Project Management Journal

Publisher: John Wiley and Sons

Description

Impact factor 0.57

  • 5-year impact
    0.00
  • Cited half-life
    6.40
  • Immediacy index
    0.08
  • Eigenfactor
    0.00
  • Article influence
    0.00
  • Other titles
    Project management journal (Online), Project management journal
  • ISSN
    1938-9507
  • OCLC
    47853105
  • Material type
    Document, Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

John Wiley and Sons

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • See Wiley-Blackwell entry for articles after February 2007
    • On personal web site or secure external website at authors institution
    • Deposit in institutional repositories is not allowed
    • JASIST authors may deposit in an institutional repository
    • Non-commercial
    • Pre-print must be accompanied with set phrase (see individual journal copyright transfer agreements)
    • Published source must be acknowledged with set phrase (see individual journal copyright transfer agreements)
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Articles in some journals can be made Open Access on payment of additional charge
    • 'John Wiley and Sons' is an imprint of 'Wiley'
  • Classification
    ​ green

Publications in this journal

  • Project Management Journal 12/2014; 45(6).
  • Project Management Journal 12/2014; 45(6).
  • Project Management Journal 12/2014; 45(6).
  • Project Management Journal 12/2014; 45(6).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Project teams are central to organizations everywhere; however, there is a knowledge gap between project management scholars on the one hand and organizational behavior and industrial–organizational (OB/IO) scholars on the other. This gap seriously impedes the advancement of knowledge, because scholars from both fields have not leveraged each other's considerable knowledge and might be relying on outdated models and evidence to study project team phenomena, manage project teams, or develop university curricula. A call is made for interdisciplinary research projects devoted specifically to developing a research agenda on project teams.
    Project Management Journal 12/2014; 45(6).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: A fundamental assumption of project management practice and research is that using project management to achieve organizational objectives improves organizational performance. However, there is little published research that directly questions this assumption. This paper tests the hypothesis that using project management increases the productivity of small to medium enterprises, using data from two longitudinal surveys of Australian businesses with less than 200 staff members. These data were used to create models of the relationship between productivity and business skills using binary logistic regression. The models demonstrate that project management has a significant impact on small to medium enterprise productivity.
    Project Management Journal 12/2014; 45(6).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Isolated pockets of innovation can be found in projects—such as the novel solution used to redesign the Velodrome roof during the London 2012 Olympics—but there have been few, if any, systematic efforts to manage innovation in a megaproject. This paper presents the initial findings of an ongoing three-year (2012–2014) action research project between Crossrail and researchers at Imperial College London and University College London. Action research is well suited to a setting where an intervention is required to diagnose and solve an organizational problem and produce scientific findings (Miles & Huberman, 1994; Van de Ven, 2007). Undertaken in collaboration with practitioners, the aim of action research is to transform the research setting through a process of critical inquiry and action. Our engagement with Crossrail aimed to formulate and implement an innovation strategy to improve the performance and outcomes of the project. We identified four stages—or windows of opportunity—to intervene to generate, discover, and implement innovation in a megaproject: (1) the bridging window during the front-end when ideas, learning, and practices from other projects and industries can be used to create an innovative project process, organization, and governance structure; (2) the engaging window, when tendering and contractual processes can be used by the client to encourage contractors and suppliers to develop novel ideas and innovative solutions; (3) the leveraging window, when all the parties involved—clients, delivery partners, and suppliers—are mobilized to develop novel ideas, new technologies, and organizational practices to improve performance; and (4) the exchanging window at the back-end, when ideas and resources for innovation can be (re)combined with those of other projects in the wider innovation ecosystem to improve performance. The first two stages had largely occurred when we became involved in the Crossrail project in 2012. Our intervention addressed the final two stages, when we assisted in the development and implementation of an innovation strategy. Core to this strategy was a coordinated mobilization of the innovative capabilities across the project supply chain. Though, to be successful, this approach had to be open enough to span organizational boundaries beyond the supply chain, reaching into the broader ecosystem. The four windows provide a valuable new heuristic for organizing innovation in megaprojects, pointing to areas where project managers can craft targeted innovation interventions and compare their efforts with those of others.
    Project Management Journal 12/2014; 45(6).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Innovation portfolio management has been touted as a new dynamic capability following the evolution of team- and project-based organizational forms. In this article, we conceptualize innovative dynamic capabilities as a multidimensional construct that comprises distinct but related aspects in managing innovation. We test our model, which links this capability to innovative performance by using survey data from a sample of 923 firms. We find empirical support for our conceptualization and its impact on firm innovative performance.
    Project Management Journal 12/2014; 45(6).
  • Project Management Journal 12/2014; 45(6).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This study examines the relationships between corporate innovation culture (analysis/practices) and dimensions of project portfolio success (strategic fit/portfolio balance) as well as national-level culture practices as moderators. Data (N = 165) were collected in four countries differing in cultural practices. Analysis and practices were identified as positive, significant, and complementary predictors of both dimensions. As hypothesized, the corporate variables related more strongly and positively to the success dimensions when assertiveness was high rather than low. The findings, thus, suggest that corporate factors should be compatible with national culture to elevate the fit and balance of project portfolios.
    Project Management Journal 12/2014; 45(6).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This study aims to investigate the influence of coordination problems in glass and metal curtain wall (GMCW) installation on project productivity in Singapore. Trade-level coordination problems in GMCW installation were identified through literature review and included in a survey questionnaire. The survey results indicated that, on average, 66.5 days of rework and 52.5 days of waiting resulted from coordination problems, and that “last-minute changes in design by the client” led to the longest rework and waiting time. Additionally, the rework and waiting time caused by trade-level coordination problems were correlated with the total rework and waiting time.
    Project Management Journal 10/2014; 45(5).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We develop a framework to analyze the multi-level knowledge requirements of complex, major projects in terms of ambidexterity—the ability to exploit (refine existing knowledge) and explore (develop new knowledge). This is an important theme within the wider literature, yet practical operationalization methods for managers and researchers are not evident. We demonstrate the ambidexterity view through an illustrative case study of telecommunications delivery for the London 2012 Olympic Games and show how these concepts can be used to create an effective knowledge strategy. We offer a structure for the analysis of knowledge utilization in projects.
    Project Management Journal 10/2014; 45(5).
  • Project Management Journal 10/2014; 45(5).
  • Project Management Journal 10/2014; 45(5).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In stakeholder management, a key question is: How can an actor/organization (e.g., a project) under different contingencies apply strategies to develop the relationship with each stakeholder into a favorable one seen from the focal organization's perspective? Based on an in-depth longitudinal case study, we provide detailed descriptions of how a project management team worked with its stakeholder relationships. Applying a practice approach, we explore how stakeholder management practices emerged and evolved as embedded actions and interpretations related to perceptions of each stakeholder's harm and help potentials. We show how trust was both input to and outcomes of the managerial action.
    Project Management Journal 10/2014; 45(5).
  • Project Management Journal 10/2014; 45(5).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: It is necessary to reconsider the assumptions upon which the process of implementing compliance with ethical programs rests, in both theoretical and practical terms. These assumptions should hinge on organizational enablers that allow embeddedness of codes of ethics in the web of an organization's processes. This article sets out to describe an approach that will facilitate implementation of codes of ethics in construction organizations and a comprehensive literature survey approach is adopted to achieve this. The paper equally employs the application of the European Foundation for Quality Management (EFQM) model as a tool to stimulate ethical behavior in an organization, with the focus on the enabler criterion of the model. The authors discuss organizational enablers in relation to the implementation of ethical codes. The study demonstrates how ethics can be managed in an organization by proposing a framework to enhance codes of ethics embeddedness in the web of an organization. The paper indicates current research gaps and future opportunities for both academics and practitioners.
    Project Management Journal 10/2014; 45(5).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Projects are expected to bring value to their constituents. Value management in project portfolios has centered on the maximization of commercial value and identification of future business prospects. In this study, the goal is increased understanding of the identification and assessment of strategic, non-commercial value in project portfolios. We map the relevant dimensions of strategic value and supplement previous frameworks with the non-commercial aspects. Ecological, societal, and learning values have only been studied conceptually and qualitatively in earlier research. We propose future research on these values in quantitative settings and exploring collective sensemaking as part of project portfolio value management.
    Project Management Journal 10/2014; 45(5).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Project management and change management both contribute to the management and delivery of changes to organizations; however, they are based on distinct bodies of knowledge, and practitioners of these disciplines have disparate views on how change should be managed. There is a lack of consensus about how these disciplines should work together to deliver organizational change projects, which may result in conflict. This research delves into practitioners’ perspectives on formal authority, the reporting relationship between these disciplines, and also reveals the fundamental differences in how practitioners of these disciplines view the practice of organizational change.
    Project Management Journal 10/2014; 45(5).