International Journal of Therapeutic Massage & Bodywork Research Education & Practice Impact Factor & Information

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ISSN 1916-257X
OCLC 405718430
Document type Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publications in this journal

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    ABSTRACT: Concussion, its recognition, diagnosis, and treatment is a growing public health issue. Massage practitioners who specialize in rehabilitation deal with a variety of injury cases that involve concussion, including those incurred by falls, motor vehicle incidents, and sports injuries. This case study presents a unique massage therapy approach to concussion trauma treatment. Male 23-year-old intramural soccer player diagnosed with postconcussion syndrome resulting from a fall. Assessment and treatment were completed in two sessions of 45 minutes spaced two days apart. Massage therapy techniques were applied to injury areas by a Licensed Massage Practitioner. Using the Balance Error Scoring System (BESS) and self-report, the outcome measures showed diminished concussion symptoms and regained ease in range of motion in the cervical area. Positive results for this case highlight the potential importance of massage therapy work to reduce headache, dizziness, and nausea in concussion recovery. In the presence of such outcomes, massage therapy may also have a supportive role in a person's return to function after concussion.
    International Journal of Therapeutic Massage & Bodywork Research Education & Practice 06/2015; 8(2):12-7. DOI:10.3822/ijtmb.v8i2.241
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    International Journal of Therapeutic Massage & Bodywork Research Education & Practice 06/2015; 8(2):1. DOI:10.3822/ijtmb.v8i2.286
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    International Journal of Therapeutic Massage & Bodywork Research Education & Practice 03/2015; 8(1):33. DOI:10.3822/ijtmb.v8i1.274
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    International Journal of Therapeutic Massage & Bodywork Research Education & Practice 03/2015; 8(1):1. DOI:10.3822/ijtmb.v8i1.271
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    International Journal of Therapeutic Massage & Bodywork Research Education & Practice 12/2014; 7(4):1. DOI:10.3822/ijtmb.v7i4.261
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    ABSTRACT: Thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) refers to a group of conditions resulting from compression of the neurovascular structures of the thoracic outlet. The parameters for physical therapy include myofascial release (MFR), neuromuscular therapy (NMT), muscle strengthening, and stretching. This case study examined the effects of neuromuscular therapy, massage, and other manual therapies on a 56-year-old female presenting with bilateral numbness over the forearms and hands on waking. Numbness occurred most days, progressing to "dead rubbery" forearms and hands once or twice a month. The treatment plan was implemented over eight weeks and consisted of six, 50-minute bodywork sessions. Several nonbodywork strategies were also employed to address potential contributing factors to the TOS symptomology experienced by the client. Objective measurements included posture analysis (PA), range of movement (ROM), and Roos and Adson's tests. The Measure Your Own Medical Outcome Profile (MYMOP2), a client-generated measure of clinical outcome, was used to measure clinical change. MYMOP2 overall profile score results demonstrated an improvement of 2.25 from pretreatment to post-treatment measurement. Clinically meaningful change was measured by the individual and was indicative of substantial symptom improvement where a score change of over one was considered as meaningful. A course of massage was effective for numbness symptoms in an individual with TOS, and results lasted over a year without additional treatments. Further research is needed to fully understand the effects of massage for TOS symptoms.
    International Journal of Therapeutic Massage & Bodywork Research Education & Practice 12/2014; 7(4):7-14. DOI:10.3822/ijtmb.v7i4.221
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    ABSTRACT: Study Design Prospective case series. Background These case reports present results of the treatment of lateral knee pain in four female amateur triathletes. The athletes were referred to the author’s clinic with either a diagnosis of iliotibial band friction syndrome or patellofemoral pain syndrome, all four having symptoms for longer than seven months. Changes in training routines were identified as the possible cause of the overuse injuries that eventually developed into chronic conditions. Intervention Treatment involved soft tissue mobilization of the musculotendinous structures on the lateral aspect of the knee. Results At four weeks, three of the athletes improved 9 to 19 points on the Lower Extremity Functional Scale, 3 to 5 points on the Global Rating of Change Scale, and demonstrated improvement in hamstring and iliotibial band flexibility. At eight weeks the Global Rating of Change for these three athletes was a 7 (“a very great deal better”) and they had returned to triathlon training with no complaints of lateral knee pain. One athlete did not respond to treatment and eventually underwent arthroscopic surgery for debridement of a lateral meniscus tear. Conclusions After ruling out common causes for lateral knee pain such as lateral meniscus tear, lateral collateral ligament sprain, patellofemoral dysfunction, osteochondral injury, biceps femoris tendonitis, iliotibial band friction syndrome or osteoarthritis, soft tissue restriction should be considered a potential source of dysfunction. In some cases soft tissue restriction is overlooked; athletes go undiagnosed and are limited from sports participation.
    International Journal of Therapeutic Massage & Bodywork Research Education & Practice 09/2014; 7(3):25-31. DOI:10.3822/ijtmb.v7i3.239
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    International Journal of Therapeutic Massage & Bodywork Research Education & Practice 09/2014; 7(3):1.
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    ABSTRACT: Background and Objective Bilateral cleft lips occur when the bones that form the upper lip fail to fuse at birth. Surgical reconstruction creates scars, which may lead to the following impairments: adhesions, decreased oral range of motion, decreased strength of orbicularis oris muscle, and asymmetry of oral region leading to poor self-esteem. The purpose of this case study is to determine the effectiveness of massage therapy in its ability to improve these impairments. Methods A five-week treatment plan consisting of fascial release, kneading, and intraoral techniques. Subjective information was assessed on two scales: restriction of scar and clients attitudes and acceptance of scar. Objective information was cataloged through photographs, a palpatory chart, and a self-created “Pen Test”. Results Results included increase range of motion and strength, decrease restrictions (palpable and subjective), and increase of symmetry. Client’s perceived confidence of scar and its appearance increased. Conclusions The evidence suggests that massage therapy helped with the impairments associated with scars formed by bilateral cleft lip reconstruction.
    International Journal of Therapeutic Massage & Bodywork Research Education & Practice 06/2014; 7(2):3-9.