Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene (T ROY SOC TROP MED H)

Publisher: Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, Oxford University Press (OUP)

Journal description

Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene publishes original, peer-reviewed articles, and invited reviews across a broad range of topics relevant to the Society's goals, including: clinical tropical medicine and case reports, infectious diseases, parasitology and entomology, microbiology and virology, epidemiology, chemotherapy, immunology, public health, including social science. A key objective is to present the results of research that are broadly intelligible to workers from a range of disciplines. We welcome articles on translational research that may impact directly on clinical and public health practice in developing countries and those describing the application of new technologies in tropical medicine.

Current impact factor: 1.93

Impact Factor Rankings

2015 Impact Factor Available summer 2015
2013 / 2014 Impact Factor 1.931
2012 Impact Factor 1.823
2011 Impact Factor 2.162
2010 Impact Factor 2.832
2009 Impact Factor 2.553
2008 Impact Factor 2.062

Impact factor over time

Impact factor
Year

Additional details

5-year impact 2.46
Cited half-life 0.00
Immediacy index 0.47
Eigenfactor 0.01
Article influence 0.76
Website Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine & Hygiene website
Other titles Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene (Online), Trans R Soc Trop Med Hyg
ISSN 1878-3503
OCLC 53915292
Material type Document, Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Oxford University Press (OUP)

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author cannot archive a post-print version
  • Restrictions
    • 12 months embargo
  • Conditions
    • Pre-print can only be posted prior to acceptance
    • Pre-print must be accompanied by set statement (see link)
    • Pre-print must not be replaced with post-print, instead a link to published version with amended set statement should be made
    • Pre-print on author's personal website, employer website, free public server or pre-prints in subject area
    • Post-print in Institutional repositories or Central repositories
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Set phrase to accompany archived copy (see policy)
    • Eligible authors may deposit in OpenDepot
    • The publisher will deposit in PubMed Central on behalf of NIH authors
    • Publisher last contacted on 19/02/2015
    • This policy is an exception to the default policies of 'Oxford University Press (OUP)'
  • Classification
    ​ yellow

Publications in this journal

  • Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene 04/2015; 109(4):229-230. DOI:10.1093/trstmh/trv010
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    ABSTRACT: Sentinel toys are increasingly used as a method of assessing young children's exposure to faecal pathogens in households in low-income settings. However, there is no consensus on the suitability of different approaches. We evaluated three types of toy balls with different surfaces (plastic, rubber, urethane) in the laboratory to compare the uptake of faecal indicator bacteria (Escherichia coli) on their surface. We performed bacteria survival analysis under different environmental conditions and tested laboratory methods for bacteria removal and recovery. In a field study we distributed sterile urethane balls to children <5 from 360 households in rural India. After 24 hours, we collected and rinsed the toys in sterile water, assayed for thermotolerant coliforms (TTC) and explored associations between the level of contamination and household characteristics. In the laboratory, urethane foam balls took up more indicator bacteria than the other balls. Bacteria recovery did not differ based on mechanic vs no agitation. Higher temperatures and moisture levels increased bacterial yield. In the field, the only factor associated with a decreased recovery of TTC from the balls was having a soil (unpaved) floor. Sentinel toys may be an effective tool for assessing young children's exposure to faecal pathogens. However, even using methods designed to increase bacterial recovery, limited sensitivity may require larger sample sizes. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.
    Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene 03/2015; DOI:10.1093/trstmh/trv023
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    ABSTRACT: Adverse drug reactions are a major concern with zidovudine/stavudine treatment regimens. The less toxic tenofovir regimen is an alternative, but is seldom considered due to the higher costs. This study compared adverse drug reactions and other clinical outcomes resulting from the use of these two treatment regimens in India. Baseline, clinical characteristics and follow-up outcomes were collected by chart reviews of HIV-positive adults and compared using univariate/multivariate analysis, with and without propensity score adjustments. Data were collected from 129 and 92 patients on zidovudine (with lamivudine and nevirapine) and tenofovir (with emtricitabine and efavirenz) regimens, respectively. Compared to patients receiving the zidovudine regimen, patients receiving the tenofovir regimen had fewer adverse drug reactions (47%, 61/129 vs 11%, 10/92; p<0.01), requiring fewer regimen changes (36%, 47/129 vs 3%, 3/92; p0.01). With the propensity score, the zidovudine regimen had 8 times more adverse drug reactions (p<0.01). Opportunistic infections were similar between regimens without propensity score, while the zidovudine regimen had 1.2 times (p=0.63) more opportunistic infections with propensity score. Patients on the tenofovir regimen gained more weight. Increase in CD4 levels and treatment adherence (>95%) was similar across regimens. Patients on a tenofovir regimen have better clinical outcomes and improved general health than patients on the zidovudine regimen. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.
    Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene 03/2015; DOI:10.1093/trstmh/trv016
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    ABSTRACT: Failure of first-line antiretroviral therapy (ART) results in high morbidity and mortality. We identified the predictors of immunological failure and suboptimal CD4 testing among adult people living with HIV (PLHIV) initiated on first-line ART. The cohort of PLHIV aged ≥15 years initiated on first-line ART in Hyderabad city, Andhra Pradesh state in 2008 was followed-up until 31 December 2011 or until death and/or lost to follow-up (LFU). We estimated cumulative incidence of immunological failure. We explored socio-demographic, clinical, pharmacological and immunological factors to identify the predictors of immunological failure and determinants of suboptimal CD4 testing (<2 tests/year). Amongst the 1431 PLHIV, 275 (19.2%) died and 263 (18.4%) were LFU. Of the remaining 893 (62.3%) patients on follow-up, 193 (21.6%) experienced immunological failure; these patients were more likely to be males, illiterate, with a history of pulmonary TB while on ART, and taking stavudine-based regimen. Incidence of suboptimal testing ranged between 41 and 60% over four years of follow-up. Suboptimal CD4 testing among PLHIV was associated with history of TB prior to initiation of ART and stage 3 and 4 of HIV disease at enrollment. There was low immunological failure rate but high incidence of suboptimal CD4 testing. The ART centre staff needs to be more vigilant about six-monthly CD4 testing for timely detection of immunological failure and appropriate case management. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.
    Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene 03/2015; DOI:10.1093/trstmh/trv018
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    ABSTRACT: Concerted efforts to eliminate lymphatic filariasis worldwide have registered success; multiple rounds of mass drug administration have led to the interruption of transmission in many previously endemic areas. However, the management of patients with established clinical disease (e.g., lymphoedema, hydrocoele and acute dermatolymphangioadenitis) has not been addressed sufficiently. Two recent studies from Malawi underscore the need for accurate epidemiological and clinical data, and comprehensive morbidity assessments across various domains of daily life. Addressing these issues will guide the implementation of programmes to improve access to treatment and disability prevention for affected individuals in Malawi and beyond. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.
    Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene 03/2015; DOI:10.1093/trstmh/trv022
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    ABSTRACT: Ongoing surveillance of enteric pathogens of public health significance amongst casual food sellers is undertaken in many resource-limited countries. We report the results of a survey in Kiang West province, The Gambia and provide an exemplar methodology for such surveys in resource-limited laboratories. Unpreserved, unrefrigerated stool samples were subjected to Salmonella, Shigella and agar plate culture for rhabditoid nematodes. Direct microscopy, formalin-ethyl acetate concentration and iron-hematoxylin staining was performed later, following preservation. Of 128 specimens received, no Shigella spp. was recovered, while four serovars of non-typhoidal Salmonella enterica, including Chandans, were isolated. Pathogenic parasitic infections were; Necator americanus 10/128 (7.8%), Strongyloides stercoralis 3/128 (2.8%), Blastocystis species 45/128 (35.1%), Entamoeba histolytica complex 19/128 (14.8%) and Giardia intestinalis 4/128 (3.1%). A single case each of Hymenolepis diminuta and S. mansoni infection were detected. In one participant, myxozoan spores identical to those of Myxobolus species, were found. Rare parasitoses and serovars of Salmonella enterica may occur relatively commonly in rural Africa. This paper describes intestinal pathogens found in a cohort of food sellers in such this setting. Furthermore, it describes two parasites rarely recovered from humans and demonstrates the need for methods other than microscopy to detect S. stercoralis infections. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.
    Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene 03/2015; DOI:10.1093/trstmh/trv020
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    ABSTRACT: Malaria control is reliant upon effective, programmatic-scale, anti-vector interventions. The widespread distribution of pyrethroid-treated bednets in sub-Saharan Africa has been a driver of morbidity and mortality reductions over the last decade. Unfortunately resistance to insecticides, and to pyrethroids in particular, is increasingly common in Anopheles malaria vectors, and is a major threat to continued control and future elimination. Here we argue that current methods to diagnose resistance often have limited utility and should be augmented or even partially-replaced by wider application of DNA markers. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.
    Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene 03/2015; DOI:10.1093/trstmh/trv017
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    ABSTRACT: Knowledge about genital Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) infections in the Pacific is limited. In this study we investigated CT infection in Samoan women. We recruited women having unprotected sex aged 18 to 29 years from 41 Samoan villages. They completed a questionnaire and provided a urine sample for CT testing by PCR. Associations between CT infection and possible risk factors were explored using logistic regression. Two hundred and thirty-nine women were recruited; 86 (36.0%; weighted estimate of prevalence: 41.9%; 95% CI 33.4-50.5%) were positive for CT infection. A higher proportion of women aged 18 to 24 were positive (54/145; 37.2%) than those aged 25 to 29 (32/94; 34.0%; p=0.20). Being single (OR 1.92; 95% CI 1.02-3.63) and having two or more lifetime sexual partners (OR 3.02; 95% CI 1.19-7.67) were associated with CT infection; 27.6% of those with one lifetime partner were positive. Participants who had a previous pregnancy were less likely to be positive (OR 0.49; 95% CI 0.27-0.87). Primiparous and multiparous women were less likely to be positive than nulliparous women (OR 0.54; 95% CI 0.30-0.99 and OR 0.46; 95% CI 0.24-0.89, respectively). The prevalence of CT infection in these Samoan women is very high. Further studies, including investigating the prevalence of CT infection in men, and strategies for sustainable control are needed. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.
    Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene 03/2015; DOI:10.1093/trstmh/trv014
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    ABSTRACT: We report the first evidence of sympatric distribution of Plasmodium ovale curtisi and P. ovale wallikeri from India. Fingerprick blood samples were collected from fever cases in district Bastar, Chhattisgarh State for malaria screening by microscopy and PCR. Two cases of mono infection of P. ovale, and a fatal case of cerebral malaria with a mixed infection of P. vivax, P. falciparum and P. ovale were confirmed by PCR. Sequencing analysis revealed the presence of P. ovale curtisi and P. ovale wallikeri. This study highlights the need of molecular diagnosis of malaria cases in forested areas for treatment and control. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.
    Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene 02/2015; DOI:10.1093/trstmh/trv015
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    ABSTRACT: An estimated 129 million people are infected with urogenital schistosomiasis in sub-Saharan Africa. Current control recommendations endorse mass administration of praziquantel. Health education is an important component of effective schistosomiasis prevention and control, but there has been limited research on its effectiveness. This paper reviews the effectiveness of health education as an intervention in the prevention and control of urogenital schistosomiasis in sub-Saharan Africa. The outcomes of interest were prevalence, incidence or transmission of schistosomiasis, behaviour change associated with infection, or changes in knowledge of the disease. The findings from this review suggest that health education has a beneficial impact on knowledge and understanding of schistosomiasis within the target groups. However, further research is needed due to the poor quality of the included studies. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.
    Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene 02/2015; DOI:10.1093/trstmh/trv008
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    ABSTRACT: Hydrocoele surgery is the recommended treatment for the common clinical manifestation of lymphatic filariasis in men. This study determined the geographical differences in surgery accessibility, and improvements in the quality of life of patients in Chikwawa district, Malawi. Surgery records from Chikwawa District Hospital (CDH), between 2008 and 2013, were used to map surgery rates by village, spatial dependence by census enumeration area and relationship of distance (kilometres) to CDH. A subset of patients were selected to quantify and compare their physical and socio-economic well-being and level of disability pre- and post-surgery using a standardised questionnaire. A total of 476 hydrocoele surgical cases were identified with 260 cases geo-referenced and mapped. A significant negative relationship between village-level surgery rates and distance to CDH (r=-0.137; 95% CI -0.47 to -0.26) was found, and clusters of enumeration areas with high surgery rates identified around the CDH. Significant improvements in patients' ability to walk and work were found and the overall level of disability was reduced post-surgery. Hydrocoele surgery positively impacted on patients, improving their physical and socio-economic output. Surgical services need to scale-up and expand to reach cases that have less access to the best treatment currently available. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.
    Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene 02/2015; 109(4). DOI:10.1093/trstmh/trv009
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    ABSTRACT: In 2009, the WHO Special Programme for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases (TDR) and the International Development Research Centre (IDRC) launched a call for innovative community-based ecosystem management research projects for dengue and Chagas disease prevention in low and middle income countries in Latin America and the Caribbean. Eight research institutions were selected. The outputs of these projects led to a better understanding of the interaction between ecological, biological, social and economic (eco-bio-social) determinants of dengue and Chagas disease in Latin America and the Caribbean. Both diseases are considered highly relevant in the regional health agendas. © World Health Organization 2015. The World Health Organization has granted Oxford University Press permission for the reproduction of this article.
    Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene 02/2015; 109(2):89-90. DOI:10.1093/trstmh/tru201
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    ABSTRACT: Long-lasting insecticide-treated net (LLIN) window and door curtains alone or in combination with LLIN water container covers were analysed regarding effectiveness in reducing dengue vector density, and feasibility of the intervention. A cluster randomised trial was conducted in an urban area of Colombia comparing 10 randomly selected control and 10 intervention clusters. In control clusters, routine vector control activities were performed. The intervention delivered first, LLIN curtains (from July to August 2013) and secondly, water container covers (from October to March 2014). Cross-sectional entomological surveys were carried out at baseline (February 2013 to June 2013), 9 weeks after the first intervention (August to October 2013), and 4-6 weeks after the second intervention (March to April 2014). Curtains were installed in 922 households and water container covers in 303 households. The Breteau index (BI) fell from 14 to 6 in the intervention group and from 8 to 5 in the control group. The additional intervention with LLIN covers for water containers showed a significant reduction in pupae per person index (PPI) (p=0.01). In the intervention group, the PPI index showed a clear decline of 71% compared with 25% in the control group. Costs were high but options for cost savings were identified. Short term impact evaluation indicates that the intervention package can reduce dengue vector density but sustained effect will depend on multiple factors. © The author 2015. The World Health Organization has granted Oxford University Press permission for the reproduction of this article.
    Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene 02/2015; 109(2):116-25. DOI:10.1093/trstmh/tru208