International Journal of Therapeutic Massage & Bodywork Research Education & Practice

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  • ISSN
    1916-257X
  • OCLC
    405718430
  • Document type
    Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publications in this journal

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    ABSTRACT: Thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) refers to a group of conditions resulting from compression of the neurovascular structures of the thoracic outlet. The parameters for physical therapy include myofascial release (MFR), neuromuscular therapy (NMT), muscle strengthening, and stretching. This case study examined the effects of neuromuscular therapy, massage, and other manual therapies on a 56-year-old female presenting with bilateral numbness over the forearms and hands on waking. Numbness occurred most days, progressing to "dead rubbery" forearms and hands once or twice a month. The treatment plan was implemented over eight weeks and consisted of six, 50-minute bodywork sessions. Several nonbodywork strategies were also employed to address potential contributing factors to the TOS symptomology experienced by the client. Objective measurements included posture analysis (PA), range of movement (ROM), and Roos and Adson's tests. The Measure Your Own Medical Outcome Profile (MYMOP2), a client-generated measure of clinical outcome, was used to measure clinical change. MYMOP2 overall profile score results demonstrated an improvement of 2.25 from pretreatment to post-treatment measurement. Clinically meaningful change was measured by the individual and was indicative of substantial symptom improvement where a score change of over one was considered as meaningful. A course of massage was effective for numbness symptoms in an individual with TOS, and results lasted over a year without additional treatments. Further research is needed to fully understand the effects of massage for TOS symptoms.
    International Journal of Therapeutic Massage & Bodywork Research Education & Practice 12/2014; 7(4):7-14.
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    ABSTRACT: Back pain can be one of the most common health problems, causing suffering, disabilities, and financial losses. Postural models for pain treatment state that poor posture alters the joint position and causes pain, such as back pain. Muscular Chain Therapy (MCT) is a technique that is used to treat posture pathologies, among others.
    International Journal of Therapeutic Massage & Bodywork Research Education & Practice 09/2014; 7(3):2-6.
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    International Journal of Therapeutic Massage & Bodywork Research Education & Practice 09/2014; 7(3):25-31.
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    ABSTRACT: The health care landscape in Canada is changing rapidly as forces, such as an aging population, increasingly complex health issues and treatments, and economic pressure to reduce health care costs, bear down on the system. A cohesive national research agenda for massage therapy (MT) is needed in order to ensure maximum benefit is derived from research on treatment, health care policy, and cost effectiveness. A one-day invitational summit was held in Toronto, Ontario to build strategic alliances among Canadian and international researchers, policy makers, and other stakeholders to help shape a national research agenda for MT. Using a modified Delphi method, the summit organizers conducted two pre-summit surveys to ensure that time spent during the summit was relevant and productive. The summit was facilitated using the principles of Appreciative Inquiry which included a "4D" strategic planning approach (defining, discovery, dreaming, designing) and application of a SOAR framework (strengths, opportunities, aspirations, and results). Twenty-six researchers, policymakers, and other stakeholders actively participated in the events. Priority topics that massage therapists believe are important to the Canadian public, other health care providers, and policy makers and massage therapists themselves were identified. A framework for a national massage therapy (MT) research agenda, a grand vision of the future for MT research, and a 12-month action plan were developed. The summit provided an excellent opportunity for key stakeholders to come together and use their experience and knowledge of MT to develop a much-needed plan for moving the MT research and professionalization agenda forward.
    International Journal of Therapeutic Massage & Bodywork Research Education & Practice 03/2014; 7(1):3-10.
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    ABSTRACT: The IJTMB has a broad international (non-North American) readership, representing about one-third of all visitors to the Journal. What are the facilitators and barriers relevant to use of and participation in the IJTMB for international therapeutic massage and bodywork (TMB) researchers, educators, and practitioners? How can the IJTMB continue its growth and international recognition? This editorial looks at some of the opportunities for increased international involvement and relevancy, and the advantage of being open access for the non-North American audience.
    International Journal of Therapeutic Massage & Bodywork Research Education & Practice 03/2014; 7(1):1-2.
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    ABSTRACT: Following the inclusion of sensory abnormalities in the diagnostic criteria for autism, evidence has emerged showing that tactile abnormalities in young children with autism are severe, universally present, and directly related to delay of early self-regulation milestones required for social development. Parent touch is the most effective means of stimulating early self-regulation, yet parents of children with autism avoid touch because their children respond abnormally to it. This suggests that tactile abnormalities pose a barrier to parent touch in autism, and that treatment of tactile abnormalities may improve developmental outcomes. We have developed a qigong massage treatment for tactile abnormalities in young children with autism. Here we evaluate whether tactile abnormalities decrease following treatment, and whether treatment results in improved self-regulatory outcomes. We retrospectively analyzed our qigong massage database for treatment effect on tactile abnormalities, self-regulatory delay, and parenting stress. Five-month interval data were available for 129 children with autism aged 3-6 years. Of these 129, 97 received treatment and 32 were in the wait-list control condition. There were no differences between treatment and control groups by age, gender, or severity of tactile impairment. Treatment resulted in significant decreases of tactile impairment, self-regulatory delay, and parenting stress (p < .001 on all paired t-tests); mean decreases were 25.5%, 24.5%, and 35.8%, respectively. Results were significant compared to controls [F(3,122) = 11.27, p < .001]. In the pretreatment data, tactile impairment was directly related to self-regulatory delay; post-treatment, both variables decreased proportionally. Results demonstrate that tactile impairment in young children with autism is treatable with a qigong massage protocol. The direct relationship between tactile impairment and self-regulatory delay pretreatment, and the proportional decrease of both following treatment, suggest that tactile impairment is a cause of self-regulatory delay, and that qigong massage is a promising avenue to improve developmental outcomes in autism.
    International Journal of Therapeutic Massage & Bodywork Research Education & Practice 12/2013; 6(4):12-20.
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    ABSTRACT: This issue of the IJTMB includes articles that represent the scope of therapeutic massage and bodywork (TMB) practice and education. The two research articles represent the testing of deductive hypotheses not commonly seen in the TMB literature: the change in tactile abnormalities of young children with autism using qigong massage, and changes in postural balance from massage to the muscles associated with the mandibular trigeminal nerve. The education editorial opens the IJTMB dialogue on the need, value, and issues of competency-based education relative to hours-based programming.
    International Journal of Therapeutic Massage & Bodywork Research Education & Practice 12/2013; 6(4):1-2.
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    ABSTRACT: What does it mean to be competent and why is this so important? While there is no generally accepted definition of competency, there are key components that should guide the emerging movement of competency-based education (CBE). In addition, entry-level massage curricula typically run from approximately 500 clock hours to 3000 hours or more. This discrepancy demonstrates markedly divergent opinions on what constitutes the required amount of time (content) for entry-level massage and bodywork curriculum. Some programs have begun using competency models, but there is no broad implementation of CBE. A first step is to come to some agreement on what competencies are actually needed for an entry-level massage therapist. A current effort is underway in the United States that should lay essential groundwork for greater adoption of CBE models.
    International Journal of Therapeutic Massage & Bodywork Research Education & Practice 12/2013; 6(4):3-5.
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    ABSTRACT: This editorial tracks progress from informal conversations in 2001 to the fifth anniversary publication of the International Journal of Therapeutic Massage and Bodywork: Research Education and Practice, the only open-source, peer-reviewed journal specifically dedicated to the scientific exploration of therapeutic massage practice and education.
    International Journal of Therapeutic Massage & Bodywork Research Education & Practice 06/2013; 6(2):1-2.