Journal of Neurosurgery

Publisher: American Association of Neurological Surgeons

Description

  • Impact factor
    3.15
  • 5-year impact
    3.13
  • Cited half-life
    0.00
  • Immediacy index
    0.75
  • Eigenfactor
    0.03
  • Article influence
    0.96
  • Other titles
    Journal of neurosurgery (Online), Journal of neurosurgery, JNS
  • ISSN
    1933-0693
  • OCLC
    44743688
  • Material type
    Document, Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Object Temozolomide (TMZ) may enhance antitumor immunity in patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). In this paper the authors report on a prospective Phase I/IIa clinical trial of fractionated radiotherapy (FRT) concomitant with TMZ therapy, followed by treatment with autologous formalin-fixed tumor vaccine (AFTV) and TMZ maintenance in patients with newly diagnosed GBM. Methods Twenty-four patients (age 16-75 years, Karnofsky Performance Scale score ≥ 60% before initiation of FRT) with newly diagnosed GBM received a total dose of 60 Gy of FRT with daily concurrent TMZ. After a 4-week interval, the patients received 3 AFTV injections and the first course of TMZ maintenance chemotherapy for 5 days, followed by multiple courses of TMZ for 5 days in each 28-day cycle. Results This treatment regimen was well tolerated by all patients. The percentage of patients with progression-free survival (PFS) ≥ 24 months was 33%. The median PFS, median overall survival (OS), and the actuarial 2- and 3-year survival rates of the 24 patients were 8.2 months, 22.2 months, 47%, and 38%, respectively. The median PFS in patients with a delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) response after the third AFTV injection (DTH-2) of 10 mm or larger surpassed the median length of follow-up for progression-free patients (29.5 months), which was significantly greater than the median PFS in patients with a smaller DTH-2 response. Conclusions The treatment regimen was well tolerated and resulted in favorable PFS and OS for newly diagnosed GBM patients. Clinical trial registration no.: UMIN000001426 (UMIN clinical trials registry, Japan).
    Journal of Neurosurgery 07/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Object The object of this paper was to describe the surgical anatomy and technical nuances of the endonasal transcavernous posterior clinoidectomy approach with interdural pituitary transposition and to report the clinical outcome of this technical modification. Methods The surgical anatomy of the proposed approach was studied in 10 colored silicon-injected anatomical specimens. The medical records of 12 patients that underwent removal of the posterior clinoid(s) with this technique were reviewed. Results The natural anatomical corridor provided by the cavernous sinus is used to get access to the posterior clinoid by mobilizing the pituitary gland in an interdural fashion. The medial wall of the cavernous sinus is preserved intact and attached to the gland during its medial and superior mobilization. This provides protection to the gland, allowing for preservation of its venous drainage pathways. The inferior hypophyseal artery is transected to facilitate the manipulation of the medial wall of the cavernous sinus and pituitary gland. This approach was successfully performed in all patients, including 6 with chordomas, 5 with petroclival meningiomas, and 1 with an epidermoid tumor. No patient in this series had neurovascular injury related to the posterior clinoidectomy. There were no instances of permanent hypopituitarism or diabetes insipidus. Conclusions The authors introduce a surgical variant of the endoscopic endonasal posterior clinoidectomy approach that does not require intradural pituitary transposition and is more effective than the purely extradural approach. The endoscopic endonasal transcavernous approach facilitates the removal of prominent posterior clinoids increasing the working space at the lateral recess of the interpeduncular cistern, while preserving the pituitary function.
    Journal of Neurosurgery 05/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Object Jugular foramen tumors often extend intra- and extracranially. The gross-total removal of tumors located both intracranially and intraforaminally is technically challenging and often requires a combined skull base approach. This study presents a suprajugular extension of the retrosigmoid approach directed through the osseous roof of the jugular foramen that allows the removal of tumors located in the cerebellopontine angle with extension into the upper part of the foramen, with demonstration of an illustrative case. Methods The cerebellopontine angles and jugular foramina were examined in dry skulls and cadaveric heads to clarify the microsurgical anatomy around the jugular foramen and to define the steps of the suprajugular exposure. Results The area drilled in the suprajugular approach is inferior to the acoustic meatus, medial to the endolymphatic depression and surrounding the superior half of the glossopharyngeal dural fold. Opening this area exposed the upper part of the jugular foramen and extended the exposure along the glossopharyngeal nerve below the roof of the jugular foramen. In the illustrative case, a schwannoma originating from the glossopharyngeal nerve in the cerebellopontine angle and extending below the roof of the jugular foramen and above the jugular bulb was totally removed without any postoperative complications. Conclusions The suprajugular extension of the retrosigmoid approach will permit removal of tumors located predominantly in the cerebellopontine angle but also extending into the upper part of the jugular foramen without any additional skull base approaches.
    Journal of Neurosurgery 05/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Object The incidence of chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is expected to increase substantially over the next 25 years. Continuing refinement of techniques for surgical evacuation is essential for optimizing patient outcomes. A novel technique involving a hollow screw, which is threaded through a twist-drill hole in the cranium and then connected to a closed drainage system, has been increasing in popularity. The aim of this systematic review is to collate and analyze the published experience with this novel technique and to evaluate its efficacy in comparison with the other surgical treatment methods. Methods This systematic review was conducted according to the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) guidelines and has been registered with the PROSPERO International Prospective Register of Systematic Reviews (registration number CRD42013003544). MEDLINE, Web of Knowledge, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews were searched for published series involving more than 10 patients treated with these new techniques. Results Nine eligible studies were found (6 case series and 3 case-control studies) comprising 796 patients treated with these new techniques. Pooled analysis showed a "success rate" of 77.6% (95% CI 74.6%-80.4%), recurrence rate of 22.4%, and in-hospital mortality of 1.4%. Conclusions This systematic review adds further evidence to the pool of data assessing the safety and efficacy of the use of this novel, minimally invasive technique for the treatment for CSDH. Overall, twist-drill craniostomy with hollow screws appears to be safe and effective. Class I evidence is necessary to optimize the surgical management of patients with CSDH.
    Journal of Neurosurgery 05/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Object Resected brain metastases have a high rate of local recurrence without adjuvant therapy. Adjuvant whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) remains the standard of care with a local control rate > 90%. However, WBRT is delivered over 10-15 days, which can delay other therapy and is associated with acute and long-term toxicities. Permanent cesium-131 ((131)Cs) implants can be used at the time of metastatic resection, thereby avoiding the need for any additional therapy. The authors evaluated the safety, feasibility, and efficacy of a novel therapeutic approach with permanent (131)Cs brachytherapy at the resection for brain metastases. Methods After institutional review board approval was obtained, 24 patients with a newly diagnosed metastasis to the brain were accrued to a prospective protocol between 2010 and 2012. There were 10 frontal, 7 parietal, 4 cerebellar, 2 occipital, and 1 temporal metastases. Histology included lung cancer (16), breast cancer (2), kidney cancer (2), melanoma (2), colon cancer (1), and cervical cancer (1). Stranded (131)Cs seeds were placed as permanent volume implants. The prescription dose was 80 Gy at a 5-mm depth from the resection cavity surface. Distant metastases were treated with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) or WBRT, depending on the number of lesions. The primary end point was local (resection cavity) freedom from progression (FFP). Secondary end points included regional FFP, distant FFP, median survival, overall survival (OS), and toxicity. Results The median follow-up was 19.3 months (range 12.89-29.57 months). The median age was 65 years (range 45-84 years). The median size of resected tumor was 2.7 cm (range 1.5-5.5 cm), and the median volume of resected tumor was 10.31 cm(3) (range 1.77-87.11 cm(3)). The median number of seeds used was 12 (range 4-35), with a median activity of 3.82 mCi per seed (range 3.31-4.83 mCi) and total activity of 46.91 mCi (range 15.31-130.70 mCi). Local FFP was 100%. There was 1 adjacent leptomeningeal recurrence, resulting in a 1-year regional FFP of 93.8% (95% CI 63.2%-99.1%). One-year distant FFP was 48.4% (95% CI 26.3%-67.4%). Median OS was 9.9 months (95% CI 4.8 months, upper limit not estimated) and 1-year OS was 50.0% (95% CI 29.1%-67.8%). Complications included CSF leak (1), seizure (1), and infection (1). There was no radiation necrosis. Conclusions The use of postresection permanent (131)Cs brachytherapy implants resulted in no local recurrences and no radiation necrosis. This treatment was safe, well tolerated, and convenient for patients, resulting in a short radiation treatment course, high response rate, and minimal toxicity. These findings merit further study with a multicenter trial.
    Journal of Neurosurgery 05/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Object While the use of endoscopic approaches has become increasingly accepted in the resection of pituitary adenomas, limited evidence exists regarding the success of this technique for patients with large and giant pituitary adenomas. This study reviews the outcomes of a large cohort of patients with large and giant pituitary adenomas who underwent endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal surgery at the authors' institution and focuses on identifying factors that can predict extent of resection and hence aid in developing guidelines and indications for the use of endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal surgery versus open craniotomy approaches to large and giant pituitary adenomas. Methods The authors reviewed 487 patients who underwent endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal resection of sellar masses. From this group, 73 consecutive patients with large and giant pituitary adenomas (defined as maximum diameter ≥ 3 cm and tumor volume ≥ 10 cm(3)) who underwent endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal surgery between January 1, 2006, and June 6, 2012, were included in the study. Clinical presentation, radiological studies, laboratory investigations, tumor pathology data, clinical outcomes, extent of resection measured by volumetric analysis, and complications were analyzed. Results The mean preoperative tumor diameter in this series was 4.1 cm and the volume was 18 cm(3). The average resection rate was 82.9%, corresponding with a mean residual volume of 3 cm(3). Gross-total resection was achieved in 16 patients (24%), near-total in 11 (17%), subtotal in 24 (36%), and partial in 15 (23%). Seventy-three percent of patients experienced improvement in visual acuity, while 24% were unchanged. Visual fields were improved in 61.8% and unchanged in 5.5%. Overall, 27 patients (37%) experienced a total of 32 complications. The most common complications were sinusitis (14%) and CSF leak (10%). Six patients underwent subsequent radiation therapy because of aggressive tumor histopathology. No deaths occurred in this cohort of patients. Statistically significant predictors of extent of resection included highest Knosp grade (p = 0.001), preoperative tumor volume (p = 0.025), preoperative maximum tumor diameter (p = 0.002), hemorrhagic component (p = 0.027), posterior extension (p = 0.001), and sphenoid sinus invasion (p = 0.005). Conclusions Endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal surgery is an effective treatment method for patients with large and giant pituitary adenomas, which results in high (> 80%) rates of resection and improvement in visual function. It is not associated with high rates of major complications and is safe when performed by experienced surgeons. The preoperative Knosp grade, tumor volume, tumor diameter, hemorrhagic components on MRI, posterior extension, and sphenoid sinus invasion may allow a prediction of extent of resection and in these patients a staged operation may be required to maximize extent of resection.
    Journal of Neurosurgery 05/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Object The aim of this study was to describe the similarity of configuration between the arachnoid complex in the posterior half of the incisural space and the Liliequist membrane. Methods Microsurgical dissection and anatomical observation were performed in 20 formalin-fixed adult cadaver heads. The origin, distribution, and configuration of the arachnoid membranes and their relationships with the vascular structures in the posterior half of the incisural space were examined. Results The posterior perimesencephalic membrane and the cerebellar precentral membrane have a common origin at the tentorial edge and form an arachnoid complex strikingly resembling an inverted Liliequist membrane. Asymmetry between sides is not uncommon. If the cerebellar precentral membrane is hypoplastic on one side or both, the well-developed quadrigeminal membrane plays a prominent part in partitioning the subarachnoid space in the posterior half of the incisural space. Conclusions The arachnoid complex in the posterior half of the incisural space can be regarded as an inverted Liliequist membrane. This concept can help neurosurgeons to gain better understanding of the surgical anatomy at the level of the tentorial incisura.
    Journal of Neurosurgery 05/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Object Cerebral cavernous malformations have been studied widely, but the natural history of brainstem cavernous malformations (CMs) is not well defined, and hemorrhages caused by brainstem CMs are devastating. The goal of this study was to quantify the hemorrhage risks and functional outcomes of patients with brainstem CMs. Methods This prospective, longitudinal, cohort study included patients with brainstem CMs diagnosed between 1985 and 2012. The clinical courses of all patients were recorded. Predictors of hemorrhage and the overall untreated outcomes were evaluated. Results A total of 331 patients (46.5% female) were included, with a mean follow-up duration of 6.5 years. The annual hemorrhage rates in patients initially presenting with hemorrhage with (n = 215) or without (n = 34) focal neurological deficits were 15.9% and 12.4%, respectively. However, the annual hemorrhage rate was 8.7% in patients initially presenting without hemorrhage (n = 82). The risk factors for hemorrhage were female sex (hazard ratio [HR] 1.445, p = 0.041), prior hemorrhage (HR 1.277, p = 0.029), and perilesional edema (HR 1.830, p = 0.002). Overall, neurological function at the most recent assessment was improved compared with neurological function at diagnosis. Additionally, 307 patients (92.7%) improved or stabilized, 268 (81.0%) lived independently, and 95 (28.7%) completely recovered. Predictors favoring complete recovery were no prospective hemorrhage (HR 1.958, p = 0.001), younger age (HR 1.268, p = 0.001), and small lesion size (HR 1.578, p = 0.004). Conclusions Patients' initial presentation predicts their prospective annual hemorrhage rate. This study suggests that several strong risk factors for hemorrhage and predictors of brainstem CM outcomes may enable clinicians to evaluate the potential hemorrhage risks of their patients and design personalized treatments.
    Journal of Neurosurgery 05/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Object Despite their benign histological appearance, craniopharyngiomas can be considered a challenge for the neurosurgeon and a possible source of poor prognosis for the patient. With the widespread use of the endoscope in endonasal surgery, this route has been proposed over the past decade as an alternative technique for the removal of craniopharyngiomas. Methods The authors retrospectively analyzed data from a series of 103 patients who underwent the endoscopic endonasal approach at two institutions (Division of Neurosurgery of the Università degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, Naples, Italy, and Division of Neurosurgery of the Bellaria Hospital, Bologna, Italy), between January 1997 and December 2012, for the removal of infra- and/or supradiaphragmatic craniopharyngiomas. Twenty-nine patients (28.2%) had previously been surgically treated. Results The authors achieved overall gross-total removal in 68.9% of the cases: 78.9% in purely infradiaphragmatic lesions and 66.3% in lesions involving the supradiaphragmatic space. Among lesions previously treated surgically, the gross-total removal rate was 62.1%. The overall improvement rate in visual disturbances was 74.7%, whereas worsening occurred in 2.5%. No new postoperative defect was noted. Worsening of the anterior pituitary function was reported in 46.2% of patients overall, and there were 38 new cases (48.1% of 79) of postoperative diabetes insipidus. The most common complication was postoperative CSF leakage; the overall rate was 14.6%, and it diminished to 4% in the last 25 procedures, thanks to improvement in reconstruction techniques. The mortality rate was 1.9%, with a mean follow-up duration of 48 months (range 3-246 months). Conclusions The endoscopic endonasal approach has become a valid surgical technique for the management of craniopharyngiomas. It provides an excellent corridor to infra- and supradiaphragmatic midline craniopharyngiomas, including the management of lesions extending into the third ventricle chamber. Even though indications for this approach are rigorously lesion based, the data in this study confirm its effectiveness in a large patient series.
    Journal of Neurosurgery 05/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Low-grade fibromyxoid sarcoma (LGFMS) is a rare soft-tissue neoplasm with metastatic potential and needs to be recognized as such, because it can be mistaken for other types of sarcoma due to its unremarkable appearance. This 49-year-old man presented with an approximately 5-cm mass on the anteromedial aspect of his left thigh that slowly increased over 10 years. Clinical symptoms were limited to local discomfort and intermittent distal numbness. Due to the location, imaging findings, and lack of serious symptoms, the initial differential diagnosis favored a schwannoma. An initial biopsy revealed histopathological findings consistent with a perineurioma, although with atypical features. The patient elected to have the mass excised, and the tumor, which arose from a branch of the saphenous nerve, could be separated well from the surrounding soft tissue. Histopathological investigation of the mass displayed characteristic features of a fibromyxoid sarcoma, which was confirmed by subsequent fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis. Due to concerns about infiltration beyond the margins, radical reexcision was advocated and performed, resulting in definite clear surgical margins. At follow-up, the patient had regained full strength with no residual neurological symptoms or any new deficits. He has since been healthy and disease free for a total of 4 years in follow-up. This case documents, to the authors' knowledge, the first observation of an LGFMS associated with a peripheral nerve. It also supports the use of fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis as an essential diagnostic method in establishing the diagnosis of LGFMS.
    Journal of Neurosurgery 04/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: The authors have developed a novel device, which they have named Mari, that allows hands-free utilization of the surgical microscope. The device is attached to the eyepieces of a multifunction counterweight-balanced surgical microscope and consists of a metallic holder with supportive plates that facilitate interaction between the device and surgeon's head. On the holder are installed 1) an electric switch, which allows the surgeon to release the microscope's magnetic clutches, allowing movement of the microscope along the x, y, and z axes as well as the rotational and diagonal ones, and 2) a joystick at the level of the surgeon's mouth for adjustment of focus and zoom. The authors report on the initial experience with the use of the device at the Burdenko Neurosurgery Institute, where the senior author used it in approximately 600 procedures between 2006 and 2012. The surgeries ranged in difficulty and in duration (from 20 minutes to 7 hours, median 2.5 hours). Use of the Mari device resulted in increased accuracy of the surgical manipulations and a reduction in the duration of surgery.
    Journal of Neurosurgery 04/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Object Glutamate is important in the pathogenesis of brain damage after cerebral ischemia and traumatic brain injury. Notably, brain extracellular and cerebrospinal fluid as well as blood glutamate concentrations increase after experimental and clinical trauma. While neurons are one potential source of glutamate, platelets also release glutamate as part of their recruitment and might mediate neuronal damage. This study investigates the hypothesis that platelet microthrombi release glutamate that mediates excitotoxic brain injury and neuron dysfunction after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Methods The authors used two models, primary neuronal cultures exposed to activated platelets, as well as a whole-animal SAH preparation. Propidium iodide was used to evaluate neuronal viability, and surface glutamate receptor staining was used to evaluate the phenotype of platelet-exposed neurons. Results The authors demonstrate that thrombin-activated platelet-rich plasma releases glutamate, at concentrations that can exceed 300 μM. When applied to neuronal cultures, this activated plasma is neurotoxic, and the toxicity is attenuated in part by glutamate receptor antagonists. The authors also demonstrate that exposure to thrombin-activated platelets induces marked downregulation of the surface glutamate receptor glutamate receptor 2, a marker of excitotoxicity exposure and a possible mechanism of neuronal dysfunction. Linear regression demonstrated that 7 days after SAH in rats there was a strong correlation between proximity to microthrombi and reduction of surface glutamate receptors. Conclusions The authors conclude that platelet-mediated microthrombosis contributes to neuronal glutamate receptor dysfunction and might mediate brain injury after SAH.
    Journal of Neurosurgery 04/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Object Incidental colloid cysts are frequently managed with surveillance imaging rather than surgical excision. This approach is born out of their purported indolent growth pattern and the surgical morbidity associated with microsurgical removal. The advent of endoscopic colloid cyst removal may offer renewed assessment of these patients who carry a risk of acute neurological deterioration. An evidence-based recommendation should weigh the risks of operative treatment. Thus far, there has been no concentrated assessment of cyst removal in patients with incidental colloid cysts. The major objective in this study was to define the risks associated with the endoscopic surgical removal of incidentally diagnosed colloid cysts Methods A retrospective review of the medical records was performed to search for patients evaluated for a colloid cyst between the years 1996 and 2012. Eighty-seven patients underwent colloid cyst resection, and 34 were managed with nonoperative surveillance imaging. Microsurgical resections, endoscopic resections of residual or recurrent colloid cysts, and cases with unknown preoperative symptomatic status were excluded from further analysis. Seventy-seven cases of primary endoscopic resections were identified. Twenty resections were performed in patients with an incidental diagnosis and 57 in symptomatic individuals. Presenting characteristics and surgical outcomes were compared between the incidental and symptomatic groups. Results The mean age at surgery was 39.65 years for the incidental and 43.31 years for the symptomatic group (p = 0.36). The median maximal cyst diameter was 9.7 mm (range 3-31 mm) for the incidental and 12 mm (range 5-34 mm) for the symptomatic group. The mean frontal and occipital horn ratio was 0.3928 for the incidental and 0.4445 for the symptomatic group (p = 0.002). Total resection was achieved in 90% of the incidental and 82.3% of the symptomatic cases (p = 0.49). The median hospital stay was 1 day for incidental and 2 days for symptomatic cases (p = 0.006). There were no deaths. There was one case of aseptic meningitis in the incidental group. In the symptomatic group there were 3 complications: one patient with subjective memory impairment, one with transient short-term memory deterioration, and another with a superficial wound infection treated with operative debridement. Two patients from the symptomatic group needed a CSF diversion procedure, and no shunting was needed in the incidental group. There were two recurrences in the symptomatic group (78 and 133 months postoperatively) and none in the incidental group (p = 1). Conclusions Age and cyst diameter were not correlated with the absence or presence of symptoms in patients with a colloid cyst of the third ventricle. Operative results were highly favorable in both groups and did not reveal a higher risk of morbidity in the patient presenting with an incidental lesion. The results support endoscopic resection as a legitimate therapeutic option for patients with incidental colloid cysts. Generalization of the operative results should be cautiously made, since this is a limited series and the results may depend on the degree of neuroendoscopic experience.
    Journal of Neurosurgery 04/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Object The authors describe their experience with intracranial-to-intracranial (IC-IC) bypasses for complex anterior cerebral artery (ACA) aneurysms with giant size, dolichoectatic morphology, or intraluminal thrombus; they determine how others have addressed the limitations of ACA bypass; and they discuss clinical indications and microsurgical technique. Methods A consecutive, single-surgeon experience with ACA aneurysms and bypasses over a 16-year period was retrospectively reviewed. Bypasses for ACA aneurysms reported in the literature were also reviewed. Results Ten patients had aneurysms that were treated with ACA bypass as part of their surgical intervention. Four patients presented with subarachnoid hemorrhage and 3 patients with mass effect symptoms from giant aneurysms; 1 patient with bacterial endocarditis had a mycotic aneurysm, and 1 patient's meningioma resection was complicated by an iatrogenic pseudoaneurysm. One patient had his aneurysm discovered incidentally. There were 2 precommunicating aneurysms (A1 segment of the ACA), 5 communicating aneurysms (ACoA), and 3 postcommunicating (A2-A3 segments of the ACA). In situ bypasses were used in 4 patients (A3-A3 bypass), interposition bypasses in 4 patients, reimplantation in 1 patient (pericallosal artery-to-callosomarginal artery), and reanastomosis in 1 patient (pericallosal artery). Complete aneurysm obliteration was demonstrated in 8 patients, and bypass patency was demonstrated in 8 patients. One bypass thrombosed, but 4 years later. There were no operative deaths, and permanent neurological morbidity was observed in 2 patients. At last follow-up, 8 patients (80%) were improved or unchanged. In a review of the 29 relevant reports, the A3-A3 in situ bypass was used most commonly, extracranial (EC)-IC interpositional bypasses were the second most common, and reanastomosis and reimplantation were used the least. Conclusions Anterior cerebral artery aneurysms requiring bypass are rare and can be revascularized in a variety of ways. Anterior cerebral artery aneurysms, more than any other aneurysms, require a thorough survey of patient-specific anatomy and microsurgical options before deciding on an individualized management strategy. The authors' experience demonstrates a preference for IC-IC reconstruction, but EC-IC bypasses are reported frequently in the literature. The authors conclude that ACA bypass with indirect aneurysm occlusion is a good alternative to direct clip reconstruction for complex ACA aneurysms.
    Journal of Neurosurgery 04/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Object The choice of programmable or nonprogrammable shunts for the management of hydrocephalus after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) remains undefined. Variable intracranial pressures make optimal management difficult. Programmable shunts have been shown to reduce problems with drainage, but at 3 times the cost of nonprogrammable shunts. Methods All patients who underwent insertion of a ventriculoperitoneal shunt for hydrocephalus after aneurysmal SAH between 2006 and 2012 were included. Patients were divided into those in whom nonprogrammable shunts and those in whom programmable shunts were inserted. The rates of shunt revisions, the reasons for adjustments of shunt settings in patients with programmable devices, and the effectiveness of the adjustments were analyzed. A cost-benefit analysis was also conducted to determine if the overall cost for programmable shunts was more than for nonprogrammable shunts. Results Ninety-four patients underwent insertion of shunts for hydrocephalus secondary to SAH. In 37 of these patients, nonprogrammable shunts were inserted, whereas in 57 programmable shunts were inserted. Four (7%) of 57 patients with programmable devices underwent shunt revision, whereas 8 (21.6%) of 37 patients with nonprogrammable shunts underwent shunt revision (p = 0.0413), and 4 of these patients had programmable shunts inserted during shunt revision. In 33 of 57 patients with programmable shunts, adjustments were made. The adjustments were for a trial of functional improvement (n = 21), overdrainage (n = 5), underdrainage (n = 6), or overly sunken skull defect (n = 1). Of these 33 patients, 24 showed neurological improvements (p = 0.012). Cost-benefit analysis showed $646.60 savings (US dollars) per patient if programmable shunts were used, because the cost of shunt revision is a lot higher than the cost of the shunt. Conclusions The rate of shunt revision is lower in patients with programmable devices, and these are therefore more cost-effective. In addition, the shunt adjustments made for patients with programmable devices also resulted in better neurological outcomes.
    Journal of Neurosurgery 04/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Object The aim of this study was to prospectively evaluate atrophic changes in trigeminal nerves (TGNs) using measurements of volume (V) and cross-sectional area (CSA) from high-resolution 3-T MR images obtained in patients with unilateral trigeminal neuralgia (TN), and to correlate these data with patient and neurovascular compression (NVC) characteristics and with clinical outcomes. Methods Anatomical TGN parameters (V and CSA) were obtained in 50 patients (30 women and 20 men; mean age 56.42 years, range 22-79 years) with classic TN before treatment with microvascular decompression (MVD). Parameters were compared between the symptomatic (ipsilateralTN) and asymptomatic (contralateralTN) sides of the face. Twenty normal control subjects were also included. Two independent observers blinded to the side of pain separately analyzed the images. Measurements of V (from the pons to the entrance of the nerve into Meckel's cave) and CSA (at 5 mm from the entry of the TGN into the pons) for each TGN were performed using imaging software and axial and coronal projections, respectively. These data were correlated with patient characteristics (age, duration of symptoms before MVD, side of pain, sex, and area of pain distribution), NVC characteristics (type of vessel involved in NVC, location of compression along the nerve, site of compression around the circumference of the root, and degree of compression), and clinical outcomes at the 2-year follow-up after surgery. Comparisons were made using Bonferroni's test. Interobserver variability was assessed using the Pearson correlation coefficient. Results The mean V of the TGN on the ipsilateralTN (60.35 ± 21.74 mm(3)) was significantly smaller (p < 0.05) than those for the contralateralTN and controls (78.62 ± 24.62 mm(3) and 89.09 ± 14.72 mm(3), respectively). The mean CSA of the TGN on the ipsilateralTN (4.17 ± 1.74 mm(2)) was significantly smaller than those for the contralateralTN and controls (5.41 ± 1.89 mm(2) and 5.64 ± 0.85 mm(2), respectively). The ipsilateralTN with NVC Grade III (marked indentation) had a significantly smaller mean V than the ipsilateralTN with NVC Grade I (mere contact), although it was not significantly smaller than that of the ipsilateralTN with NVC Grade II (displacement or distortion of root). The ipsilateralTN with NVC Grade III had a significantly smaller mean CSA than the ipsilateralTN with NVC Grades I and II (p < 0.05). The TGN on the ipsilateralTN in cured patients had a smaller mean CSA than that on the ipsilateralTN of patients with partial pain relief or treatment failure (p < 0.05). The same finding was almost found in relation to measurements of V, but the p value was slightly higher at 0.05. Conclusions Results showed that TGN atrophy in patients with TN can be demonstrated by high-resolution imaging. These data suggest that atrophic changes in TGNs, which significantly correlated with the severity of compression and clinical outcomes, may help to predict long-term prognosis after vascular decompression.
    Journal of Neurosurgery 04/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Object When patients present to the emergency department (ED) with acute headache concerning for subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and a lumbar puncture (LP) shows blood in the CSF, it is difficult to distinguish the results of a traumatic LP from those of SAH. CT angiography (CTA) is often performed, but the long-term outcome for patients with a positive LP and normal neurovascular imaging remains uncertain. The primary objective of this study was to determine whether patients who presented to the ED with acute headache and had red blood cells (RBCs) in their CSF on LP but negative cerebrovascular imaging suffered subsequent SAH. Methods A case series study of consecutive adult ED patients who incurred charges for LP between 2001 and 2009 was performed from 2010 through 2011. Inclusion criteria were: headache, > 5 RBCs/mm(3) in CSF, noncontrast head CT with no evidence of hemorrhage, and cerebrovascular CTA or MRA without aneurysm or vascular lesion within 2 weeks of the ED visit. Patients with less than 6 months of available follow-up were excluded. The primary outcomes were 1) subsequent nontraumatic SAH and 2) new vascular lesion. Secondary outcomes were complications related to SAH, or LP or angiography. Results Of 4641 ED patients billed for an LP, 181 patients (mean age 42 years) were included in this study. Over a median follow-up of 53 months, 0 (0%) of 181 patients (95% CI 0%-2.0%) had a subsequent SAH or new vascular lesion identified. Although not the primary outcome, there was 1 patient who was ultimately diagnosed with vasculitis. Eighteen (9.9%) of 181 patients (95% CI 6.0%-15.3%) had an LP-related complication and 0 (0%) of 181 patients (95% CI 0%-2.0%) had an angiography-related complication. Conclusions Patients who present to the ED with acute headache concerning for SAH and have a finding of bloody CSF on LP but negative findings on cerebrovascular imaging are at low risk for subsequent SAH and thus are likely to be safe for discharge. Replacement of the CT/LP with a CT/CTA diagnostic algorithm merits further investigation.
    Journal of Neurosurgery 04/2014;

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