Project Management Journal

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

Description

  • Impact factor
    0.57
  • 5-year impact
    0.00
  • Cited half-life
    6.40
  • Immediacy index
    0.08
  • Eigenfactor
    0.00
  • Article influence
    0.00
  • Other titles
    Project management journal (Online), Project management journal
  • ISSN
    1938-9507
  • OCLC
    47853105
  • Material type
    Document, Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

John Wiley & Sons

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • See Wiley-Blackwell entry for articles after February 2007
    • On personal web site or secure external website at authors institution
    • Not allowed on institutional repository
    • JASIST authors may deposit in an institutional repository
    • Non-commercial
    • Pre-print must be accompanied with set phrase (see individual journal copyright transfer agreements)
    • Published source must be acknowledged with set phrase (see individual journal copyright transfer agreements)
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Articles in some journals can be made Open Access on payment of additional charge
    • 'John Wiley and Sons' is an imprint of 'Wiley-Blackwell'
  • Classification
    ​ green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Projects are expected to bring value to their constituents. Value management in project portfolios has centered on the maximization of commercial value and identification of future business prospects. In this study, the goal is increased understanding of the identification and assessment of strategic, non-commercial value in project portfolios. We map the relevant dimensions of strategic value and supplement previous frameworks with the non-commercial aspects. Ecological, societal, and learning values have only been studied conceptually and qualitatively in earlier research. We propose future research on these values in quantitative settings and exploring collective sensemaking as part of project portfolio value management.
    Project Management Journal 10/2014; 45(5).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: It is necessary to reconsider the assumptions upon which the process of implementing compliance with ethical programs rests, in both theoretical and practical terms. These assumptions should hinge on organizational enablers that allow embeddedness of codes of ethics in the web of an organization's processes. This article sets out to describe an approach that will facilitate implementation of codes of ethics in construction organizations and a comprehensive literature survey approach is adopted to achieve this. The paper equally employs the application of the European Foundation for Quality Management (EFQM) model as a tool to stimulate ethical behavior in an organization, with the focus on the enabler criterion of the model. The authors discuss organizational enablers in relation to the implementation of ethical codes. The study demonstrates how ethics can be managed in an organization by proposing a framework to enhance codes of ethics embeddedness in the web of an organization. The paper indicates current research gaps and future opportunities for both academics and practitioners.
    Project Management Journal 10/2014; 45(5).
  • Article: Accelerate
    Project Management Journal 10/2014; 45(5).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Project management and change management both contribute to the management and delivery of changes to organizations; however, they are based on distinct bodies of knowledge, and practitioners of these disciplines have disparate views on how change should be managed. There is a lack of consensus about how these disciplines should work together to deliver organizational change projects, which may result in conflict. This research delves into practitioners’ perspectives on formal authority, the reporting relationship between these disciplines, and also reveals the fundamental differences in how practitioners of these disciplines view the practice of organizational change.
    Project Management Journal 10/2014; 45(5).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This study aims to investigate the influence of coordination problems in glass and metal curtain wall (GMCW) installation on project productivity in Singapore. Trade-level coordination problems in GMCW installation were identified through literature review and included in a survey questionnaire. The survey results indicated that, on average, 66.5 days of rework and 52.5 days of waiting resulted from coordination problems, and that “last-minute changes in design by the client” led to the longest rework and waiting time. Additionally, the rework and waiting time caused by trade-level coordination problems were correlated with the total rework and waiting time.
    Project Management Journal 10/2014; 45(5).
  • Project Management Journal 10/2014; 45(5).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In stakeholder management, a key question is: How can an actor/organization (e.g., a project) under different contingencies apply strategies to develop the relationship with each stakeholder into a favorable one seen from the focal organization's perspective? Based on an in-depth longitudinal case study, we provide detailed descriptions of how a project management team worked with its stakeholder relationships. Applying a practice approach, we explore how stakeholder management practices emerged and evolved as embedded actions and interpretations related to perceptions of each stakeholder's harm and help potentials. We show how trust was both input to and outcomes of the managerial action.
    Project Management Journal 10/2014; 45(5).
  • Project Management Journal 10/2014; 45(5).
  • Project Management Journal 10/2014; 45(5).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We develop a framework to analyze the multi-level knowledge requirements of complex, major projects in terms of ambidexterity—the ability to exploit (refine existing knowledge) and explore (develop new knowledge). This is an important theme within the wider literature, yet practical operationalization methods for managers and researchers are not evident. We demonstrate the ambidexterity view through an illustrative case study of telecommunications delivery for the London 2012 Olympic Games and show how these concepts can be used to create an effective knowledge strategy. We offer a structure for the analysis of knowledge utilization in projects.
    Project Management Journal 10/2014; 45(5).
  • Project Management Journal 08/2014; 45(4).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This paper describes the quantitative analysis phase of an exploratory study to identify useful project management improvement initiatives and factors contributing to their successful embedment in organizations. A preliminary framework, based on a literature review and a series of interviews with practitioners, was tested via a questionnaire, which elicited 793 responses from project management practitioners worldwide. The paper focuses on factor analyses of the questionnaire responses, addressing issues of construct validity and reliability. The resulting final framework highlights 15 key project management improvement initiatives and 26 embedding factors grouped by the factor analyses into three project management improvement initiative themes and six embedding themes.
    Project Management Journal 08/2014; 45(4).
  • Project Management Journal 08/2014; 45(4).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Whereas exploration projects stand as important drivers in renewing the assets of the firm and creating new business opportunities, it is well recognized that project evaluation and value management methodologies are likely to kill them. This paper provides elements to solving this paradox. We rely on a longitudinal study of three exploration projects and the projects conducted afterward in the automotive and space industries. The analysis suggests that the value creation process can be regarded and managed as a dual process of potential value creation and value realization. This paper discusses the linkages with existing practices and theories.
    Project Management Journal 08/2014; 45(4).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This research presents the findings from an experiment that investigated to what extent decision makers suffer from optimism bias when escalating a commitment to failing projects; 345 individuals, involved in project decision making, participated in the experiment. A new form of optimism bias, namely post-project optimism bias, is defined. Post-project optimism bias is an overly optimistic belief that a project will deliver better business benefits than what was planned or that can be proven. It is further confirmed that both post-project and in-project optimism biases have significant effects on the escalation of commitment to failing projects.
    Project Management Journal 08/2014; 45(4).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Previous research suggests complexity may be a significant factor in a project's failure to achieve cost, time, and quality objectives. In this paper, we examine the project complexity literature to develop a simple framework consisting of structural and dynamic complexity. We use this to compare the complexity of two successful construction megaprojects—Heathrow Terminal 5 and the London 2012 Olympic Park—to consider how the complexity in the two projects was managed. Our analysis reveals differences in the approach to managing structural and dynamic complexity, but identifies common factors that may help project managers achieve positive outcomes for their complex projects.
    Project Management Journal 08/2014; 45(4).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We investigate the influence of governance structures of temporary organizations on the ethical issues faced by its managers, how they respond to these issues, and how that influences trust among stakeholders. A global, web-based survey confirmed earlier research that project managers encounter transparency, optimization, and relationship issues, and identified four additional ethical issue types. Managers’ behavior in responding to ethical issues varies by governance structure, their willingness to resolve ethical issues themselves, and the trust between stakeholders. Higher levels of trust are found in stakeholder-oriented governance, which can reduce transaction costs. Implications for practitioners and academics are discussed.
    Project Management Journal 08/2014; 45(4).
  • Project Management Journal 08/2014; 45(4).

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