Food & Function Journal Impact Factor & Information

Publisher: Royal Society of Chemistry

Journal description

Current impact factor: 2.91

Impact Factor Rankings

2015 Impact Factor Available summer 2015
2013 / 2014 Impact Factor 2.907
2012 Impact Factor 2.694
2011 Impact Factor 1.179

Impact factor over time

Impact factor
Year

Additional details

5-year impact 2.70
Cited half-life 1.60
Immediacy index 0.55
Eigenfactor 0.00
Article influence 0.60
ISSN 2042-6496

Publisher details

Royal Society of Chemistry

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Pre-prints on non-commercial repositories and arXiv
    • Post-print on author's personal website
    • Author's post-print on institutional repository after 12 months from acceptance
    • Publisher's version/PDF may be used on author's personal website only
    • Publisher PDF will be supplied and may be used on author's personal website only
    • RSC will deposit the authors post-print, if appropriate in non-commercial repositories, not limited to funder's repositories after 12 months
    • Restrictions on further re-use and further distribution to be noted
  • Classification
    ​ green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Berries are an excellent source of bioactive compounds such as vitamins, minerals but above all polyphenols with anthocyanins as the most representative compounds. Several in vitro and in vivo studies documented the beneficial effects of berries and their bioactives in the modulation of numerous cell functions related to oxidative stress and/or antioxidant protection. The following review summarizes published results about the role of berries (either fresh, juice, freeze-dried or dehydrated) on total plasma and serum antioxidant status and on the modulation of biomarkers of oxidative stress in acute and chronic human intervention trials. The biomarkers considered include DNA, protein and lipid oxidation, and endogenous antioxidant enzymes. Though limited, there is indication that the consumption of berries may reduce oxidative stress by modulating protein and lipid oxidation, and by improving total antioxidant status. In particular, these effects are more evident following medium/long term interventions with respect to postprandial studies. Benefits are observed in healthy subjects as well as in those with cardiovascular risk factors or other diseases. On the contrary, data regarding the effect of berries on DNA damage and endogenous antioxidant enzyme activities are still scarce and inconclusive. In conclusion, much remains to be elucidated before a comprehensive understanding of the effects of berries on the modulation of oxidative stress markers is achieved. Robust clinical evidence supporting the role of berries in counteracting oxidative stress in humans is encouraged.
    Food & Function 07/2015; DOI:10.1039/C5FO00657K
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    ABSTRACT: The digestibility and estimated glycemic indices (GI) of native (NWS), cross-linked (CLWS) and hydroxypropylated wheat starches (HPWS) were obtained by in vitro enzymatic hydrolysis. The resistant starch (RS) content and GI were found to be 6.59 and 93.13 for NWS, 7.57 and 92.20 for CLWS, and also 13.15 and 89.04 for HPWS, respectively. The amounts of glucose release for CLWS were approximately 6-11%, and for HPWS were 16-19% lower than that for NWS after digestion at simulated intestinal condition (SIC). The linear and two-term exponential models were fitted well to the experimental glucose release data at simulated gastric condition (SGC) and SIC, respectively (R2 = 0.858-0.991). After digestion at SIC, the consistency coefficient (k) values drastically decreased (73.02-90.27%), while the flow behavior index (n) increased (155.56-363.64%). Therefore, the amounts of glucose release can be controlled by manipulating the structure of native starches using chemical modifications such as cross-linking and hydroxypropylation.
    Food & Function 07/2015;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The digestibility and estimated glycemic indices (GI) of native (NWS), cross-linked (CLWS) and hydroxypropylated wheat starches (HPWS) were obtained by in vitro enzymatic hydrolysis. The resistant starch (RS) content and GI were found to be 6.59 and 93.13 for NWS, 7.57 and 92.20 for CLWS, and also 13.15 and 89.04 for HPWS, respectively. The amounts of glucose release for CLWS were approximately 6-11%, and for HPWS were 16-19% lower than that for NWS after digestion at simulated intestinal condition (SIC). The linear and two-term exponential models were fitted well to the experimental glucose release data at simulated gastric condition (SGC) and SIC, respectively (R2 = 0.858-0.991). After digestion at SIC, the consistency coefficient (k) values drastically decreased (73.02-90.27%), while the flow behavior index (n) increased (155.56-363.64%). Therefore, the amounts of glucose release can be controlled by manipulating the structure of native starches using chemical modifications such as cross-linking and hydroxypropylation.
    Food & Function 07/2015; DOI:10.1039/C5FO00637F
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    ABSTRACT: The present study was aimed to assess the macronutrient composition and the amino acid and vitamin E profiles of Castanea sativa shell from different production regions of Portugal (Minho, Trás-os-Montes and Beira-Alta). The nutritional composition was similar for all samples, with a high moisture content and low fat amounts. Arginine and leucine were the predominant essential amino acids (EAA) accounting for 3.55-7.21% and 1.59-2.08%, respectively, for samples of the different production zones. All the shells presented high contents of vitamin E (481.5 mg per 100 g sample, 962.8 mg per 100 g sample and 567.5 mg per 100 g sample, respectively, for Minho, Trás-os-Montes and Beira-Alta). The predominant vitamer was γ-tocopherol (670 mg per 100 g sample for Trás-os-Montes). The antimicrobial and antioxidant activities of C. sativa shell were also determined. Trás-os-Montes extracts displayed the highest antioxidant activity (EC50 = 31.8 ± 1.3 μg mL(-1) for DPPH; 8083.5 ± 164.8 μmol per mg db for FRAP). The total phenolic content (TPC) varied from 241.9 mg to 796.8 mg gallic acid equivalents (GAE) per g db sample, the highest TPC being obtained for Trás-os-Montes. The total flavonoid content (TFC) varied from 31.4 to 43.3 mg of catechin equivalents (CEQ) per g db sample. No antimicrobial activity was observed. The results showed the potentialities of C. sativa shell extracts.
    Food & Function 06/2015; DOI:10.1039/c5fo00571j
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    ABSTRACT: This work reports the antioxidant, antimicrobial, and inhibitory effects of methanol and water extracts from Ganoderma applanatum (GAM: methanol extract and GAW: water extract) and G. resinaceum (GRM: methanol extract and GRW: water extract) against cholinesterase, tyrosinase, α-amylase and α-glucosidase. The total phenolics, flavonoids contents, and HPLC profile of phenolic components present in the extracts, were also determined. Antioxidant activities were investigated by using different assays, including DPPH, ABTS, FRAP, CUPRAC, phosphomolybdenum and metal chelating assays. Antimicrobial activity of the tested Ganoderma extracts was also studied by the broth microdilution method. Generally, the highest antioxidant (59.24 mg TEs per g extract for DPPH, 41.32 mg TEs per g extract for ABTS, 41.35 mg TEs per g extract for CUPRAC, 49.68 mg TEs per g extract for FRAP, 130.57 mg AAEs per g extract for phosphomolybdenum and 26.92 mg EDTAEs per g extract) and enzyme inhibitory effects (1.47 mg GALAEs per g extract for AChE, 1.51 mg GALAEs per g extract for BChE, 13.40 mg KAEs per g extract for tyrosinase, 1.13 mmol ACEs per g extract for α-amylase and 2.20 mmol ACEs per g extract for α-glucosidase) were observed in GRM, which had the highest concentrations of phenolics (37.32 mg GAEs g(-1) extract). Again, Ganoderma extracts possess weak antibacterial and antifungal activities. Apigenin and protocatechuic acid were determined as the main components in GRM (1761 μg per g extract) and GAM (165 μg per g extract), respectively. The results suggest that the Ganoderma species may be considered as a candidate for preparing new food supplements and can represent a good model for the development of new drug formulations.
    Food & Function 06/2015; DOI:10.1039/c5fo00665a
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    ABSTRACT: Polyphenol-rich fruit and vegetable intake has been associated with reduction in platelet hyperactivity, a significant contributor to thrombus formation. This study was undertaken to investigate the possible role of hippuric acid, a predominant metabolite of plant cyclic polyols, phenolic acids and polyphenols, in reduction of platelet activation-related thrombogenesis. Fasting blood samples were collected from 13 healthy subjects to analyse the effect of varying concentrations of hippuric acid (100 µM, 200 µM, 500 µM, 1 mM and 2 mM) on activation-dependant platelet surface-marker expression. Procaspase activating compound-1 (PAC-1) and P-selectin/CD62P monoclonal antibodies were used to evaluate platelet activation-related conformational changes and α-granule release respectively using flow cytometry. Platelets were stimulated ex vivo via the P2Y1/P2Y12 – adenosine diphosphate (ADP) pathway of platelet activation. Hippuric acid at a concentration of 1 mM and 2 mM significantly reduced P-selectin/CD62P expression (p=0.03 and p<0.001 respectively) induced by ADP. Hippuric acid at 2 mM concentration also inhibited PAC-1 activation-dependant antibody expression (p=0.03). High ex vivo concentrations of hippuric acid can therefore significantly reduce P-selectin and PAC-1 expression thus reducing platelet activation and clotting potential. However, although up to 11 mM of hippuric acid can be excreted in the urine per day following consumption of fruit, hippuric acid is actively excreted with a recorded Cmax for hippuric acid in human plasma at 250-300 μM. This is lower than the blood concentration of 1-2 mM shown to be bioactive in this research. The contribution of hippuric acid to the protective effects of fruit and vegetable intake against vascular disorders by the pathways measured is therefore low but could be synergistic with lowered doses of antiplatelet drugs and help reduce risk of thrombosis in current antiplatelet drug sensitive populations.
    Food & Function 06/2015; DOI:10.1039/C5FO00715A
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    ABSTRACT: Fourteen vitex honeys from China were investigated to evaluate its antioxidant and hepatoprotective activity against paracetamol-induced liver damage. All honey samples exhibited high total phenolic content (344–520 mg GAE per kg), total flavonoid content (19–31 mg Rutin per kg), and strong antioxidant activity in DPPH radical scavenging, ferric reducing antioxidant power and Ferrous ion-chelating ability. Nine phenolic acids were detected in vitex honey samples, in which caffeic acid was the main compound. Honey from Heibei Zanhuang (S2) ranked the highest antioxidant activity was orally administered to mice (5 g kg−1, 20 g kg−1) for 70 days. In high-dose (20 g kg−1), vitex honey pretreatment resulting in significant increase in serum oxygen radical absorbance capacity (15.07%) and decrease in Cu2+- mediate lipoprotein oxidation (80.07%), and suppression in alanine aminotransferase (75.79%) and aspartate aminotransferase (74.52%), enhancement in the superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activities and reduction in malondialdehyde (36.15%) and 8-hydroxy-2’-deoxyguanosine (19.6%) formation compared with paracetamol-intoxicated group. The results demonstrated the hepatoprotection of vitex honey against paracetamol-induced liver damage might attribute to its antioxidant and/or perhaps prooxidative property.
    Food & Function 06/2015; DOI:10.1039/c5fo00345h
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    ABSTRACT: Renal dysfunction is one of the major effects of DOCA (deoxycorticosterone acetate)-salt hypertension and there is an increasing amount of evidence that oxidative stress damages the function of the kidney. Grape seed proanthocyanidins (GSPE) have been reported to be potent anti-oxidants and free radical scavengers. The present study sought to investigate the ability of GSPE to prevent renal injury in DOCA-salt hypertensive rats and to explore the molecular mechanisms underlying its protective effects. A total of 54 Sprague Dawley (SD) rats were randomly divided into 7 groups: Sham group (n = 7), UnX-sham group (n = 8), DOCA-salt group (n = 8), GSPE150 group (150 mg kg(-1), n = 7), GSPE240 group (240 mg kg(-1), n = 8), GSPE384 group (384 mg kg(-1), n = 8) and ALM (amlodipine besylate tablets) group (5 mg kg(-1), n = 8), and treated for 4 weeks. Compared to sham group rats, renal injury was observed in DOCA-salt hypertensive group rats as the urine protein, KW/BW (kidney weight/body weight), degree of renal fibrosis, renal MDA (malondialdehyde) and Hyp (hydroxyproline) contents significantly increased (P < 0.01). Moreover, SOD (Superoxide Dismutase) activities decreased in the model group (P < 0.01). In contrast, DOCA-salt hypertensive rats treated with different dose of GSPE or ALM showed a significant improvement of renal injury with decreased urine protein, KW/BW, degree of renal fibrosis, renal total MDA and Hyp contents compared to the untreated group. In addition, SOD activities increased in the treatment group. Since the experimental modeling time was short, kidney damage occurs to a lesser extent. BUN (Blood Urea Nitrogen), Scr (Serum Creatinine) and UA (Uric Acid) contents did not appear significantly changed in all groups. Finally, the activation of JNK and p38 kinases in the kidney was suppressed in rats treated with GSPEs or ALM compared to the untreated group, suggesting that the inhibition of these kinase pathways by GSPE contributes to the improvement of renal function. Taking these results together, we conclude that the anti-hypertensive and anti-oxidative stress beneficial effects of GSPE on renal injury in rats with DOCA-salt hypertension occur via the attenuation of JNK and p38 activity.
    Food & Function 05/2015; DOI:10.1039/C5FO00253B
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    ABSTRACT: several studies have investigated the relationship between the estrogen receptor (ER) gene polymorphisms and the efficacy of estrogen replacement therapy in postmenopausal osteoporosis. However, the association of ER polymorphisms with the effects of dietary phytoestrogens on bone metabolism has not yet been reported. This study explores the possibility that ER alpha subtype (ERα) gene polymorphisms are involved in the effects of dietary phytoestrogens on bone mineral density (BMD) in postmenopausal women. a total of 301 postmenopausal southern Chinese women were enrolled. Dietary phytoestrogen intake was evaluated using a food frequency questionnaire. ERα polymorphisms were examined with restriction fragment length polymorphism at the polymorphic PvuII and XbaI sites within intron 1. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scans were performed to determine the BMD of the lumbar spine and hip. the positive association of the lumbar spine BMD with dietary phytoestrogen intake was maintained only in groups with pp or xx genotypes (p < 0.05) and disappeared in groups with other genotypes. A positive association of the hip BMD with dietary phytoestrogen intake was observed only in the xx genotype group (p < 0.05). the association of the dietary phytoestrogen intake and BMD in southern Chinese postmenopausal women varied with ERα gene polymorphisms.
    Food & Function 05/2015; 6(6). DOI:10.1039/C5FO00295H
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    ABSTRACT: Compounds in Fructus Gardeniae have been shown to possess a wide array of biological activities. However, Gardenia oil extracted from its fruit is still less reported, and its composition remains uncertain. To fully characterize lipophilic compounds in Gardenia oil, three conventional extraction (CE) and ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) methods were investigated. The oil extraction yield obtained by UAE was 51.8% higher than that of cold-pressed extraction (CPE) acquired. The fatty acid profile in UAE oil with different solvents was characterized by GC-MS. Petroleum ether was observed to be an ideal solvent with 8.59% extraction yield and 78.88% recovery rate, and with 3.11 ratios of unsaturated fatty acids to saturated fatty acids. Response surface methodology (RSM) with Box–Behnken Design (BBD) was applied to optimize conditions in UEA of oil to maximize extraction yield. Furthermore, the bioactive components in oil extracted by UAE were qualitatively identified and quantified by HPLC-DAD/ESI-MS2 and HPLC-DAD analysis. The eight compounds in Gardenia oil including geniposide, trans/cis-crocin-1, crocin-2, crocin-3, crocin-4, and trans/cis-crocetin were structurally revealed. The corresponding transfer rates of the bioactive components showed that the lipophilic trans/Cis-crocetin could be completely transferred from fruit to oil, with the highest concentration of 11.38 μg/g oil among all compounds quantified. These findings could deliver the potential application and large-scale production of functional Gardenia oil with bioactive components possessed health benefits.
    Food & Function 05/2015; DOI:10.1039/C5FO00205B