Equine Veterinary Journal (EQUINE VET J )

Publisher: British Equine Veterinary Association

Journal description

This unrivalled international scientific journal was first published in 1968 when there were four issues each year. It now appears bi-monthly with around 88 pages per issue containing articles with original and potentially important findings. Contributions are received from sources worldwide, including North America, Europe and Australia. EVJ has also produced a number of Special Issues, which generally appear as an additional 7th issue devoted to a specific topic, including Immunology, Colic, Evidence-Based Medicine and Laminitis. These extra journals are distributed free to all subscribers, and are available to purchase from the EVJ Online Bookshop. All papers published in the journal are subjected to peer review and once articles have been accepted for publication they should appear in the journal within six to eight months. They present new developments in research being carried out by universities, veterinary schools and institutes devoted to equine and/or comparative physiology, pathology, medicine or surgery and from workers in practice. The journal strives to publish clinically orientated work and categorises articles into General Articles, Clinical Evidence Articles, Short Communications, Case Reports and Review Articles. General Articles are often accompanied by an Editorial Leader which gives the reader a further insight into a particular topic and provides further reference information. The Clinical Evidence category was introduced in 2003, for articles in which the objective is to answer questions of clinical importance in a controlled manner based on data obtainable in practice.

Current impact factor: 2.37

Impact Factor Rankings

2015 Impact Factor Available summer 2015
2013 / 2014 Impact Factor 2.369
2012 Impact Factor 2.286
2011 Impact Factor 1.456
2010 Impact Factor 1.799
2009 Impact Factor 1.837
2008 Impact Factor 2.08

Impact factor over time

Impact factor
Year

Additional details

5-year impact 2.19
Cited half-life 0.00
Immediacy index 1.06
Eigenfactor 0.01
Article influence 0.43
Website Equine Veterinary Journal website
ISSN 2042-3306
OCLC 225017606
Material type Periodical
Document type Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publications in this journal

  • Equine Veterinary Journal 03/2015; 47(2).
  • Equine Veterinary Journal 03/2015;
  • Equine Veterinary Journal 03/2015; 47(2):131-2.
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    ABSTRACT: See article by Naylor et al. and correspondence by Freeman. © 2015 EVJ Ltd.
    Equine Veterinary Journal 03/2015; 47(2):250.
  • Equine Veterinary Journal 03/2015; 47(2).
  • Equine Veterinary Journal 03/2015; 47(2).
  • Equine Veterinary Journal 02/2015;
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    ABSTRACT: Epiploic Foramen Entrapment (EFE) is, based on the number of reports in the literature, a relatively important life threatening cause of colic in horses that could be prevented by closing the epiploic foramen (EF) in horses at risk of developing EFE. To describe the laparoscopic Foramen Epiploicum Mesh Closure (FEMC) technique and its outcome. Descriptive experimental study. The EF of 6 horses was closed with the FEMC technique. A diabolo-shaped constructed mesh was introduced in the omental vestibule through the EF under laparoscopic visualisation in the standing sedated horse. Clinical and laboratory parameters were recorded during the post-operative period. Four weeks after the intervention, repeat laparoscopy was performed in all horses. Three horses were subjected to euthanasia one, 2 and 3 months after the intervention, and were examined on necropsy and histopathology. The remaining 3 horses were followed clinically for 6 months. The 6 FEMC procedures were performed successfully in a median surgery time of 22 min (range, 18-27 min). One horse was treated for large colon impaction in the immediate post-operative period. On repeat laparoscopy at 4 weeks all 6 EFs were closed and no undesired adhesions were identified. This was confirmed on gross and histopathologic examination of the 3 euthanised horses. The 3 remaining horses were clinically normal in the 6 month post-operative observation period. This FEMC technique provides a fast, simple, reliable and safe procedure to obliterate the EF and may be useful in horses at risk for EFE. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
    Equine Veterinary Journal 02/2015;
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    ABSTRACT: Reasons for studyThe relative influence of obesity and the adaptation to high-glycaemic diets on the development of insulin dysregulation in equids is unclear.Objectives To determine whether increased adiposity per se is responsible for the decreased insulin sensitivity (SI) often observed in obese horses, or whether a dietary glycaemic response is critically important.Study designRandomised controlled trial.Methods Eighteen horses and ponies were studied over a 20-week period. They received ad libitum hay, plus either a high-fat (low-glycaemic) diet (FAT; n = 6) or a similar (isocaloric) diet containing 1.5 g/kg bwt once daily glucose (GLU; n = 6) to induce obesity. A third group received a control ration (CON; n = 6). Adiposity was monitored using body condition score (BCS), and total body fat mass percentage (TBFM) was determined using a deuterium oxide dilution technique. Insulin sensitivity was assessed using a frequently-sampled intravenous glucose tolerance test. Plasma concentrations of glucose, insulin, leptin, adiponectin, tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and serum amyloid A (SAA) were measured.ResultsThe FAT and GLU groups became obese (BCS ≥7), whilst the CON group maintained moderate condition (BCS ≤6). Total body fat mass and leptin concentrations were increased in the FAT and GLU groups compared with the CON group (P<0.001 and P = 0.003, respectively). Values for both insulin-dependent (SI) and insulin-independent (Sg) glucose disposal were higher in the GLU group compared with the FAT and CON groups (P = 0.006 and P = 0.03, respectively). There were no differences in adiponectin, TNF-α or SAA between groups (all P≥0.4).Conclusions Increased adiposity did not decrease insulin sensitivity in either the FAT or GLU diet groups, suggesting that obesity per se might not be responsible for the lower SI values reported in previous studies. Contrary to expectations, once daily glucose appeared to increase insulin sensitivity. Further work is required into the dietary causes of insulin resistance in equids.This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
    Equine Veterinary Journal 02/2015;
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    ABSTRACT: Reasons for performing the studyPharyngeal dysphagia is a debilitating, sometimes fatal condition in horses with multiple etiologies. The pathophysiology is complex and not fully understood. Treatment is largely supportive. Laryngeal advancement surgery may diminish dysphagia symptoms and improve swallowing in affected horses.Objectives1) Induce reversible moderate and marked pharyngeal dysphagia by regional anaesthesia of branches of the glossopharyngeal (IX), vagus (X), and hypoglossal (XII) nerves, 2) Characterise the dysphagia produced by each model, and 3) Determine if laryngeal advancement surgery improves swallowing in these models.Study DesignExperimental design using 6 adult horses.Methods Two dysphagia models were produced by blocking IX, the pharyngeal branch of X (pX) and XII unilaterally (moderate model) and only pX bilaterally (marked model) within the guttural pouches. Both models were performed on each horse before and after surgery in order to assess the effectiveness of the surgical procedure as a potential treatment for pharyngeal dysphagia. Dysphagia was scored by partially blinded observers on a scale of 0 - 12 based on observations of eating (non-blinded), endoscopic examinations and fluoroscopic swallowing (blinded), where 0 = normal swallow and 12 = severe dysphagia with tracheal aspiration. Data were analysed by 3-factor ANOVA, p<0.05.ResultsDysphagia models were reversible and horses swallowed normally within 3 h of model induction. The marked dysphagia model impaired movement of feed from the base of the tongue to the oesophagus and caused severe airway contamination. Average dysphagia score (mean ± s.d.) for the marked dysphagia model prior to surgery was 10.6 ± 1.1 and 6.1 ± 4.3 after surgery, p = 0.007. Laryngeal advancement surgery did not significantly improve the dysphagia scores in the moderate model, p = 0.5.Conclusions Laryngeal advancement surgery may improve swallowing and reduce aspiration in horses affected with diseases that cause pharyngeal dysphagia.
    Equine Veterinary Journal 02/2015;
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    ABSTRACT: Reasons for performing studyFetal membrane retention can be a life threatening condition and its incidence exceeds 50% in heavy draught mares. Although fetal membrane retention is commonly treated with repeated injections of oxytocin, based on the suggestion that it is caused mainly by secondary atony of the uterus, this treatment sometimes fails. This led us to ask if expression of oxytocin receptors differs in mares that retain fetal membranes due to secondary uterine atony.Objective To determine whether expression of oxytocin receptors in equine placental tissues differs when heavy draught mares expel fetal membranes or retain them because of secondary uterine atony.Study designControlled study using archived tissues.Methods Placental biopsies (containing the endometrium and the allantochorion) were taken from 8 heavy draught mares during parturition. 4 mares expelled fetal membranes shortly after foaling (control mares), and 4 mares retained them (expulsion time was >3 h from delivery). The 4 mares that retained fetal membranes had secondary atony of the uterus. The amount of oxytocin receptors was estimated by measuring the intensity of Western Blot bands. The presence and location of oxytocin receptors were determined by immunocytochemistry.ResultsOxytocin receptor expression was nearly 50 times less intense in mares with placenta retention due to secondary atony of the uterus, and immunocytochemical staining was barely visible. In the control mares, oxytocin receptors were found in both epithelial and endothelial cells of the placenta, and staining was most intense where the endometrium contacts the allantochorion.Conclusions Inadequate expression of oxytocin receptors may be a cause of uterine atony leading to fetal membrane retention.
    Equine Veterinary Journal 01/2015;
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    ABSTRACT: Reason for performing studyPostoperative imaging in subjects with orthopaedic implants is challenging across all modalities. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is preferred to assess human postoperative musculoskeletal complications, as soft tissue and bones are evaluated without using ionising radiation. However, with conventional MRI pulse sequences, metal creates susceptibility artifact that distorts anatomy. Assessment of the postoperative equine patient is arguably more challenging due to the volume of metal present, and MRI is often not performed in horses with implants. Novel pulse sequences such as multi-acquisition variable resonance image combination (MAVRIC) now provide improved visibility in the vicinity of surgical-grade implants and offer an option for imaging horses with metal implants.Objectives To compare conspicuity of regional anatomy in an equine fracture-repair model using MAVRIC, narrow receiver bandwidth fast spin echo (NBW FSE), and wide receiver bandwidth (WBW) FSE sequences.Study DesignNon-randomised in vitro experiment.MethodsMAVRIC, NBW FSE and WBW FSE were performed on 9 cadaveric distal limbs with fractures and stainless steel implants in the 3rd metacarpal bone and proximal phalanx. Objective measures of artifact reduction were performed by calculating the total artifact area in each transverse image as a percentage of the total anatomic area. The number of transverse images in which fracture lines were visible was tabulated for each sequence. Regional soft tissue conspicuity was assessed subjectively.ResultsOverall anatomic delineation was improved using MAVRIC compared to NBW FSE; delineation of structures closest to the metal implants was improved using MAVRIC compared to WBW FSE and NBW FSE. Total artifact area was the highest for NBW FSE and lowest for MAVRIC; the total number of transverse slices with a visible fracture line was highest in MAVRIC and lowest in NBW FSE.ConclusionMAVRIC and WBW FSE are feasible additions to minimise artifact around implants.
    Equine Veterinary Journal 01/2015;
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    ABSTRACT: Reasons for performing studyStrongylus vulgaris is a pathogenic helminth parasite infecting horses and was once considered to be the primary cause of colic. Migrating larvae cause ischaemia and infarction of intestinal segments. This knowledge is derived from case reports and experimental inoculations of parasite-naïve foals, and it remains unknown to which extent the parasite is associated with different types of colic.Objectives To evaluate the role of S. vulgaris as a risk factor for different types of colic in horses.Study designA retrospective case-control study among horses referred with abdominal pain to the University of Copenhagen Large Animal Teaching Hospital during 2009-2011.Methods Each colic case was matched with a patient of the same type (pony, warmblooded, coldblooded), age, sex, and admitted in the same month and year, but for problems unrelated to the gastrointestinal tract. Serum samples were analysed for antibodies to migrating S. vulgaris larvae using a recently developed ELISA. Four case definitions were used; colic sensu lato i.e. all horses presenting with colic (n = 274), with further sub-groups i.e. undiagnosed colics (n = 48), strangulating obstructions (n = 76), and non-strangulating infarctions (n = 20).ResultsStrongylus vulgaris antibody levels were similar to controls in colics sensu lato and horses with undiagnosed colic. In contrast, non-strangulating intestinal infarctions associated significantly with positive S. vulgaris ELISAs (OR = 5.33, 95%CI 1.03-27.76, P = 0.05). Also, horses with non-strangulating infarctions had a significantly higher occurrence of positive ELISAs than patients with strangulating obstructions (OR = 3.79, 95%CI 1.34-10.68 P = 0.01) and the colic sensu lato group (OR = 3.09, 95%CI, 1.20-8.01, P = 0.02).Conclusions Non-strangulating intestinal infarction associated strongly with S. vulgaris-specific antibodies whereas the broader defined colic categories were not associated with positive ELISA results. Thus, the ELISA holds potential to become a helpful adjunct in diagnosis and management of horses with colic.
    Equine Veterinary Journal 01/2015;
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    ABSTRACT: See article by Preston et al. and also response by Preston and Riggs. © 2015 EVJ Ltd.
    Equine Veterinary Journal 01/2015;
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    ABSTRACT: The equine limb has evolved for efficient locomotion and high-speed performance, with adaptations of bone, tendon and muscle. However, the system lacks the ability seen in some species to dynamically adapt to different circumstances.The mechanical interaction of the limb and the ground is influenced by internal and external factors including fore-hind mass distribution, lead limb, moving on a curve, shoeing and surface properties. It is unclear which of the components of limb loading have the largest effect on injury and performance but peak load, impact and vibration all play a role. Factors related to the foot-ground interface that limit performance are poorly understood. Peak performance varies vastly between disciplines, but at high speeds - such as racing and polo - force and grip are key limits to performance.
    Equine Veterinary Journal 01/2015;
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    ABSTRACT: Survey data on equine tumours are sparse compared with other species and may have changed over time. To describe the most frequently diagnosed equine tumours recorded by a diagnostic pathology laboratory over 29 years, to identify signalment factors associated with tumour type, and to identify any changes in the tumours diagnosed or the signalment of cases submitted during the study period. Observational; cross sectional analysis of records of a diagnostic pathology laboratory. The records of all neoplastic equine histology submissions to the University of Bristol (January 1982 - December 2010) were accessed from a database, and a list of diagnoses compiled. The 6 most commonly diagnosed tumour types were analysed using logistic regression to identify signalment factors associated with tumour type. The overall population of equine tumour submissions and the relative frequency of diagnosis of the most common tumour types were compared between decades. 964 cases were included. The most frequently diagnosed tumours were: sarcoid (24% cases), squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) (19%), lymphoma (14%), melanoma (6%), gonadal stromal tumour (6%) and mast cell tumour (MCT) (4%). With sarcoid, Thoroughbred/Thoroughbred X and gelding as reference categories: increasing age was significantly associated with the odds of each of the other tumour types, mares were at reduced risk of SCC, Arab/ArabX had a higher risk of MCT, Cob/CobX had an increased risk of SCC and MCT, and Ponies had an increased risk of melanoma. The mean age of submissions increased in each successive decade and the breed composition became broader. Sarcoids and lymphoma formed a smaller proportion of diagnoses in later decades. The types of tumours submitted to this laboratory have changed over the last 3 decades. Current data informs clinicians and researchers and further studies are warranted to follow trends. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
    Equine Veterinary Journal 01/2015;
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    ABSTRACT: Reference values for quantitative electromyography (QEMG) in shoulder and hindlimb muscles of horses are limited. To determine normative data on quantitative electromyography (QEMG) analysis of Supraspinatus (SS), Infraspinatus (IS), Deltoideus (DT) and Biceps femoris (BF) muscles. Experimental observational study and retrospective case series. Seven adult healthy Royal Dutch Sport horses underwent quantitative motor unit action potential (QMUAP) analysis of each muscle using commercial electromyography equipment. Measurements were made according to published methods. One-way ANOVA was used to compare QMUAP variables between muscles and posthoc testing according to Bonferroni, with p-value set at <0.05. QEMG and clinical information from horses with lower motor neuron disorders (n = 7) or myopathy (n = 4) were summarised retrospectively. 95% confidence intervals of duration, amplitude, phases, turns, area, and size index (SI) of QMUAP were 8.7-10.4 ms, 651-867 μV, 3.2-3.7, 3.7-4.7, 1054-1457 μV·ms, and 1.1-1.5 for SS muscle, 9.6-11.0 ms, 779-1082 μV, 3.3-3.7, 3.8-4.7, 1349-2204 μV·ms, and 1.4-1.9 for IS muscle, 6.0-9.1 ms, 370-691 μV, 2.9-3.7, 2.8-4.5, 380-1374 μV·ms, and 0.3-1.3 for DT muscle, and 5.7-7.8 ms, 265-385 μV, 2.7-3.2, 2.6-3.1, 296-484 μV·ms, and 0.2-0.5 for BF muscle, respectively. Mean duration, amplitude, number of phases and turns, area and SI were significantly (P<0.01) higher in SS and IS than DT and BF muscles. In addition, 4 of 7 normal horses had >15% polyphasic motor unit action potentials in SS and IS muscles. Differences between muscles should be taken into account when performing QEMG in order to be able to distinguish normal horses from horses with suspected neurogenic or myogenic disorders. These normal data provide the basis for objective QEMG assessment of shoulder and hindlimb muscles. QEMG appears to be helpful in diagnosing neuropathies and discriminating these from myopathies. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
    Equine Veterinary Journal 01/2015;
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    ABSTRACT: Failure of lamellar energy metabolism, with or without ischaemia, may be important in the pathophysiology of sepsis-associated laminitis. To examine lamellar perfusion and energy balance during laminitis development in the oligofructose model using tissue microdialysis. In vivo experiment. Six Standardbred horses underwent laminitis induction using the oligofructose model (OFT) and 6 horses were untreated controls (CON). Microdialysis probes were placed in the lamellar tissue of one forelimb (all horses) as well as the skin dermis of the tail in OFT horses. Dialysate and plasma samples were collected every 2 h for 24 h and concentrations of energy metabolites (glucose, lactate, pyruvate) and standard indices of energy metabolism (lactate to glucose ratio [L:G], and lactate to pyruvate ratio [L:P]) were determined. Microdialysis urea clearance was used to estimate changes in tissue perfusion. Data were analysed non-parametrically. Median glucose concentration decreased to <30% of baseline by 8 h in OFT lamellar (p = <0.01) and skin (p<0.01) dialysate. Lactate increased mildly in skin dialysate (p = 0.04) and plasma (p = 0.05), but not lamellar dialysate in OFT horses. Median pyruvate concentration decreased to <50% of baseline in OFT lamellar dialysate (p = 0.03). A >5-fold increase in median L:G compared to baseline occurred in OFT lamellar and skin dialysate (p<0.03). From a baseline of <20, median L:P increased to a peak of 80 in OFT skin and 38.7 in OFT lamellar dialysates (p<0.02), however OFT lamellar dialysate L:P was not significantly different from CON. Urea concentration decreased significantly in OFT lamellar dialysate (increased urea clearance) but not in OFT skin or CON lamellar dialysate. Increased lamellar perfusion occurred during the development of sepsis-associated laminitis in the oligofructose model. Glucose concentrations in the lamellar interstitium decreased, suggesting increased glucose consumption, but there was no definitive evidence of lamellar energy failure. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
    Equine Veterinary Journal 01/2015;