Dental materials: official publication of the Academy of Dental Materials

Publisher: Elsevier

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  • Impact factor
    2.88
  • 5-year impact
    0.00
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  • ISSN
    1879-0097

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Elsevier

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Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To evaluate zirconia-based fixed partial dentures (FPDs) after more than 8 years in clinical service. Patients treated between 2000 and 2004 with zirconia FPDs were identified from the records of a manufacturer of FPD substructures. Of the 45 patients who met the inclusion criteria 30 attended the appointment and 33 FPDs were evaluated using modified California Dental Association (CDA) criteria. In addition, plaque and the bleeding index were registered. Patient satisfaction with the restorations was evaluated using a 10-point visual analog scale (VAS). All the FPDs were made using CAD/CAM and hot isostatic pressed yttria-tetragonal zirconia polycrystal (HIPed Y-TZP) ceramic (Denzir) and were placed within general practices. The mean observation period was 9.6±1.6 years (range 3.0-13.1 years). The CDA rating was 90% satisfactory for the surface. Corresponding figures for anatomic form, color and margin integrity were 94%, 100% and 94%, respectively. Regarding surface three (9.7%) FPDs exhibited veneer chipping and were rated 'not acceptable'. For margin integrity two (6.5%) were rated 'not acceptable' because of caries. For anatomic form two (6.1%) were rated 'not acceptable' due to two lost FPDs. No significant differences were seen between the FPDs and controls for plaque and bleeding. The Kaplan-Meier survival rate (still in clinical function) was 94%, the success rate (technical events accounted for) 91% and (biological events accounted for) 73%. Based on the VAS the mean value for patient satisfaction was 9.3±1.2. Ninety-four percent of the FPDs were still in clinical function. HIPed Y-TZP could serve as an alternative for FPD treatments similar to those in the current study. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
    Dental materials: official publication of the Academy of Dental Materials 12/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: 2-Hydroxyethylmethacrylate (HEMA) diffuses in wet dentin and promotes adhesion during dentin priming and bonding. We have investigated the molecular level interaction between HEMA and a collagen model by using saturation transfer difference (STD) NMR. The binding of HEMA to collagen was preliminarily investigated by suspending demineralized human dentin powders in a 4mM HEMA solution for 1h and measuring the decrease in the HEMA concentration on a spectrophotometer. The molecular level interaction of HEMA with atelocollagen, which was used as a collagen model, was investigated by STD-NMR spectroscopy. The HEMA concentration in the suspension did not change, indicating that HEMA did not bind to dentin collagen. This was confirmed by STD-NMR; when the atelocollagen resonance was saturated, no saturation was propagated to HEMA and no STD signals were detected. The HEMA protons were not near the atelocollagen surface, indicating HEMA did not interact with atelocollagen. The collagen fibrils may be surrounded by water molecules in dentin/bond interfaces, which prevent the direct HEMA binding interaction. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
    Dental materials: official publication of the Academy of Dental Materials 12/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: To use the Kubelka-Munk theory to evaluate the scattering (S), absorption (K) and transmittance (T) of non-colored and colored dental zirconia systems and human (HD) and bovine (BD) dentins. Two zirconia systems were used: ZC- ZirCAD (Ivoclar Vivadent) and LV-LAVA (3M ESPE). Specimens from each ceramic system were divided into 3 groups (n=5): ZC1 and LV1 (non-colored); ZC2 and LV2 colored to shade A1, and ZC3 and LV3 colored to shade A3. Five human and bovine anterior teeth were flattened and polished through 1200 grit SiC paper to expose the superficial buccal dentin. All samples were prepared to a final thickness of 0.5mm. Diffuse reflectance was measured against white and black backgrounds, using a spectroradiometer in a viewing booth with D65 illuminant and d/0° geometry. S and K coefficients and T were calculated using Kubelka-Munk's equations. Data was statistically analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis, Mann-Whitney tests, and VAF coefficient. Spectral distributions of S, K and T were wavelength dependent. The spectral behavior of S and T was similar to HD (VAF≥96.80), even though they were statistically different (p≤0.05). The spectral behavior of K was also similar to HD, except for LV1 (VAF=38.62), yet all ceramics were statistically different from HD (p≤0.05). HD and BD showed similar values of S and T (p>0.05). The dental professional should consider the optical behavior differences between the zirconia systems evaluated and the human dentin to achieve optimal esthetics in restorative dentistry. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
    Dental materials: official publication of the Academy of Dental Materials 12/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Although temporization is intended as an interim step, complexity of individual treatment situations may demand medium to longer term use of temporary appliances in clinical practice. The durability and integrity of these restorations for continued use to meet the treatment demands is therefore an important clinical problem. The goal of this study was to evaluate the short to medium term stability of these materials under controlled loading to study their stress relaxation behavior. Acrylic resins (poly(methyl) and poly(ethyl) methacrylate) and bis-acryl composite resins were tested in vitro in this study. The stress decay data with time (under an applied constant strain) due to internal strain caused by molecular relaxation were systematically analyzed using important parameters derived from stress changes with time. The results showed significant differences in the stress relaxation behavior between different materials which may have significant bearing on their durability in medium to longer term interim clinical applications. Poly(ethyl) methacrylate (PEMA) resins subjected to applied constant strain over a period of time showed large time dependent decay of applied stress, indicating very high internal molecular relaxation effects, relative to those of poly(methyl) methacrylate (PMMA) and bis-acryl composites. The results showed that PMMA and composite resins were superior in their ability to maintain constant strain without excessive dissipation of applied stress than PEMA resin. This suggests that internal strain caused by molecular relaxation events may lead to excessive dimensional instability in PEMA. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
    Dental materials: official publication of the Academy of Dental Materials 12/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Dental alloys containing indium (In) have been used in dental restoration for two decades; however, no study has investigated the biological effects of In ions, which may be released in the oral cavity, on human oral keratinocytes. The objective of the present study was to investigate the biological effects of In ions on human oral keratinocyte after confirming their release from a silver-palladium-gold-indium (Ag-Pd-Au-In) dental alloy. As a corrosion assay, a static immersion tests were performed by detecting the released ions in the corrosion solution from the Ag-Pd-Au-In dental alloy using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy. The cytotoxicity and biological effects of In ions were then studied with In compounds in three human oral keratinocyte cell lines: immortalized human oral keratinocyte (IHOK), HSC-2, and SCC-15. Higher concentrations of In and Cu ions were detected in Ag-Pd-Au-In (P<0.05) than in Ag-Pd-Au, and AgCl deposition occurred on the surface of Ag-Pd-Au-In after a 7-day corrosion test due to its low corrosion resistance. At high concentrations, In ions induced cytotoxicity; however, at low concentrations (∼0.8In(3+)mM), terminal differentiation was observed in human oral keratinocytes. Intracellular ROS was revealed to be a key component of In-induced terminal differentiation. In ions were released from dental alloys containing In, and high concentrations of In ions resulted in cytotoxicity, whereas low concentrations induced the terminal differentiation of human oral keratinocytes via increased intracellular ROS. Therefore, dental alloys containing In must be biologically evaluated for their safe use. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
    Dental materials: official publication of the Academy of Dental Materials 12/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Nowadays direct and indirect resin composites are frequently applied to build up the occlusion when extensive tooth wear took place. To achieve long-lasting restorations it is essential to obtain knowledge about their interactions due to occlusal contacts. Therefore, the two- and three-body wear between frequently used direct and indirect resin composites was investigated. The two- and three-body wear of three direct resin composites and three indirect resin composites, with Clearfil AP-X, Filtek Z250, and Filtek Supreme XT as antagonists, were measured, using the ACTA wear device. The wear rates were determined and the surfaces were evaluated with SEM. The most remarkable outcome was that the two-body wear rate of the different composites opposing the Z250 wheel were significantly higher. Furthermore, it was shown that the three-body wear rate was independent on the antagonist and in general higher than the two-body wear rate. To reduce abrasion of the opposing resin composite surface the resin composite fillers should consist of a softer glass, e.g. barium glass or in case of a harder filler the size should be reduced to nano-size. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
    Dental materials: official publication of the Academy of Dental Materials 12/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Human intrapupal tooth temperature is considered to be similar to that of the body (≈37°C), although the actual temperature has never been measured. This study evaluated the in vivo, human, basal, coronal intrapulpal temperature of anesthetized upper first premolars. After approval of the local Ethics Committee was obtained (protocol no. 255,945), upper right and left first premolars requiring extraction for orthodontic reasons from 8 volunteers, ranging from 12 to 30 years old, received infiltrative and intraligamental anesthesia. The teeth (n=15) were isolated using rubber dam and a small, occlusal preparation was made using high-speed handpiece, under constant air-water spray, until a minute pulp exposure was attained. The sterile probe from a wireless, NIST-traceable, temperature acquisition system (Thermes WFI) was inserted directly into the coronal pulp. Once the probe was properly positioned and stable, real-time temperature data were continuously acquired for approximately 25min. Data (°C) were subjected to 2-tailed, paired t-test (α=0.05), and the 95% confidence intervals for the initial and 25-min mean temperatures were also determined. The initial pulp temperature value (31.8±1.5°C) was significantly lower than after 25-min (35.3±0.7°C) (p<0.05). The 95% confidence interval for the initial temperature ranged from 31.0 to 32.6°C and from 35.0 to 35.7°C after 25min. A slow, gradual temperature increase was observed after probe insertion until the pulp temperature reached a plateau, usually after 15min. Consistent coronal, human, in vivo temperature values were observed and were slightly, but significantly below that of body core temperature. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
    Dental materials: official publication of the Academy of Dental Materials 12/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Many dental devices, such as partial dentures, combine acrylic and metallic parts that are bonded together. These devices often present catastrophic mechanical failures due to weak bonding between their acrylic and metallic components. The bonding between alloys and polymers (e.g. poly(methyl methacrylate), PMMA) usually is just a mechanical interlock, since they do not chemically bond spontaneously. The aim of this study was to develop a new method to make a strong chemical bond between alloys and polymers for dental prostheses based on diazonium chemistry. The method was based on two steps. In the first step (primer), aryldiazonium salts were grafted onto the metallic surfaces. The second step (adhesive) was optimized to achieve covalent binding between the grafted layer and PMMA. The chemical composition of the treated surfaces was analyzed with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and the tensile or shear bonding strength between metals and poly(methyl methacrylate) was measured. XPS and contact angle measurements confirmed the presence of a polymer coating on the treated metallic surfaces. Mechanical tests showed a significant increase in bond strength between PMMA and treated titanium or stainless steel wire by 5.2 and 2.5 folds, respectively, compared to the untreated control group (p<0.05). Diazonium chemistry is an effective technique for achieving a strong chemical bond between alloys and PMMA, which can help improve the mechanical properties of dental devices. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
    Dental materials: official publication of the Academy of Dental Materials 12/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: This 10-year retrospective study investigated the differences in the changes and the longevity of Class II restorations using 4 similar microhybrid resin composites (Filtek Z250, Herculite XR, Gradia Direct Posterior, Renew). Data were collected from patient records. Those patients who received posterior restoration between 2001 and 2003, and who still visited the clinical practice for regular check-up visits were selected. A total of 225 adult patients (86 males, 139 females) with 701 restorations were evaluated by 2 operators using the USPHS criteria. Data were analyzed with Fisher's Exact Test, Pearson's Chi-Square Test and Kaplan-Meier analysis (p<0.05). A failure rate of 2.1% was detected. The reasons of failures included restoration fracture, secondary caries and endodontic treatment. Similar survival rates for Gradia Direct Posterior (91.25%) and Renew (92.19%) were observed; better performance was observed with the Filtek Z250 (99.1%) and Herculite XR (98.64%). There was a higher probability of failure in 3 surface (n=10) than in 2 surface (n=5) restorations (p<0.001), and this rate was similar when molars (n=8) and premolars (n=7) were compared. The most frequent but clinically acceptable deficiency was the marginal discoloration. All four microhybrid resin composites showed acceptable clinical durability in Class II restorations during the 10-year follow-up period, with an overall survival rate of >97.8%. Higher rates of failures and deficiencies were observed with the Renew (fracture) and Gradia Direct Posterior (color match), respectively. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
    Dental materials: official publication of the Academy of Dental Materials 12/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Osteoporosis is one of the most common bone diseases in the world and results from an imbalance of bone cell functions. In the process of guided bone regeneration, osteoporosis weakens the bonding strength between scaffold and bone. Naringin is evidenced to be effective for the treatment of osteoporosis and bone resorption and the aim was to explore methods and benefits of its incorporation.
    Dental materials: official publication of the Academy of Dental Materials 09/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: To evaluate the efficacy on flexural properties of flowable dental resin composite reinforced with short glass fiber of different aspect ratios (ARs) and volume percent loadings. It is hypothesized that with the addition of randomly oriented fibers it is possible to significantly improve flexural strength and modulus while maintaining flowability.
    Dental materials: official publication of the Academy of Dental Materials 09/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: This study aimed to investigate how the structural stress distribution in human teeth could be affected by the presence of a graded material distribution often found in nature using the finite element (FE) method.
    Dental materials: official publication of the Academy of Dental Materials 09/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Adding antimicrobial/anti-MMP quaternary ammonium methacrylates (QAMs) to comonomer blends should not weaken the mechanical properties of dental resins. This work evaluated the degree conversion and mechanical properties of BisGMA/TEGDMA/HEMA (60:30:10) containing 0-15 mass% QAMs A-E (A: 2-acryloxyethyltrimethyl ammonium chloride; B: [3-(methacryloylamino)propyl]trimethylammonium chloride; C: [2-(methacryloxy)ethyl] trimethyl ammonium chloride; D: diallyldimethyl ammonium chloride; E: 2-(methacryloyloxy) ethyltrimethyl ammonium methyl sulfate.
    Dental materials: official publication of the Academy of Dental Materials 09/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Dental zirconia restorations should present long-term clinical survival and be in service within the oral environment for many years. However, low temperature degradation could affect their mechanical properties and survival. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of in vitro aging on the flexural strength of yttrium-stabilized (Y-TZP) zirconia ceramics for ceramic restorations.
    Dental materials: official publication of the Academy of Dental Materials 06/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Various sealant materials have been suggested to decrease decalcification during orthodontic treatment. However, only a few in vitro studies on the cytotoxicity of resinous pit and fissure sealants have been published, and to the best of our knowledge no similar studies are available for the enamel sealants used in orthodontics. Therefore, we aimed to characterize the possible adverse effects of enamel sealants, especially on the gingival epithelium.
    Dental materials: official publication of the Academy of Dental Materials 06/2014;