anti-α-amylase activity; however, strong anti-α-glucosidase activity was noted. The GC-MS analysis of the oil showed 9 constituents of which α-linolenic was found the major component (38.66%), followed by linoleic acid (26.34%) and oleic acid (23.65%). The anti-diabetic potential of peony seed oil was tested in STZ induced diabetic mice. Administration of peony seed oil and glibenclamide reduced the blood glucose level and the area under curve (AUC) in STZ induced diabetic mice. There were significant increase in body weight, liver glycogen content, serum insulin level, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and decrease in glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1C), total serum cholesterol (TC), and triglyceride (TG) in test groups as compared to untreated diabetic groups. In vivo antioxidant studies on STZ induced diabetic mice revealed the reduction of malondialdehyde (MDA) and increase of glutathione peroxides (GSH-px), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione (GSH). The results provided a sound rationale for future clinical trials of oral administration of peony seed oil to alleviate postprandial hyperglycemia in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice. Key words: peony seed oil; α-linolenic; antidiabetic; α-glucosidase; α-amylase
    Food & Function 07/2015; DOI:10.1039/C5FO00507H
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    ABSTRACT: The digestibility and estimated glycemic indices (GI) of native (NWS), cross-linked (CLWS) and hydroxypropylated wheat starches (HPWS) were obtained by in vitro enzymatic hydrolysis. The resistant starch (RS) content and GI were found to be 6.59 and 93.13 for NWS, 7.57 and 92.20 for CLWS, and also 13.15 and 89.04 for HPWS, respectively. The amounts of glucose release for CLWS were approximately 6-11%, and for HPWS were 16-19% lower than that for NWS after digestion at simulated intestinal condition (SIC). The linear and two-term exponential models were fitted well to the experimental glucose release data at simulated gastric condition (SGC) and SIC, respectively (R2 = 0.858-0.991). After digestion at SIC, the consistency coefficient (k) values drastically decreased (73.02-90.27%), while the flow behavior index (n) increased (155.56-363.64%). Therefore, the amounts of glucose release can be controlled by manipulating the structure of native starches using chemical modifications such as cross-linking and hydroxypropylation.
    Food & Function 07/2015;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The digestibility and estimated glycemic indices (GI) of native (NWS), cross-linked (CLWS) and hydroxypropylated wheat starches (HPWS) were obtained by in vitro enzymatic hydrolysis. The resistant starch (RS) content and GI were found to be 6.59 and 93.13 for NWS, 7.57 and 92.20 for CLWS, and also 13.15 and 89.04 for HPWS, respectively. The amounts of glucose release for CLWS were approximately 6-11%, and for HPWS were 16-19% lower than that for NWS after digestion at simulated intestinal condition (SIC). The linear and two-term exponential models were fitted well to the experimental glucose release data at simulated gastric condition (SGC) and SIC, respectively (R2 = 0.858-0.991). After digestion at SIC, the consistency coefficient (k) values drastically decreased (73.02-90.27%), while the flow behavior index (n) increased (155.56-363.64%). Therefore, the amounts of glucose release can be controlled by manipulating the structure of native starches using chemical modifications such as cross-linking and hydroxypropylation.
    Food & Function 07/2015; DOI:10.1039/C5FO00637F
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    ABSTRACT: The present study was aimed to assess the macronutrient composition and the amino acid and vitamin E profiles of Castanea sativa shell from different production regions of Portugal (Minho, Trás-os-Montes and Beira-Alta). The nutritional composition was similar for all samples, with a high moisture content and low fat amounts. Arginine and leucine were the predominant essential amino acids (EAA) accounting for 3.55-7.21% and 1.59-2.08%, respectively, for samples of the different production zones. All the shells presented high contents of vitamin E (481.5 mg per 100 g sample, 962.8 mg per 100 g sample and 567.5 mg per 100 g sample, respectively, for Minho, Trás-os-Montes and Beira-Alta). The predominant vitamer was γ-tocopherol (670 mg per 100 g sample for Trás-os-Montes). The antimicrobial and antioxidant activities of C. sativa shell were also determined. Trás-os-Montes extracts displayed the highest antioxidant activity (EC50 = 31.8 ± 1.3 μg mL(-1) for DPPH; 8083.5 ± 164.8 μmol per mg db for FRAP). The total phenolic content (TPC) varied from 241.9 mg to 796.8 mg gallic acid equivalents (GAE) per g db sample, the highest TPC being obtained for Trás-os-Montes. The total flavonoid content (TFC) varied from 31.4 to 43.3 mg of catechin equivalents (CEQ) per g db sample. No antimicrobial activity was observed. The results showed the potentialities of C. sativa shell extracts.
    Food & Function 06/2015; DOI:10.1039/c5fo00571j
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    ABSTRACT: Fourteen vitex honeys from China were investigated to evaluate its antioxidant and hepatoprotective activity against paracetamol-induced liver damage. All honey samples exhibited high total phenolic content (344–520 mg GAE per kg), total flavonoid content (19–31 mg Rutin per kg), and strong antioxidant activity in DPPH radical scavenging, ferric reducing antioxidant power and Ferrous ion-chelating ability. Nine phenolic acids were detected in vitex honey samples, in which caffeic acid was the main compound. Honey from Heibei Zanhuang (S2) ranked the highest antioxidant activity was orally administered to mice (5 g kg−1, 20 g kg−1) for 70 days. In high-dose (20 g kg−1), vitex honey pretreatment resulting in significant increase in serum oxygen radical absorbance capacity (15.07%) and decrease in Cu2+- mediate lipoprotein oxidation (80.07%), and suppression in alanine aminotransferase (75.79%) and aspartate aminotransferase (74.52%), enhancement in the superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activities and reduction in malondialdehyde (36.15%) and 8-hydroxy-2’-deoxyguanosine (19.6%) formation compared with paracetamol-intoxicated group. The results demonstrated the hepatoprotection of vitex honey against paracetamol-induced liver damage might attribute to its antioxidant and/or perhaps prooxidative property.
    Food & Function 06/2015; 6(7). DOI:10.1039/c5fo00345h