African journal of microbiology research (AFR J MICROBIOL RES )

Description

  • Impact factor
    0.54
  • 5-year impact
    0.56
  • Cited half-life
    1.90
  • Immediacy index
    0.04
  • Eigenfactor
    0.00
  • Article influence
    0.07
  • ISSN
    1996-0808

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This study was performed to investigate the resistance of biofilm forming bacteria isolated from diabetic foot infection to different antibiotics and the eradicating activity of some potential antibiofilm agents alone and in combination with ciprofloxacin. Imipenem was the most active against biofilms formed by all tested strains, while tetracycline was the least active. For biofilms of Gram-positive bacteria, azithromycin and imipenem were the most potent, while tetracycline and vancomycin showed the lowest activity. Similarly, imipenem showed the highest activity against biofilms of Gram-negative bacteria, while ciprofloxacin, tetracycline and cefoperazone were the least active. Potential antibiofilm agents exerted antibacterial and biofilm eradicating activities. Apple and grape vinegars showed the highest activities, followed by estradiol, ambroxol and piroxicam. Dexamethasone, manuka and citrus honeys were less active. Ambroxol showed the highest synergistic activity with ciprofloxacin, followed by dexamethasone, manuka honey, piroxicam, estradiol and grape vinegar, while apple vinegar and citrus honey showed intermediate activity. In conclusion, this study recommends the use of antibiofilm agents in combination with antibiotics to combat the resistance of biofilms to antibiotics.
    African journal of microbiology research 12/2014; 8.
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    ABSTRACT: A multiplex PCR assay for the rapid detection of B. cereus group, enterotoxic and emetic strains was developed. A panel of emetic and enterotoxic reference strains, B. cereus group members and non-target strains were used for the evaluation of the assay. Verification of PCR results on pure culture and inoculated foods successfully confirmed the specificity of approach for detection of target genes for B. cereus group (groEL), diarrheal (cytK, nheA, hblC, entFM) and emetic strains (CER). The sensitivity of approach was satisfying in pure culture as 20 pg of DNA per reaction tube. Artificial contamination of seven different food matrices with distinct bacterial counts revealed a minimum detection limit of 103 cfu/g in food samples. The detection limits were improved to approximately 101 cfu/g after 7 h enrichment. Natural contamination in rice and kimbab as well as environmental samples (soil, cow feces) was studied. The incidence of B. cereus was 63.88 and 38.88% in rice and kimbab, and 84.61 and 69.23% in soil and feces, respectively. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that an assay for simultaneous detection of B. cereus group, emetic and enterotoxic strains with such a wide range of detection target genes in food and environmental samples has been described.
    African journal of microbiology research 11/2014; 8(47):3821-3829.
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    ABSTRACT: This study aimed at evaluating the microbial quality of bottled water available in the Bulawayo market necessitated by the influx of local and imported bottled water brands into the market. The samples were analysed for Escherichia coli, heterotrophic plate count (HPC), total coliforms, feacal coliforms and for Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Total coliforms had a prevalence of 10% in local bottled water brands with bacterial counts not exceeding 30 cfu/250 ml. E. coli and feacal coliforms had prevalence of 2.5 and 5% respectively with maximum counts of 2 cfu/ml for E. coli and 5 cfu/250 ml for feacal coliform counts. P. aeruginosa was detected in 8.6% of local brand samples with counts not exceeding 10 cfu/250 ml. For heterotrophic plate count, 78% of the local brand samples had HPC ≤ 100 cfu/ml with counts as high as 2 x 103 cfu/ml recorded for the non-conforming samples. In the imported brands, 92% of the samples conformed to HPC ≤ 100 cfu/ml while counts for non-conforming samples ranged between 1.17 x 102 and 3.4 x 102 cfu/ml. The imported bottled water brands had significantly (p < 0.05) lower P. aeruginosa and total coliforms counts as compared to local bottled water brands, while there was no significant difference in E. coli, heterotrophic plate count and feacal coliform counts. However, based on International Bottled Water Association and WHO drinking water guidelines, P. aeruginosa, coliforms and E. coli counts in some local and imported bottled water samples exceeded the recommended maximum of no detection. This may have health implications to consumers. The quality of bottled water in the market maybe unsatisfactory for human consumption and warrants the need for strict monitoring and control in the production and trade in bottled water. Key words: Bottled water, microbial quality, bacteriology, Bulawayo market, Zimbabwe.
    African journal of microbiology research 10/2014; 8(42):3656-3661.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This study aimed at evaluating the microbial quality of bottled water available in the Bulawayo market necessitated by the influx of local and imported bottled water brands into the market. The samples were analysed for Escherichia coli, heterotrophic plate count (HPC), total coliforms, feacal coliforms and for Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Total coliforms had a prevalence of 10% in local bottled water brands with bacterial counts not exceeding 30 cfu/250 ml. E. coli and feacal coliforms had prevalence of 2.5 and 5% respectively with maximum counts of 2 cfu/ml for E. coli and 5 cfu/250 ml for feacal coliform counts. P. aeruginosa was detected in 8.6% of local brand samples with counts not exceeding 10 cfu/250 ml. For heterotrophic plate count, 78% of the local brand samples had HPC ≤ 100 cfu/ml with counts as high as 2 x 103 cfu/ml recorded for the non-conforming samples. In the imported brands, 92% of the samples conformed to HPC ≤ 100 cfu/ml while counts for non-conforming samples ranged between 1.17 x 102 and 3.4 x 102 cfu/ml. The imported bottled water brands had significantly (p < 0.05) lower P. aeruginosa and total coliforms counts as compared to local bottled water brands, while there was no significant difference in E. coli, heterotrophic plate count and feacal coliform counts. However, based on International Bottled Water Association and WHO drinking water guidelines, P. aeruginosa, coliforms and E. coli counts in some local and imported bottled water samples exceeded the recommended maximum of no detection. This may have health implications to consumers. The quality of bottled water in the market maybe unsatisfactory for human consumption and warrants the need for strict monitoring and control in the production and trade in bottled water. Key words: Bottled water, microbial quality, bacteriology, Bulawayo market, Zimbabwe.
    African journal of microbiology research 10/2014; Vol.8(42):3656-3661.
  • African journal of microbiology research 09/2014; 8(37):3398-3404.
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    ABSTRACT: A cross-sectional study was conducted at Butajira Municipality abattoir from December, 2009 to April 2010 to investigate the epidemiology of bovine tuberculosis (bTB) in Butajira, Southern Ethiopia. Postmortem examination, mycobacterial culturing and multiplex genus typing techniques were used. An overall prevalence of 9% (40/446) of the animals examined harbor gross tuberculous lesions up on detailed post-mortem examination. Statistically significant difference was observed in the prevalence of bTB between different age groups (χ2 = 11.441, p= 0.003) and body condition scoring (χ2 = 10.384, p = 0.006). Higher prevalence of bTB was observed in older animals and animals with poor body condition. Bacteriological culture of the 40 samples gave growth on 13 with 9 of them acid fast Bacilli (AFB) positive. Genus typing of the AFB positive isolates by multiplex polymerase chain reaction (m-PCR) revealed seven non-tuberculous mycobacterium (NTM) and 1 Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) isolates. Further characterization of the isolates at specific species and investigation of the disease is recommended for controlling it in livestock and safeguard public health. Key words: Abattoir, bovine tuberculosis, Butajira, multiplex genus typing, epidemiology, Ethiopia, postmortem examination, prevalence.
    African journal of microbiology research 08/2014; 8(33):3112-3117.