Science translational medicine (Sci Transl Med)

Publisher: American Association for the Advancement of Science

Journal description

Current impact factor: 14.41

Impact Factor Rankings

2015 Impact Factor Available summer 2015
2013 / 2014 Impact Factor 14.414
2012 Impact Factor 10.757
2011 Impact Factor 7.804
2010 Impact Factor 3.511

Impact factor over time

Impact factor
Year

Additional details

5-year impact 10.48
Cited half-life 1.80
Immediacy index 3.69
Eigenfactor 0.04
Article influence 5.18
ISSN 1946-6242

Publisher details

American Association for the Advancement of Science

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Pre-print may be considered prior publication
    • Pre-print on not-for-profit preprint servers where allowed, please contact editors for clarification
    • Cannot archive until publication
    • Authors retain copyright
    • On author's personal website or institutional repository
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Set statement must accompany post-print (see policy)
    • Published source must be acknowledged with DOI
    • Authors covered by funding agency rules, may post author's post-print in PubMed Central or funder's designated repository after a 6 month embargo
    • Authors covered by funding agency rules, must state on submission, for article to be released in PubMed Central or funder's designated repository after 6 months after publication.
  • Classification
    ​ green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Obesity promotes breast cancer by enhancing the stiffness of breast adipose tissue through changes in the extracellular matrix (Seo et al., this issue). Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.
    Science translational medicine 08/2015; 7(301):301fs34. DOI:10.1126/scitranslmed.aac9446
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    ABSTRACT: A new T helper cell signature in asthma patients highlights the potential impact of a personalized approach to asthma care (Choy et al., this issue). Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.
    Science translational medicine 08/2015; 7(301):301fs33. DOI:10.1126/scitranslmed.aac9737
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    ABSTRACT: The T cell receptor (TCR) protein is a heterodimer composed of an α chain and a β chain. TCR genes undergo somatic DNA rearrangements to generate the diversity of T cell binding specificities needed for effective immunity. Recently, high-throughput immunosequencing methods have been developed to profile the TCR α (TCRA) and TCR β (TCRB) repertoires. However, these methods cannot determine which TCRA and TCRB chains combine to form a specific TCR, which is essential for many functional and therapeutic applications. We describe and validate a method called pairSEQ, which can leverage the diversity of TCR sequences to accurately pair hundreds of thousands of TCRA and TCRB sequences in a single experiment. Our TCR pairing method uses standard laboratory consumables and equipment without the need for single-cell technologies. We show that pairSEQ can be applied to T cells from both blood and solid tissues, such as tumors. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.
    Science translational medicine 08/2015; 7(301):301ra131. DOI:10.1126/scitranslmed.aac5624
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    ABSTRACT: Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) causes respiratory infection in annual epidemics, with infants and the elderly at particular risk of developing severe disease and death. However, despite its importance, no vaccine exists. The chimpanzee adenovirus, PanAd3-RSV, and modified vaccinia virus Ankara, MVA-RSV, are replication-defective viral vectors encoding the RSV fusion (F), nucleocapsid (N), and matrix (M2-1) proteins for the induction of humoral and cellular responses. We performed an open-label, dose escalation, phase 1 clinical trial in 42 healthy adults in which four different combinations of prime/boost vaccinations were investigated for safety and immunogenicity, including both intramuscular (IM) and intranasal (IN) administration of the adenovirus-vectored vaccine. The vaccines were safe and well tolerated, with the most common reported adverse events being mild injection site reactions. No vaccine-related serious adverse events occurred. RSV neutralizing antibody titers rose in response to IM prime with PanAd3-RSV and after IM boost for individuals primed by the IN route. Circulating anti-F immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgA antibody-secreting cells (ASCs) were observed after the IM prime and IM boost. RSV-specific T cell responses were increased after the IM PanAd3-RSV prime and were most efficiently boosted by IM MVA-RSV. Interferon-γ (IFN-γ) secretion after boost was from both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, without detectable T helper cell 2 (TH2) cytokines that have been previously associated with immune pathogenesis following exposure to RSV after the formalin-inactivated RSV vaccine. In conclusion, PanAd3-RSV and MVA-RSV are safe and immunogenic in healthy adults. These vaccine candidates warrant further clinical evaluation of efficacy to assess their potential to reduce the burden of RSV disease. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.
    Science translational medicine 08/2015; 7(300):300ra126. DOI:10.1126/scitranslmed.aac5745
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    ABSTRACT: HIV disease progression appears to be driven by increased immune activation. Given observations that fetal exposure to infectious pathogens in utero can result in reduced immune responses, or tolerance, to those pathogens postnatally, we hypothesized that fetal exposure to HIV may render the fetus tolerant to the virus, thus reducing damage caused by immune activation during infection later in life. To test this hypothesis, fetal rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) were injected with the attenuated virus SIVmac1A11 in utero and challenged with pathogenic SIVmac239 1 year after birth. SIVmac1A11-injected animals had significantly reduced plasma RNA viral loads (P < 0.02) up to 35 weeks after infection. Generalized estimating equations analysis was performed to identify immunologic and clinical measurements associated with plasma RNA viral load. A positive association with plasma RNA viral load was observed with the proportion of CD8(+) T cells expressing the transcription factor, FoxP3, and the proportion of CD4(+) T cells producing the lymphoproliferative cytokine, IL-2. In contrast, an inverse relationship was found with the frequencies of circulating CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells displaying intermediate expression of the proliferation marker, Ki-67. Animals exposed to simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) in utero appeared to have enhanced SIV-specific immune responses, a lower proportion of CD8(+) T cells expressing the exhaustion marker PD-1, and more circulating TH17 cells than controls. Although the development of tolerance was not demonstrated, these data suggest that rhesus monkeys exposed to SIVmac1A11 in utero had distinct immune responses associated with the control of viral replication after postnatal challenge. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.
    Science translational medicine 08/2015; 7(300):300ra125. DOI:10.1126/scitranslmed.aac5547
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    ABSTRACT: A confluence of biological, physical, engineering, computer, and health sciences is setting the stage for a transformative leap toward data-driven, mechanism-based health and health care for each individual. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.
    Science translational medicine 08/2015; 7(300):300ps17. DOI:10.1126/scitranslmed.aaa9970
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    ABSTRACT: Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) is a major cause of lower respiratory tract disease in children and the elderly for which there is still no effective vaccine. We have previously shown that PanAd3-RSV, which is a chimpanzee adenovirus-vectored vaccine candidate that expresses a secreted form of the HRSV F protein together with the N and M2-1 proteins of HRSV, is immunogenic in rodents and nonhuman primates, and protects mice and cotton rats from HRSV challenge. Because the extent to which protection demonstrated in rodent models will translate to humans is unclear, we have exploited the calf model of bovine RSV (BRSV) infection, which mimics HRSV disease in children more closely than do experimental models of unnatural laboratory hosts, to evaluate the safety and efficacy of the PanAd3-RSV vaccine. We show that PanAd3-RSV alone and in combination with a modified vaccinia Ankara expressing the same HRSV antigens (MVA-RSV) induced neutralizing antibodies and cellular immunity in young seronegative calves and protected against upper and lower respiratory tract infection and pulmonary disease induced by heterologous BRSV challenge. There was no evidence either of enhanced pulmonary pathology or of enhanced respiratory disease in vaccinated calves after BRSV challenge. These findings support the continued evaluation of the vectored RSV vaccines in man. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.
    Science translational medicine 08/2015; 7(300):300ra127. DOI:10.1126/scitranslmed.aac5757
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    ABSTRACT: Among the many unknowns in the translational path to developing drugs for acute stroke, addressing the reproducibility of preclinical data is only one piece of a multifaceted and incomplete puzzle (Llovera et al., this issue). Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.
    Science translational medicine 08/2015; 7(299):299fs32. DOI:10.1126/scitranslmed.aac9412
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    ABSTRACT: Sepsis is a leading cause of death in the United States, with mortality highest among patients who develop septic shock. Early aggressive treatment decreases morbidity and mortality. Although automated screening tools can detect patients currently experiencing severe sepsis and septic shock, none predict those at greatest risk of developing shock. We analyzed routinely available physiological and laboratory data from intensive care unit patients and developed "TREWScore," a targeted real-time early warning score that predicts which patients will develop septic shock. TREWScore identified patients before the onset of septic shock with an area under the ROC (receiver operating characteristic) curve (AUC) of 0.83 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.81 to 0.85]. At a specificity of 0.67, TREWScore achieved a sensitivity of 0.85 and identified patients a median of 28.2 [interquartile range (IQR), 10.6 to 94.2] hours before onset. Of those identified, two-thirds were identified before any sepsis-related organ dysfunction. In comparison, the Modified Early Warning Score, which has been used clinically for septic shock prediction, achieved a lower AUC of 0.73 (95% CI, 0.71 to 0.76). A routine screening protocol based on the presence of two of the systemic inflammatory response syndrome criteria, suspicion of infection, and either hypotension or hyperlactatemia achieved a lower sensitivity of 0.74 at a comparable specificity of 0.64. Continuous sampling of data from the electronic health records and calculation of TREWScore may allow clinicians to identify patients at risk for septic shock and provide earlier interventions that would prevent or mitigate the associated morbidity and mortality. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.
    Science translational medicine 08/2015; 7(299):299ra122. DOI:10.1126/scitranslmed.aab3719
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    ABSTRACT: Immunological and inflammatory processes downstream of dystrophin deficiency as well as metabolic abnormalities, defective autophagy, and loss of regenerative capacity all contribute to muscle pathology in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). These downstream cascades offer potential avenues for pharmacological intervention. Modulating the inflammatory response and inducing immunological tolerance to de novo dystrophin expression will be critical to the success of dystrophin-replacement therapies. This Review focuses on the role of the inflammatory response in DMD pathogenesis and opportunities for clinical intervention. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.
    Science translational medicine 08/2015; 7(299):299rv4. DOI:10.1126/scitranslmed.aaa7322
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    ABSTRACT: Permitting patients to pay for participation in clinical research threatens the principles of social value and fair subject selection as well as robust clinical trial design. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.
    Science translational medicine 07/2015; 7(298):298ps16. DOI:10.1126/scitranslmed.aac5204
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    ABSTRACT: Inflammation due to bacterial infection exacerbates hearing loss caused by aminoglycoside antibiotic treatment in a mouse model of sepsis (Koo et al.). Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.
    Science translational medicine 07/2015; 7(298):298fs31. DOI:10.1126/scitranslmed.aac9811