Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene (T ROY SOC TROP MED H )

Publisher: Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, Elsevier

Journal description

Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene publishes original, peer-reviewed articles, and invited reviews across a broad range of topics relevant to the Society's goals, including: clinical tropical medicine and case reports, infectious diseases, parasitology and entomology, microbiology and virology, epidemiology, chemotherapy, immunology, public health, including social science. A key objective is to present the results of research that are broadly intelligible to workers from a range of disciplines. We welcome articles on translational research that may impact directly on clinical and public health practice in developing countries and those describing the application of new technologies in tropical medicine.

Current impact factor: 1.93

Impact Factor Rankings

2015 Impact Factor Available summer 2015
2013 / 2014 Impact Factor 1.931
2012 Impact Factor 1.823
2011 Impact Factor 2.162
2010 Impact Factor 2.832
2009 Impact Factor 2.553
2008 Impact Factor 2.062

Impact factor over time

Impact factor
Year

Additional details

5-year impact 2.46
Cited half-life 0.00
Immediacy index 0.47
Eigenfactor 0.01
Article influence 0.76
Website Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine & Hygiene website
Other titles Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene (Online), Trans R Soc Trop Med Hyg
ISSN 1878-3503
OCLC 53915292
Material type Document, Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Elsevier

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Pre-print allowed on any website or open access repository
    • Voluntary deposit by author of authors post-print allowed on authors' personal website, arXiv.org or institutions open scholarly website including Institutional Repository, without embargo, where there is not a policy or mandate
    • Deposit due to Funding Body, Institutional and Governmental policy or mandate only allowed where separate agreement between repository and the publisher exists.
    • Permitted deposit due to Funding Body, Institutional and Governmental policy or mandate, may be required to comply with embargo periods of 12 months to 48 months .
    • Set statement to accompany deposit
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to journal home page or articles' DOI
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Articles in some journals can be made Open Access on payment of additional charge
    • NIH Authors articles will be submitted to PubMed Central after 12 months
    • Publisher last contacted on 18/10/2013
  • Classification
    ​ green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We report the first evidence of sympatric distribution of Plasmodium ovale curtisi and P. ovale wallikeri from India. Fingerprick blood samples were collected from fever cases in district Bastar, Chhattisgarh State for malaria screening by microscopy and PCR. Two cases of mono infection of P. ovale, and a fatal case of cerebral malaria with a mixed infection of P. vivax, P. falciparum and P. ovale were confirmed by PCR. Sequencing analysis revealed the presence of P. ovale curtisi and P. ovale wallikeri. This study highlights the need of molecular diagnosis of malaria cases in forested areas for treatment and control. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.
    Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene 02/2015;
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    ABSTRACT: An estimated 129 million people are infected with urogenital schistosomiasis in sub-Saharan Africa. Current control recommendations endorse mass administration of praziquantel. Health education is an important component of effective schistosomiasis prevention and control, but there has been limited research on its effectiveness. This paper reviews the effectiveness of health education as an intervention in the prevention and control of urogenital schistosomiasis in sub-Saharan Africa. The outcomes of interest were prevalence, incidence or transmission of schistosomiasis, behaviour change associated with infection, or changes in knowledge of the disease. The findings from this review suggest that health education has a beneficial impact on knowledge and understanding of schistosomiasis within the target groups. However, further research is needed due to the poor quality of the included studies. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.
    Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene 02/2015;
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    ABSTRACT: Leptospirosis is an important public health threat in sub-Saharan Africa but little is known regarding the host spectrum and epidemiology of this zoonotic disease. 289 kidney samples from 69 wild, domestic and peri-domestic species in northern Botswana were screened for the presence of Leptospira sp. Renal carriage was widespread among mammals (31.4%, n=11/35 species), birds (27.8%, n=5/18 species) and reptiles (6.3%, n=1/16 species), including several novel species. Leptospiral surveillance is often limited to the usual suspects: rodents and domestic animals. We identify Leptospira in a wide range of African wildlife, suggesting that leptospirosis transmission and persistence may also involve hosts not normally considered. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.
    Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene 02/2015;
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    ABSTRACT: Hydrocoele surgery is the recommended treatment for the common clinical manifestation of lymphatic filariasis in men. This study determined the geographical differences in surgery accessibility, and improvements in the quality of life of patients in Chikwawa district, Malawi. Surgery records from Chikwawa District Hospital (CDH), between 2008 and 2013, were used to map surgery rates by village, spatial dependence by census enumeration area and relationship of distance (kilometres) to CDH. A subset of patients were selected to quantify and compare their physical and socio-economic well-being and level of disability pre- and post-surgery using a standardised questionnaire. A total of 476 hydrocoele surgical cases were identified with 260 cases geo-referenced and mapped. A significant negative relationship between village-level surgery rates and distance to CDH (r=-0.137; 95% CI -0.47 to -0.26) was found, and clusters of enumeration areas with high surgery rates identified around the CDH. Significant improvements in patients' ability to walk and work were found and the overall level of disability was reduced post-surgery. Hydrocoele surgery positively impacted on patients, improving their physical and socio-economic output. Surgical services need to scale-up and expand to reach cases that have less access to the best treatment currently available. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.
    Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene 02/2015;
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    ABSTRACT: In 2009, the WHO Special Programme for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases (TDR) and the International Development Research Centre (IDRC) launched a call for innovative community-based ecosystem management research projects for dengue and Chagas disease prevention in low and middle income countries in Latin America and the Caribbean. Eight research institutions were selected. The outputs of these projects led to a better understanding of the interaction between ecological, biological, social and economic (eco-bio-social) determinants of dengue and Chagas disease in Latin America and the Caribbean. Both diseases are considered highly relevant in the regional health agendas. © World Health Organization 2015. The World Health Organization has granted Oxford University Press permission for the reproduction of this article.
    Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene 02/2015; 109(2):89-90.
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    ABSTRACT: Long-lasting insecticide-treated net (LLIN) window and door curtains alone or in combination with LLIN water container covers were analysed regarding effectiveness in reducing dengue vector density, and feasibility of the intervention. A cluster randomised trial was conducted in an urban area of Colombia comparing 10 randomly selected control and 10 intervention clusters. In control clusters, routine vector control activities were performed. The intervention delivered first, LLIN curtains (from July to August 2013) and secondly, water container covers (from October to March 2014). Cross-sectional entomological surveys were carried out at baseline (February 2013 to June 2013), 9 weeks after the first intervention (August to October 2013), and 4-6 weeks after the second intervention (March to April 2014). Curtains were installed in 922 households and water container covers in 303 households. The Breteau index (BI) fell from 14 to 6 in the intervention group and from 8 to 5 in the control group. The additional intervention with LLIN covers for water containers showed a significant reduction in pupae per person index (PPI) (p=0.01). In the intervention group, the PPI index showed a clear decline of 71% compared with 25% in the control group. Costs were high but options for cost savings were identified. Short term impact evaluation indicates that the intervention package can reduce dengue vector density but sustained effect will depend on multiple factors. © The author 2015. The World Health Organization has granted Oxford University Press permission for the reproduction of this article.
    Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene 02/2015; 109(2):116-25.
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    ABSTRACT: This project investigates the effectiveness and feasibility of scaling-up an eco-bio-social approach for implementing an integrated community-based approach for dengue prevention in comparison with existing insecticide-based and emerging biolarvicide-based programs in an endemic setting in Machala, Ecuador. An integrated intervention strategy (IIS) for dengue prevention (an elementary school-based dengue education program, and clean patio and safe container program) was implemented in 10 intervention clusters from November 2012 to November 2013 using a randomized controlled cluster trial design (20 clusters: 10 intervention, 10 control; 100 households per cluster with 1986 total households). Current existing dengue prevention programs served as the control treatment in comparison clusters. Pupa per person index (PPI) is used as the main outcome measure. Particular attention was paid to social mobilization and empowerment with IIS. Overall, IIS was successful in reducing PPI levels in intervention communities versus control clusters, with intervention clusters in the six paired clusters that followed the study design experiencing a greater reduction of PPI compared to controls (2.2 OR, 95% CI: 1.2 to 4.7). Analysis of individual cases demonstrates that consideration for contexualizing programs and strategies to local neighborhoods can be very effective in reducing PPI for dengue transmission risk reduction. In the rapidly evolving political climate for dengue control in Ecuador, integration of successful social mobilization and empowerment strategies with existing and emerging biolarvicide-based government dengue prevention and control programs is promising in reducing PPI and dengue transmission risk in southern coastal communities like Machala. However, more profound analysis of social determination of health is called for to assess sustainability prospects. © The author 2015. The World Health Organization has granted Oxford University Press permission for the reproduction of this article.
    Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene 02/2015; 109(2):126-33.
  • Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene 02/2015; 109(2):85-8.
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    ABSTRACT: TB remains a very significant global health burden. There is an urgent need for better tools for TB control, which include an effective vaccine. Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG), the currently licensed vaccine, confers highly variable protection against pulmonary TB, the main source of TB transmission. Replacing BCG completely or boosting BCG with another vaccine are the two current strategies for TB vaccine development. Delivering a vaccine by aerosol represents a way to match the route of vaccination to the route of infection. This route of immunisation offers not only the scientific advantage of delivering the vaccine directly to the respiratory mucosa, but also practical and logistical advantages. This review summarises the state of current TB vaccine candidates in the pipeline, reviews current progress in aerosol administration of vaccines in general and evaluates the potential for TB vaccine candidates to be administered by the aerosol route. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.
    Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene 01/2015;
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    ABSTRACT: Cerebral malaria (CM) is the most common and severe acute neurological manifestation of Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Children living in malaria-endemic areas of sub-Saharan Africa are at the highest risk of developing CM, and the long-term effect of CM on neurological function is uncertain. We conducted a meta-analysis to quantitatively assess the association between CM and development of long-term neurological impairment. We performed a systematic search through PubMed (including MEDLINE; 1946 to December 2014) and EMBASE (1974 to January 2015) to identify relevant articles. Eligible studies assessed the association between CM and neurological sequelae and were included if they met the criteria allowing a complete extraction of data. Eight studies were included in the final analysis, and in total, 2005 individuals were analysed (cases: n=842, controls: n=1163), most of whom were children. CM was associated with an increased risk of epilepsy (OR 4.68, 95% CI 2.52-8.70), an increased risk of intelligence quotient (IQ) impairment (OR 4.72, 95% CI 0.78-28.49), an increased risk of neurodisabilities (OR 16.16, 95% CI 1.34-195.45), and an increased risk of behavioural disorder (OR 8.47, 95% CI 2.75-26.04). Our findings suggest that children who survive CM are at increased risk of long-term neurological adverse outcome, including epilepsy. This may present a major public health problem in terms of education and development in malaria-endemic areas. Measures to avoid neurological morbidity are warranted. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.
    Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene 01/2015;
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    ABSTRACT: It is generally assumed that hookworm infections in humans are caused by Necator americanus and Ancylostoma duodenale. However, previous studies have also reported the presence of the animal hookworm A. ceylanicum in human stools. We determined hookworm infections in children in a tribal community in Tamil Nadu, India, using a semi-nested PCR-RFLP approach. The results indicate that human species account for a majority of the hookworm infections (N. americanus 39/41 [95%]; A. duodenale 6/41 [15%]), whereas the animal hookworm A. ceylanicum only accounts for a minority of the infections (5%; 2/41). The results emphasize the need to consider zoonotic ancylostomiasis while developing strategies to control hookworm infections. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.
    Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene 01/2015;
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    ABSTRACT: Long-lasting insecticidal net screens (LLIS) fitted to domestic windows and doors in combination with targeted treatment (TT) of the most productive Aedes aegypti breeding sites were evaluated for their impact on dengue vector indices in a cluster-randomised trial in Mexico between 2011 and 2013. Sequentially over 2 years, LLIS and TT were deployed in 10 treatment clusters (100 houses/cluster) and followed up over 24 months. Cross-sectional surveys quantified infestations of adult mosquitoes, immature stages at baseline (pre-intervention) and in four post-intervention samples at 6-monthly intervals. Identical surveys were carried out in 10 control clusters that received no treatment. LLIS clusters had significantly lower infestations compared to control clusters at 5 and 12 months after installation, as measured by adult (male and female) and pupal-based vector indices. After addition of TT to the intervention houses in intervention clusters, indices remained significantly lower in the treated clusters until 18 (immature and adult stage indices) and 24 months (adult indices only) post-intervention. These safe, simple affordable vector control tools were well-accepted by study participants and are potentially suitable in many regions at risk from dengue worldwide
    Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene 01/2015; 109(2):106-115.
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    ABSTRACT: In 2003, a study in Mali showed that 87% of episodes of uncomplicated malaria were first treated at home. We investigated whether treatment-seeking patterns in Mali had changed 10 years later. In 2013, we repeated the retrospective treatment-outcome study on 400 children with presumed malaria in the same area. Most children with reported uncomplicated malaria were still first treated at home (76% [196/258] in 2013 vs 85% in 2003; p=0.006), rather than in modern health centres (20% [52/258] in 2013 vs 12% in 2003; p=0.01). Overall, 58% of children with uncomplicated malaria were treated with herbal medicine alone, a significant increase from 24% 10 years earlier (p<0.001). This was associated with an increase in use of Argemone mexicana decoction from 8% to 26% (p<0.001), with a reported cure or improvement in 100% of cases among those aged >5 years. For severe malaria, first treatment was sought less often from a traditional healer compared with 10 years earlier (4% vs 32%; p<0.001) and more often from a modern health centre (29% vs 17%; p=0.04). Two trends that emerged are that there is a greater use of modern health facilities for treatment of severe malaria, and a greater use of traditional medicine alone for treatment of uncomplicated malaria. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.
    Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene 01/2015; 109(3).