Food Analytical Methods (FOOD ANAL METHOD )

Publisher: Springer Verlag

Description

  • Impact factor
    1.97
    Show impact factor history
     
    Impact factor
  • 5-year impact
    2.07
  • Cited half-life
    2.30
  • Immediacy index
    0.24
  • Eigenfactor
    0.00
  • Article influence
    0.45
  • Other titles
    SpringerLink
  • ISSN
    1936-9751
  • OCLC
    288980005
  • Material type
    Document, Periodical
  • Document type
    Journal / Magazine / Newspaper, Computer File

Publisher details

Springer Verlag

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  • Classification
    ​ green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Abietic acid (AA) and dehydroabietic acid (DHAA) are major components of rosin, and both of them are well-recognized causes of skin allergy. Rosin was once widely used for removal of duck feathers in China. In the present study, an analytical method was developed for simultaneous determination of AA and DHAA in duck meats. AA and DHAA were extracted with acetonitrile and cleaned by solid-phase extraction, followed by chromatographic separation on C18 column with methanol/2 mM phosphoric acid (86/14, v/v) as mobile phase. AA was detected by photodiode array detection (PAD) at 240 nm, while DHAA was detected by fluorescence detection (FLD) with excitation and emission at 225 and 287 nm, respectively. Limits of quantification for AA and DHAA were 50 and 15 μg/kg, respectively. The method was applied to analysis of AA and DHAA residues in meats of rosin-defeathered ducks and commercial ducks. The results indicated that removal of duck feathers by means of rosin could lead to residues of AA and DHAA in duck skins, and 5 out of 32 commercial ducks were found to be contaminated by AA and DHAA, ranging from 1,556.1 to 9,638.7 μg/kg and 476.4 to 2,623.8 μg/kg, respectively. The proposed method could be used to identify those rosin-defeathered ducks and to monitor the illegal use of rosin in duck processing.
    Food Analytical Methods 09/2014; 7(8).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Total intact glucosinolate content in broccoli leaf extracts (Ramoso calabrese cultivar) has been determined by liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry with the aim of detecting potential differences in this value due to the effects of the drying temperature or the working and storage conditions (temperature and light exposure). Those broccoli leaf extracts were obtained with two different sample treatments based on heating the sample (microwave or oven), and using boiling water as extraction solvent. Significant differences were observed in the total intact glucosinolate content depending on the drying temperature and light exposure under typical working conditions. Meanwhile, those differences were less remarkable when the extracts were stored at low temperature and protected from light exposure.
    Food Analytical Methods 09/2014; 7(8).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: A modified QuEChERS (quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged, and safe) method for the simultaneous determination of 70 pesticides in tea was developed using gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Prior to acetonitrile extraction of the target compounds from tea matrix, samples were soaked in distilled water to improve the extraction efficiency. A mixture of adsorbents containing primary–secondary amine, octadecylsilane, graphite carbon black, and multiwalled carbon nanotubes was applied for the cleanup. Additional steps of concentration and solvent exchange were performed to reduce the amount of co-extracts and to decrease the limit of detection of the method. For all pesticides, good linear calibrations with coefficients (R 2) ≥0.99 were obtained at the concentration levels of 10, or 50 to 1,000 μg ml−1. The limits of quantifications (LOQs) were 5–25 μg ml−1, respectively. The recovery rates of samples spiked with 20, 100, and 200 μg kg−1 of analytes ranged from 71 % to 105 %. In addition, the relative standard deviations were lower than 20 %. A total of 331 tea samples were analyzed using this method, and the levels of five pesticide residues in nine tea samples exceeded the strictest maximum residual limits (MRLs).
    Food Analytical Methods 09/2014; 7(8).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Based on the enhancing effect of Cd2+ on luminol–Co2+ chemiluminescence (CL) system, a sensitive method for determining picogram Cd2+ in rice by flow injection (FI)–CL was proposed. It was found that the CL intensity increments were proportional to the concentrations of Cd2+, giving a calibration graph linear over the Cd2+ concentrations ranging from 7.0 to 5,000.0 pmol L−1, with a detection limit of 2.0 pmol L−1 (3σ) and relative standard deviations (RSDs) of 3.2, 2.8, and 2.5 % for 30.0, 300.0, and 1,000.0 pmol L−1 Cd2+ (n = 5), respectively. At a flow rate of 2.0 mL min−1, a complete determination of Cd2+ including sampling and washing could be accomplished within 36 s, giving a sample throughput of 100 h−1. The contents of Cd2+ in rice were found to be 0.07–0.10 mg kg−1. The proposed method was also applied to the determination of Cd2+ in spiked human serum samples with recoveries from 95.9 to 106.3 % and RSDs less than 4.0 %.
    Food Analytical Methods 09/2014; 7(8).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry method to determine five thyreostats in cow’s milk has been developed and validated according to 2002/657/EC criteria. Thyreostats were extracted with methanol from the milk after the precipitation of the protein. Then, the derivatisation of analytes with 3-iodobenzylbromide was performed and derivatives were analysed on a Poroshell C18 column with triple quadrupole MS detection. For all compounds, good recoveries were obtained; the decision limit CCα and the detection capability CCβ of five thyreostats do not exceed 2.2 and 3.8 μg L−1, respectively. Thirty-four samples of milk were tested for the presence of thyreostats; in 13, thiouracil was found above the decision limit. The highest concentration in raw milk reached a value of 4.2 μg L−1. To the authors’ knowledge, this study is the first to report the presence of naturally occurring thiouracil in cow’s milk.
    Food Analytical Methods 09/2014; 7(8).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Artichoke, borututu, and milk thistle are three medicinal plants widely consumed as infusions or included in dietary supplements (e.g., pills and syrups). Despite the high consumption of these plants, studies on their nutritional value and primary metabolites are scarce, with their composition in secondary metabolites such as phenolic compounds being only reported. Therefore, their nutritional value was assessed, and analytical tools (liquid and gas chromatography coupled to different detectors) were used to distinguish their chemical profiles according to their hydrophilic (sugars and organic acids) and lipophilic (fatty acids and tocopherols) components. Chromatographic techniques are important analytical tools used in the identification and quantification of several molecules, also being a standard requirement to distinguish different profiles. Borututu gave the highest energetic value with the highest content of carbohydrates and fat, sucrose and total sugars, shikimic and citric acids, and α-, β-, δ-, and total tocopherols. Artichoke had the highest ash and protein contents, oxalic acid, SFA (mainly palmitic acid), and γ-tocopherol, and also the best n-6/n-3 ratio. Milk thistle showed the highest levels of fructose and glucose, quinic acid and total organic acids, and PUFA, mainly linoleic acid, and the best PUFA/SFA ratio. The hydrophilic compounds identified in the studied plants, mostly sugars, are responsible for the energy contribution of their widely consumed infusions. Otherwise, the bioactivity of lipophilic compounds, namely, unsaturated fatty acids and tocopherols, is lost in those preparations but can be recovered in dietary supplements based on the plants. As far as we know, this is the first report on the detailed composition of the three plants regarding their nutritional features.
    Food Analytical Methods 09/2014; 7(8).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This paper describes, a new, sensitive, and low cost solid-phase extraction method using poly(N-phenylethanolamine) /multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) nanocomposite for extraction, pre-concentration, and flame atomic absorption spectrometric determination of lead in food and water samples at trace levels. The poly(N-phenylethanolamine)/MWCNTs nanocomposite were characterized by FT-IR spectroscopy, thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA), BET surface area (SBET) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Factors affecting the preconcentration of lead such as the pH of samples, flow rates, type and volume of eluent, and the effect of interfering ions and break through volume on the separation and determination of lead ions were investigated. The optimum conditions for the adsorption step were 5.0 and 18 mL min-1 for pH and sample flow rate, respectively, and for desorption step the optimal condition were 1.5 mL, 1 mol L-1 HCl, and 2 mL min-1, for volume of eluent, concentration of eluent, and eluent flow rate, respectively. The maximum sorbent capacity of the poly (N-phenylethanolamine)/MWCNTs nanocomposite was calculated to be 152.1 mg g-1. The preconcentration factor, relative standard deviation, and limit of detection of the method were found to be 100, 3.1% (10.0 µg L-1, n=5), and 0.8 µg L-1, respectively. The presented method was validated by certified reference material (NIST SRM 1515 Apple leaves and IAEA-336 Lichen), and finally applied to analysis of lead ions in food (Citrus limetta, Kiwi, Pomegranate and Fish samples) and water samples. The obtained data for analysis of lead ions in food samples were in the concentration range of 4.1-50.8 µg kg-1.
    Food Analytical Methods 08/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Despite the important role of total soluble phenolic compounds (TSPC) in plants and human health, a large number of studies that have evaluated the TSPC in food matrices did not consider possible interfering compounds such as soluble sugars, ascorbic acid (AA) and other reducing compounds in the Folin-Ciocalteu (F-C) quantification method. Thus, the present study describes steps for the optimization of a methodology to extract the TSPC using banana leaves as an example. In addition, the method was tested using ascorbate oxidase (AOX) as a tool to determine and emphasize the importance of the evaluation of AA interference in food products using orange juice as example. The results showed that two extraction cycles with 80% acetone and a posterior hexane extraction cycle to remove the excess of chlorophylls were able to obtain a good TSPC extraction yield from banana leaves without extracting compounds that may interfere with the F-C method. The methodology has proven to be accurate, precise, simple, rapid and inexpensive. Additionally, an overestimation of the TSPC levels in AA-rich matrices was proven using orange juice as example. Finally, it was demonstrated that the use of AOX could be a useful and simple tool to verify and reduce the AA interference. This work proves and emphasizes the importance of evaluating the yield of the extraction and interferences in the quantification of the TSPC in vegetal-derived foods, which are complex matrices that should be cautiously evaluated.
    Food Analytical Methods 08/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: A stable, effective, sensitive and selective method for simultaneous determination of 11 aldehydes in foodstuffs using a novel fluorescence-labeling reagent 2-(12-benzo[b]acridin-5-(12H)-yl)-acetohydrazide (BAAH) has been developed by HPLC with fluorescence detection and mass spectrometric identification. Response surface methodology was employed to optimize the derivatization reaction between BAAH and aldehydes. The completed separation of the 11 aldehydes was achieved in as little as 18 min on a reversed-phase Hypersil BDS C8 column with aqueous acetonitrile as mobile phase in conjunction with a binary gradient elution. Excellent linear coefficients were found to be of >0.9994. This method also showed excellent reproducibility and offered the low detection limits of 0.21–0.58 nM (at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3). The developed method was successfully applied to analyze aldehydes in various foodstuffs and exhibited satisfactory applicability.
    Food Analytical Methods 08/2014; 7(7).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Two cyanogenic glycosides (linustatin and neolinustatin) and sucrose were isolated from defatted flaxseed, and their structures were determined by NMR spectral analysis and comparison with existing data. Using secoisolariciresinol diglucoside (SDG) and the cyanogenic glycosides as standards, we developed a method to quantify the three compounds simultaneously by ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC)-MS in selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mode. Using this tool, flaxseed powder—processed by various methods—was analyzed with regard to the contents of the beneficial compound, SDG, and the toxic compounds, cyanogenic glycosides. The levels of SDG in samples treated with alkaline solution are much higher than in samples without treatment, and in general, the levels of linustatin and neolinustatin in flaxseed powder decreased progressively as heating time is prolonged after treatment with alkaline solutions.
    Food Analytical Methods 08/2014; 7(7).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Acting as a fluorescence sensing material, the molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) appended onto quantum dots (QDs) was constructed through anchoring the MIP layer on CdSe/ZnS QDs by simple embedding for highly selective and sensitive optosensing of tocopherol (TP) in rice. The resulting composite of QDs with MIP showed higher template selectivity versus that of non-imprinted polymer (NIP). Under optimal conditions, the relative fluorescence intensity of MIP appended onto QDs decreased linearly (r 2 > 0.99) with the increasing TP in the concentration in the range of 1.16 × 10−7–1.74 × 10−3 mol L−1 with a detection limit of 5.80 × 10−8 mol L−1, and the precision for five replicate detections of 1.0 × 10−4 mol L−1 TP was 2.17 % (relative standard deviation). Recoveries of 90.40 to 100.20 % were achieved by direct detection when MIP appended onto QDs was used for the selective separation of TP in rice samples.
    Food Analytical Methods 08/2014; 7(7).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: A simple and sensitive method was developed for the determination of four sulfonylurea herbicides (metsulfuron-methyl, chlorsulfuron, chlorotoluron, and bensulfuron-methyl) using matrix solid-phase dispersion (MSPD) extraction followed by high-performance liquid chromatography. The experimental conditions for the MSPD extraction, such as type and amount of dispersant, the ratio of dispersant to sample, type and volume of washing and elution solvent were evaluated and optimized. Under the optimal conditions, the calibration curves for the sulfonylurea herbicides had good linear relationships (r > 0.997) in the concentration range of 0.2–10 μg g−1, and the limits of detection were in the range of 0.02–0.07 μg g−1. The recoveries of the sulfonylurea herbicides at two fortification levels were between 62.0 and 102.6 % with the relative standard deviations less than 6.92 %. The methodology was successfully applied to the analysis of four sulfonylurea herbicides in food crops.
    Food Analytical Methods 08/2014; 7(7).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: A gas chromatography–mass spectrometry method was optimized for quantification of 4-methylimidazole [4-MEI] in balsamic vinegars and processed sauces. The method used ion-pair extraction with bis-2-ethylhexylphosphate and derivatization with isobutylchloroformate, followed by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC–MS) quantification using 2-ethylimidazole as internal standard. Performance characteristics such as linearity, recovery, and repeatability were good in a broad range of concentrations, and the limit of detection was low enough (130 ug/kg) to detect the presence of small quantities of the compound. A total of 35 samples were analyzed, including balsamic vinegars and processed sauces containing caramel in the ingredients list (soy, Worcestershire, Tonkatsu, Marinara, and Oyster sauces). The presence of 4-MEI was consistent with the presence of ammonia caramel (E150 c and d) in the ingredients list, with average values of 2431 ug/kg for balsamic vinegars and 804 ug/kg for processed sauces. These 4-MEI amounts are almost tenfold higher than those described for caramels containing beverages, which support the necessity to take an effective control on these products.
    Food Analytical Methods 08/2014; 7(7).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The potential of a gas chromatography (GC)-based electronic nose (E-nose) combined with chemometrics to classify Chinese rice wine by wine age was investigated. Olfactive fingerprints of 1-, 3-, and 5-year Chinese rice wine samples collected by the E-nose were analyzed by principal component analysis (PCA) and discriminant analysis (DA). Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) was used for wine age validation purpose. The results indicated that the percentage of samples correctly classified by the E-nose was 96.88 %. It was concluded that the GC-based E-nose together with DA was a reliable method for wine age discrimination.
    Food Analytical Methods 08/2014; 7(7).

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