Dental materials: official publication of the Academy of Dental Materials Journal Impact Factor & Information

Publisher: Elsevier

Journal description

Current impact factor: 4.16

Impact Factor Rankings

2015 Impact Factor Available summer 2015
2013 / 2014 Impact Factor 4.16
2012 Impact Factor 3.773
2011 Impact Factor 3.135
2010 Impact Factor 2.92
2009 Impact Factor 2.882
2008 Impact Factor 2.941
2007 Impact Factor 2.99
2006 Impact Factor 2.381
2005 Impact Factor 2.056
2004 Impact Factor 2.057
2003 Impact Factor 2.064
2002 Impact Factor 1.912
2001 Impact Factor 1.441
2000 Impact Factor 1.016
1999 Impact Factor 0.884
1998 Impact Factor 1.434
1997 Impact Factor 1.34
1996 Impact Factor 1.241
1995 Impact Factor 1.362
1994 Impact Factor 1.601
1993 Impact Factor 1.055
1992 Impact Factor 0.938

Impact factor over time

Impact factor
Year

Additional details

5-year impact 0.00
Cited half-life 5.50
Immediacy index 0.46
Eigenfactor 0.01
Article influence 0.80
ISSN 1879-0097

Publisher details

Elsevier

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    • Permitted deposit due to Funding Body, Institutional and Governmental policy or mandate, may be required to comply with embargo periods of 12 months to 48 months .
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    • NIH Authors articles will be submitted to PubMed Central after 12 months
    • Publisher last contacted on 18/10/2013
  • Classification
    ​ green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Since bulk-fill (BF) resin composites should cure efficiently to a depth up to 4mm, the aim of the study was to determine the time-dependence of degree of conversion (DC) at that depth during 24h post-irradiation. Eight representative BF resin composites were studied [x-tra base (XTB), Venus Bulk Fill (VBF), Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill (TECBF), Sonic Fill (SF), Filtek Bulk Fill (FBF), everX Posterior (eXP), Beautifil-Bulk Flowable (BBF), Beautifil-Bulk Restorative (BBR)]. Specimens were fabricated in white Delrin moulds of 4mm height and 5mm internal diameter directly on an attenuated total reflectance (ATR) accessory attachment of an (FTIR) spectrometer (Nicolet iS50, Thermo Fisher, Madison, USA). Upper specimen surfaces were irradiated in situ for 20 s with an LED curing unit (Elipar S10 with average tip irradiance of 1200 mW/cm(2)). Spectra from the lower surface were recorded continuously in real-time for 5min and then at 30 and 60min and 24h post irradiation. Mean ranges of DC4mm (%) of the materials at 4mm depth were 39-67; 48-75; 45-74; and 50-72 at 5, 30 and 60min and 24h respectively. DCs for XTB, VBF, TECBF, FBF, BBR increased significantly 30min after irradiation (p<0.05) and were not affected by subsequent time up to 24h (p>0.05). DC for SF was not affected by subsequent time after 5min (p>0.05). For eXP and BBF, DC increased 24h after irradiation (p<0.05). The data were described by the superposition of two exponential functions characterising the gel phase (described by parameters a, b) and the glass phase (described by parameters c and d). Post polymerization impact of bulk-fill composites is material dependent. Five materials exhibited their maximum DC4mm already 30min after starting the irradiation while DC4mm for two materials optimized after 24h. BF materials were found to exhibit after 24h a DC between 50 and 72% at 4mm depth under the stated irradiation conditions. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
    Dental materials: official publication of the Academy of Dental Materials 08/2015; DOI:10.1016/j.dental.2015.07.004
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    ABSTRACT: A recent 3-year randomized controlled trial (RCT) of tooth supported three- to five-unit zirconia-ceramic and metal-ceramic posterior fixed dental prostheses (FDPs) revealed that veneer chipping and fracture in zirconia-ceramic systems occurred more frequently than those in metal-ceramic systems [1]. This study seeks to elucidate the underlying mechanisms responsible for the fracture phenomena observed in this RCT using a descriptive fractographic analysis. Vinyl-polysiloxane impressions of 12 zirconia-ceramic and 6 metal-ceramic FDPs with veneer fractures were taken from the patients at the end of a mean observation of 40.3±2.8 months. Epoxy replicas were produced from these impressions [1]. All replicas were gold coated, and inspected under the optical microscope and scanning electron microscope (SEM) for descriptive fractography. Among the 12 zirconia-ceramic FDPs, 2 had small chippings, 9 had large chippings, and 1 exhibited delamination. Out of 6 metal-ceramic FDPs, 5 had small chippings and 1 had large chipping. Descriptive fractographic analysis based on SEM observations revealed that fracture initiated from the wear facet at the occlusal surface in all cases, irrespective of the type of restoration. Zirconia-ceramic and metal-ceramic FDPs all fractured from microcracks that emanated from occlusal wear facets. The relatively low fracture toughness and high residual tensile stress in porcelain veneer of zirconia restorations may contribute to the higher chipping rate and larger chip size in zirconia-ceramic FDPs relative to their metal-ceramic counterparts. The low veneer/core interfacial fracture energy of porcelain-veneered zirconia may result in the occurrence of delamination in zirconia-ceramic FDPs. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
    Dental materials: official publication of the Academy of Dental Materials 07/2015; DOI:10.1016/j.dental.2015.07.003
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    ABSTRACT: To investigate the sorption, solubility, mass change and hygroscopic expansion (solvent swelling) of resin-composites after long term storage in different solvents. Eight materials were studied: two bulk-fill flowable materials (SDR and Venus bulk fill, V-BF), a packable bulk-fill material (Tetric Evoceram bulk-fill, TET-BF), a fiber reinforced material (Ever X posterior, EVX), a nano-hybrid conventional material (Tetric Evoceram, TET) and micro-hybrid conventional materials (G-aenial anterior, GA-P and posterior, GA-A). Three groups of disk shaped specimens were prepared using split stainless steel molds. Each group was stored, respectively, in: water, 75% ethanol/water and methyl ethyl ketone (MEK). The total storage time was 180 d plus a reconditioning time of 120 d. A non-contact laser scanning micrometer was used to measure the diametral changes. Significant differences were found in the sorption and solubility of the materials. Generally, MEK stored specimens had the highest values followed by 75% ethanol/water then water. A similar trend was found with the mass and volume changes (except for EVX). V-BF showed the highest sorption (98.1μg/mm(3)) and solubility (10μg/mm(3)) after MEK storage. Mass and volume changes showed near-linear correlation, with high Pearson coefficients (0.86-0.99). Generally the materials were most greatly affected by MEK storage compared to the other two solvents. The glass-fiber-reinforced EVX, however, was most affected by water immersion. The pattern of change/recovery behavior of the materials, during solvent challenge, was similar to the pattern of viscoelastic creep/recovery behavior of resin-composite materials. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
    Dental materials: official publication of the Academy of Dental Materials 07/2015; DOI:10.1016/j.dental.2015.06.003
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The objective of this article is to discuss the evidence for polymerization shrinkage and shrinkage stress of dental composite restoratives in terms of its potential relevance to the clinical situation METHODS: Articles relating to the issue of polymerization contraction stress generation in dental composite materials, and the factors that influence it, were reviewed and included. Particular attention was paid to evidence derived from clinical studies. Articles were identified through PubMed and through the bibliographies of other articles. There is extensive evidence for the presence of polymerization contraction stress in dental composites, as well as evidence for its deleterious effects, which include marginal leakage, gap formation, cuspal deflection, tooth cracking, reduced bond strength and lowered mechanical properties of the restorative. There is little, if any, direct evidence for the clinical effect of these contraction stresses. No study has directly established a link between these stresses and enhanced postoperative sensitivity or recurrent caries, for example. However, the concern over these stresses and the manner in which they influence the placement of current composite materials demonstrates that they are considered to be very important. Though no direct evidence exists to prove that the generation of contraction stress in dental composite restorations causes reduced clinical longevity, the indirect evidence from numerous in vitro studies and the concern over controlling their effects proves that they are clinically relevant. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
    Dental materials: official publication of the Academy of Dental Materials 07/2015; DOI:10.1016/j.dental.2015.06.020
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    ABSTRACT: The bone bonding to a titanium dental implant surface strongly depends on their individual chemical surface properties. Here we hypothesize that a tailored surface chemistry obtained through a self-assembled monolayer technique on the titanium surface and subsequent immobilization of biological agents can be arbitrarily adjusted to meet any desired requirements for future dental applications. Self-assembled monolayers were applied to titanium surfaces inducing -(CH2)nCH2, -(CH2)n-NH2, -(CH2)n-OH, and -(CH2)n-COOH functional groups. To investigate the cytocompatibility of these modifications, human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were seeded on the functionalized surfaces and characterized by live/dead staining and cell proliferation. Additionally, bovine serum albumin (BSA) as a model protein was immobilized on the functionalized surfaces. Water contact angle measurements and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) proved a successful functional group coupling on the surface. Cell proliferation and viability was supported on the functionalized surfaces. The immobilized proteins were detected on each functionalized surface with an increase in quantity in the following order: -(CH2)n-COOH< -(CH2)n-NH2, -(CH2)n-OH< -(CH2)nCH2. The successful immobilization of BSA by carboxyl-to-amine cross-linking was spectrophotometrically confirmed. It was proved that self-assembled monolayer (SAM)-technique can be utilized to couple diverse functional groups and biological agents on titanium surfaces allowing controlled design of their surface chemistry. The novel functionalization technique and the new knowledge on MSCs response holds great potential for the development of novel functionalized and biologically activated titanium-based dental implants. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
    Dental materials: official publication of the Academy of Dental Materials 07/2015; DOI:10.1016/j.dental.2015.06.019
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    ABSTRACT: To evaluate the sealing ability and the microtensile bond strength (MTBS) of different adhesive systems bonded to dentin in class I cavities. Round tapered dentin cavities (3-mm diameter, 1.5-mm height) prepared in extracted human molars were restored using composite resin (Clearfil Majesty Posterior) with two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive system (Adper Single Bond 2: ASB2), two-step self-etch adhesive (Clearfil SE Bond: CSEB), all-in-one adhesives (G-Bond Plus: GBP; Tri-S Bond Plus: TSBP), or no adhesive (Control), or bonded using low-shrinkage composite with its proper adhesive (Filtek Silorane, Silorane Adhesive System: FSS). After 24-h water storage or 10,000 cycles of thermal stress, the specimens were immersed into a contrast agent. Two and three-dimensional images were obtained using optical coherence tomography (OCT). The mean percentage of high brightness (HB%) at the interfacial zone in cross-sectional images was calculated as an indicator of contrast agent or gap at the interface. The specimens were then sectioned into beams and the MTBS measured. The HB% (ASB2=TSBP=CSEB<FSS=GBP) and MTBS (CSEB=ASB2, CSEB>TSBP=GBP=FSS, ASB2>FSS) differed significantly among the adhesives. After aging, HB% increased for GBP and FSS specimens, and the MTBS decreased for FSS specimens (ANOVA, Tukey's post hoc, p<0.05). The HB% and MTBS were significantly and negatively correlated (p=0.002). Confocal laser scanning and scanning electron micrographs confirmed contrast agent infiltration within the gap. There was a significant correlation between sealing performance and bond strength of the adhesives in the whole cavity. After aging, the two-step systems showed equal or superior performance to the all-in-one and Silorane systems. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
    Dental materials: official publication of the Academy of Dental Materials 07/2015; DOI:10.1016/j.dental.2015.06.013
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    ABSTRACT: Ceramic composites are promising materials for dental restorations. However, it is difficult to prepare highly translucent composites due to the light scattering that occurs in multiphase ceramics. The objective of this work was to verify the effectiveness of a systematic approach in designing specific glass compositions with target properties in order to prepare glass infiltrated ceramic composites with high translucency. First it was necessary to calculate from literature data the viscosity of glass at the infiltration temperature using the SciGlass software. Then, a glass composition was designed for targeted viscosity and refractive index. The glass of the system SiO2-B2O3-Al2O3-La2O3-TiO2 prepared by melting the oxide raw materials was spontaneously infiltrated into porous alumina preforms at 1200°C. The optical properties were evaluated using a refractometer and a spectrophotometer. The absorption and scattering coefficients were calculated using the Kubelka-Munk model. The light transmittance of prepared composite was significantly higher than a commercial ceramic-glass composite, due to the matching of glass and preform refractive indexes which decreased the scattering, and also to the decrease in absorption coefficient. The proposed systematic approach was efficient for development of glass infiltrated ceramic composites with high translucency, which benefits include the better aesthetic performance of the final prosthesis. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
    Dental materials: official publication of the Academy of Dental Materials 07/2015; DOI:10.1016/j.dental.2015.06.015
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The objectives of this study were to: (1) develop a novel adhesive for prevention of tooth root caries and secondary caries by possessing a combination of protein-repellent, antibacterial, and remineralization capabilities for the first time; and (2) investigate the effects of 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC), dimethylaminohexadecyl methacrylate (DMAHDM), and nanoparticles of amorphous calcium phosphate (NACP) on dentin bond strength, protein-repellent properties, and dental plaque microcosm biofilm response. MPC, DMAHDM and NACP were added into Scotchbond Multi-Purpose primer and adhesive. Dentin shear bond strengths were measured. Adhesive coating thickness, surface texture and dentin-adhesive interfacial structure were examined. Protein adsorption onto adhesive resin surface was determined by the micro bicinchoninic acid method. A human saliva microcosm biofilm model was used to investigate biofilm metabolic activity, colony-forming unit (CFU) counts, and lactic acid production. The resin with 7.5% MPC+5% DMAHDM+30% NACP did not adversely affect dentin shear bond strength (p>0.1). The resin with 7.5% MPC+5% DMAHDM+30% NACP produced a coating on root dentin with a thickness of approximately 70μm and completely sealed all the dentinal tubules. The resin with 7.5% MPC+5% DMAHDM+30% NACP had 95% reduction in protein adsorption, compared to SBMP control (p<0.05). The resin with 7.5% MPC+5% DMAHDM+30% NACP was strongly antibacterial, with biofilm CFU being four orders of magnitude lower than that of SBMP control. Significance The novel multifunctional adhesive with strong protein-repellent, antibacterial and remineralization properties is promising to coat tooth roots to prevent root caries and secondary caries. The combined use of MPC, DMAHDM and NACP may have wide applicability to bonding agents, cements, sealants and composites to inhibit caries. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. All rights reserved.
    Dental materials: official publication of the Academy of Dental Materials 07/2015; DOI:10.1016/j.dental.2015.06.010
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    ABSTRACT: Mismatch in thermal expansion coefficient between core and veneering ceramic (Δα=αcore-αveneer, ppm/°C) is reported as a crucial parameter influencing veneer fractures with Yttria-tetragonal-zirconia-polycrystal (Y-TZP) prostheses, which still constitutes a misunderstood problem. However, the common positive Δα concept remains empirical. The objective of this study is to investigate the Δα dependence of residual stress profiles in veneering ceramic layered on Y-TZP frameworks. The stress profile was measured with the hole-drilling method in bilayered disc samples of 20mm diameter with a 0.7mm thick Y-TZP framework and a 1.5mm thick veneer layer. 3 commercial and 4 experimental veneering ceramics (n=3 per group) were used to obtain different Δα varying from -1.3ppm/°C to +3.2ppm/°C, which were determined by dilatometric analyses. Veneer fractures were observed in samples with Δα≥+2.3 or ≤-0.3ppm/°C. Residual stress profiles measured in other groups showed compressive stresses in the surface, these stresses decreasing with depth and then becoming more compressive again near the interface. Small Δα variations were shown to induce significant changes in residual stress profiles. Compressive stress near the framework was found to decrease inversely to Δα. Veneer CTE close to Y-TZP (+0.2ppm/°C Δα) gived the most favorable stress profile. Yet, near the framework, Δα-induced residual stress varied inversely to predictions. This could be explained by the hypothesis of structural changes occurrence within the Y-TZP surface. Consequently, the optimum Δα value cannot be determined before understanding Y-TZP's particular behavior when veneered. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
    Dental materials: official publication of the Academy of Dental Materials 07/2015; DOI:10.1016/j.dental.2015.06.017
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    ABSTRACT: Released components of oral biomaterials can leach into the oral cavity and may subsequently reach the gastrointestinal tract. Camphorquinone (CQ) is the most common used photoinitiator in resinous restorative materials and is often combined with the co-initiator N,N-dimethyl-p-toluidine (DMT). It has been shown that CQ exerts cytotoxic effects, at least partially due to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Objective of this study was to examine the cytotoxic and genotoxic potential of CQ in human oral keratinocytes (OKF6/TERT2) and immortalized epithelial colorectal adenocarcinoma cells (Caco-2). Furthermore, the effects of visible-light irradiation and the co-initiator DMT were investigated as well as the generation of ROS, the potential protective effect of glutathione (GSH) and a recovery period of CQ-treated Caco-2 cells. The alkaline comet assay was used to determine DNA damage. Additionally, an enzyme modified comet assay was applied, which detects 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine (8-oxoguanine), a reliable marker for oxidative stress. Our data revealed that high concentrations of CQ induced DNA lesions in OKF6/TERT2 cells. This DNA damage is at least partly caused by the generation of 8-oxoguanine. In addition, CQ and DMT increased ROS formation and induced DNA damage in Caco-2 cells. CQ-treatment resulted in generation of 8-oxoguanine. The antioxidant GSH efficiently prevented CQ-associated DNA damage. Furthermore, a recovery following CQ-treatment significantly reduced DNA damage. We conclude that CQ-induced DNA damage is caused by oxidative stress in oral and intestinal cells. These lesions can be prevented and possibly repaired by GSH-treatment and recovery of cells after the photoinitiator is removed from cultures. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
    Dental materials: official publication of the Academy of Dental Materials 07/2015; DOI:10.1016/j.dental.2015.06.007
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    ABSTRACT: Fatigue of resin-dentin adhesive bonds is critical to the longevity of resin composite restorations. The objectives were to characterize the fatigue and fatigue crack growth resistance of resin-dentin bonds achieved using two different commercial adhesives and to identify apparent "weak-links". Bonded interface specimens were prepared using Adper Single Bond Plus (SB) or Adper Scotchbond Multi-Purpose (SBMP) adhesives and 3M Z100 resin composite according to the manufacturers' instructions. The stress-life fatigue behavior was evaluated using the twin bonded interface approach and the fatigue crack growth resistance was examined using bonded interface Compact Tension (CT) specimens. Fatigue properties of the interfaces were compared to those of the resin-adhesive, resin composite and coronal dentin. The fatigue strength of the SBMP interface was significantly greater than that achieved by SB (p≤0.01). Both bonded interfaces exhibited significantly lower fatigue strength than that of the Z100 and dentin. Regarding the fatigue crack growth resistance, the stress intensity threshold (ΔKth) of the SB interface was significantly greater (p≤0.01) than that of the SBMP, whereas the ΔKth of the interfaces was more than twice that of the parent adhesives. Collagen fibril reinforcement of the resin adhesive is essential to the fatigue crack growth resistance of resin-dentin bonds. Resin tags that are not well hybridized into the surrounding intertubular dentin and/or poor collagen integrity are detrimental to the bonded interface durability. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
    Dental materials: official publication of the Academy of Dental Materials 07/2015; DOI:10.1016/j.dental.2015.06.011
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    ABSTRACT: A systematic review and meta-analysis were performed on the risk and intensity of postoperative sensitivity (POS) in posterior resin composite restorations bonded with self-etch (SE) and etch-and-rinse (ER) adhesives. A comprehensive search was performed in the MEDLINE via PubMeb, Scopus, Web of Science, LILACS, BBO and Cochrane Library and SIGLE without restrictions. The abstracts of the annual conference of the IADR (1990-2014), unpublished and ongoing trials registry were also searched. Dissertations and theses were searched using the ProQuest Dissertations and Periodicos Capes Theses databases. We included randomized clinical trials that compared the clinical effectiveness of SE and ER used for direct resin composite restorations in permanent dentition of adult patients. The risk/intensity of POS was the primary outcome. The risk of bias tool of the Cochrane Collaboration was used. The meta-analysis was performed on the studies considered 'low' risk of bias. After duplicates removal, 2600 articles were identified but only 29 remained in the qualitative synthesis. Five were considered to be 'high' risk of bias and eleven were considered to be 'unclear' in the key domains, yielding 13 studies for meta-analysis. The overall relative risk of the spontaneous POS was 0.63 (95% CI 0.35 to 1.15), while the stimuli-induced POS was 0.99 (95% CI 0.63 to 1.56). The overall standardized mean difference was 0.08 (95%CI -0.19 to 0.35). No overall effect was revealed in the meta-analyses, meaning that no influence of the ER or SE strategy on POS. The type of adhesive strategy (ER or SE) for posterior resin composite restorations does not influence the risk and intensity of POS. CRD42014006617. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
    Dental materials: official publication of the Academy of Dental Materials 06/2015; DOI:10.1016/j.dental.2015.06.001
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study is to determine if hexaarylbiimidazoles (HABIs) are efficient, visible light-active photoinitiators for thiol-ene systems. We hypothesize that, owing to the reactivity of lophyl radicals with thiols and the necessarily high concentration of thiol in thiol-ene formulations, HABIs will effectively initiate thiol-ene polymerization upon visible light irradiation. UV-vis absorption spectra of photoinitiator solutions were obtained using UV-vis spectroscopy, while EPR spectroscopy was used to confirm radical species generation upon HABI photolysis. Functional group conversions during photopolymerization were monitored using FTIR spectroscopy, and thermomechanical properties were determined using dynamic mechanical analysis. The HABI derivatives investigated exhibit less absorptivity than camphorquinone at 469nm; however, they afford increased sensitivity at this wavelength when compared with bis(2,4,6-trimethylbenzoyl)-phenylphosphineoxide. Photolysis of the investigated HABIs affords lophyl radicals. Affixing hydroxyhexyl functional groups to the HABI core significantly improved solubility. Thiol-ene resins formulated with HABI photoinitiators polymerized rapidly upon irradiation with 469nm. The glass transition temperatures of the thiol-ene resin formulated with a bis(hydroxyhexyl)-functionalized HABI and photopolymerized at room and body temperature were 49.5±0.5°C and 52.2±0.1°C, respectively. Although thiol-enes show promise as continuous phases for composite dental restorative materials, they show poor reactivity with the conventional camphorquinone/tertiary amine photoinitiation system. Conversely, despite their relatively low visible light absorptivity, HABI photoinitiators afford rapid thiol-ene photopolymerization rates. Moreover, minor structural modifications suggest pathways for improved HABI solubility and visible light absorption. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
    Dental materials: official publication of the Academy of Dental Materials 06/2015; DOI:10.1016/j.dental.2015.06.005