Educational Assessment Evaluation and Accountability

Publisher: Springer (Firm), Springer Verlag

Description

  • Impact factor
    0.69
  • 5-year impact
    0.69
  • Cited half-life
    0.00
  • Immediacy index
    0.06
  • Eigenfactor
    0.00
  • Article influence
    0.18
  • Other titles
    Educational assessment, evaluation and accountability
  • ISSN
    1874-8597
  • OCLC
    316864809
  • Material type
    Periodical
  • Document type
    Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Springer Verlag

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  • Post-print
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    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • On author's website or institutional repository
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    • Must link to publisher version
    • Set phrase to accompany link to published version (The original publication is available at www.springerlink.com)
    • Articles in some journals can be made Open Access on payment of additional charge
  • Classification
    ​ green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This paper introduces an empirical study that examines how teachers evaluate pupils’ responses. The study draws on research undertaken at four secondary schools in the Czech Republic. It transpires that feedback has a stable position in the structure of communication; however, it is used only to verify pupils’ responses and not to elaborate them. An important feature of feedback is its implicitness and near-zero content value resulting from the teachers’ preferences to avoid explicit evaluative comments. This type of feedback is not in accordance with the concepts of dialogical education that currently dominate the field of the theory of educational communication.
    Educational Assessment Evaluation and Accountability 03/2014; 24(3).
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    ABSTRACT: The readiness and expectations questionnaire (REQ) assesses first-year students’ expectations and preparedness for their first year in university. This measurement instrument is useful for educational policy and curriculum development; it can also be used to predict the outcomes of the first year of college. This instrument was initially developed to compare students enrolled in programs in the Netherlands and New Zealand, with predominant populations of domestic students. However, the Bologna process and globalisation trends also have increased the availability of international degree programmes. This raised the question whether the REQ can be used to compare groups of international students. Therefore, this article aims to assess the cross-cultural measurement equivalence of the REQ in international bachelor degree programmes in economics and business in a Dutch university, taught in English. The results indicate that not all aspects of the instrument achieve measurement equivalence, but most of its scales, with some adaptations, can evaluate students’ expectations and preparedness and thus encourage a better match between student and institution.
    Educational Assessment Evaluation and Accountability 05/2013; 25(2):115 - 130.
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    ABSTRACT: With the implementation of teacher performance pay in 2009 in China, teacher performance evaluation has become a heated topic. This research study follows up on two previous studies of teacher evaluation in China and continues the dialog by analyzing the latest trends in the context of teacher performance pay. There were two sources of information for this article: academic journal articles and teacher evaluation practices of two schools from Beijing. Seven themes were derived from a content analysis of the academic journal articles: (a) studies on teacher evaluation within the context of curriculum reform, (b) methods of teacher evaluation, (c) studies of miscellaneous responses, (d) studies on developmental teacher evaluation, (e) studies on teacher performance evaluation, (f) studies on teacher effectiveness, and (g) philosophical thoughts of teacher evaluation. The two cases of teacher evaluation practices revealed some changes since the implementation of teacher performance pay, such as a more comprehensive teacher evaluation system.
    Educational Assessment Evaluation and Accountability 01/2013; 25(3).
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    ABSTRACT: While a lot has been written regarding the changing management and governance arrangements in higher education, less is known about how this progression relates to quality in higher education. The purpose of this article is to describe the context of governance in Portuguese higher education institutions and how institutional governance arrangements impact on quality and quality assurance mechanisms of higher education. The study is based on four institutional cases studies, comprising two universities and two polytechnic institutions. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with senior managers, middle managers, academics and students from Arts and Engineering, and documentary analysis was undertaken. The main findings show that national and institutional features of governance and management may influence the implementation of quality policy and procedures, and indeed quality improvement. The different institutional actors seem to be aware of the dynamic nature of the equilibrium between positive and negative impacts and recognise the need for checks and balances in the governance and management structures of higher education institutions, especially between collegial and managerial facets.
    Educational Assessment Evaluation and Accountability 01/2013;
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    Educational Assessment Evaluation and Accountability 01/2013; 25(3).
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    ABSTRACT: Given the international need to improve student learning, there is nothing more important than classroom teachers. Obtaining a deeper understanding of effective classrooms is a priority if educational reform efforts are to succeed in any educational system around the world. In the last decade, educational researchers have expanded the knowledge base about the impact of teachers, but far less is known about what effective teachers do that make such a positive difference. This investigation focuses on the relationship between attributes of effective teaching, as perceived by both more and less effective teachers, and fourth grade reading achievement results of their students. This investigation used value-added modeling methods as the first step for identifying the more and less effective fourth grade teachers (N = 261) and their students (N = 6,962). Survey research methods were used to compare the perceptions about characteristics of effective teaching for teachers previously identified—in the value-added model—as (a) more effective and (b) less effective. Findings indicated that the more effective teachers value classroom management and organization as the number one characteristic of effective teaching; that, in turn, enables the more effective teachers to focus classroom time on student learning. Implications for theory and practice are discussed.
    Educational Assessment Evaluation and Accountability 01/2013; 25(3).
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    ABSTRACT: This paper developed a Democratic Classroom Survey to measure students’ perceived democratic environment of the classroom. Perceived democratic environment is one of the most important variables for understanding classroom activity and indeed any type of group activity, but actually measuring perceptions in an objective manner has been problematic. We developed the survey items from both a strong theoretical and a practical perspective, with the contention that Pleasing Authority/External Motivation, Performance Orientation, Cooperation/Collaboration, Integrated Activity, and Goals before Trust/Inter-subjective would be important factors for measuring individual students’ perceptions of the classroom along an authoritarian/democratic continuum. Factor analyses (Exploratory followed by Confirmatory analyses) confirmed the structure of the hypothesized subscales, and the good model fit indicated that the survey is valid. Also, correlation analyses with Classroom Community Scale showed good construct validity. Finally, reliability tests for each subscale and split-half reliability tests showed that the survey is a reliable tool to use in college classrooms. Implications and future directions are discussed.
    Educational Assessment Evaluation and Accountability 01/2013;
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    ABSTRACT: Many studies point to potential unintended consequences of accountability systems such as when schools narrow their teaching to fixate on tested subjects. As a result, some states and districts in the USA have complemented the federal test-based accountability system with additional measures of educational practices to hold schools accountable on multiple measures. To explore the consequences of such systems, this study focuses on the responses of nine elementary schools to a multiple-measure accountability system in New York City, including high-stakes tests and quality reviews. While some schools showed broader improvement efforts, results suggest the state test remains the dominant measure in driving responses of schools, and in some cases, the quality review further reinforces the schools' focus on the test.
    Educational Assessment Evaluation and Accountability 01/2013; 25(4).
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    ABSTRACT: Teacher education institutions conduct information and communications technology (ICT) courses to prepare preservice teachers (or initial teacher education candidates) to support their teaching practice with appropriate ICT tools. ICT course evaluations based on preservice teachers’ perception of course experiences are limited in indicating the kinds of ICT integration knowledge or technological pedagogical content knowledge (TPACK) preservice teachers have gained throughout the course. Preservice teachers’ ICT course experiences was found to influence their intentions to integrate ICT but its influence on their TPACK perceptions, if better understood, can inform teacher education institutions about the design of ICT courses. This study describes the design and validation of an ICT course evaluation instrument that examines preservice teachers’ perceptions of ICT course experiences and TPACK. Hierarchical regression analysis was performed on survey results collected from a graduating cohort of 869 Singapore preservice teachers who had undergone a compulsory ICT course during their teacher training program. These preservice teachers were being prepared to teach the different subject areas at primary, secondary, and junior colleges (or postsecondary institutions for 17–19 year olds) in Singapore. The regression model showed that preservice teachers’ perceived TPACK was first influenced by their perceptions of course experiences that supported the development of intermediary TPACK knowledge components such as technological knowledge and technological pedagogical knowledge. The methodological implications for the design of ICT course evaluation surveys and the practical applications of survey results to the refinement of ICT course curriculum are discussed.
    Educational Assessment Evaluation and Accountability 01/2013;
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    ABSTRACT: The Performance Assessment for California Teachers (PACT) is an authentic tool for evaluating prospective teachers by examining their abilities to plan, teach, assess, and reflect on instruction in actual classroom practice. The PACT seeks both to measure and develop teacher effectiveness, and this study of its predictive and consequential validity provides information on how well it achieves these goals. The research finds that teacher candidates’ PACT scores are significant predictors of their later teaching effectiveness as measured by their students’ achievement gains in both English language arts (ELA) and mathematics. Several subscales of the PACT are also influential in predicting later effectiveness: These include planning, assessment, and academic language development in ELA, and assessment and reflection in mathematics. In addition, large majorities of PACT candidates report that they acquired additional knowledge and skills for teaching by virtue of completing the assessment. Candidates’ feelings that they learned from the assessment were the strongest when they also felt well-supported by their program in learning to teach and in completing the assessment process.
    Educational Assessment Evaluation and Accountability 01/2013; 25(3).
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to develop a richer understanding of teacher effectiveness through cross-cultural analyses of the practices and beliefs of selected China and US teachers who have received national awards for their teaching. This study was based upon a phenomenological design that used semi-structured interviews, classroom observations, and artifacts for data generation/collection. Sixteen China teachers and 16 US teachers participated in this study. This study revealed similarities and differences between US teachers and China teachers in their patterns of instructional practices and professional thinking. The major similarities found between them were (a) using a variety of instructional activities which spanned across different cognitive levels, (b) being opportunistic planners to maximize meaningful student learning, (c) having high student engagement, (d) presenting effective classroom management skills, and (e) maintaining a learning environment that was conducive to optimal learning. Primary differences between US and China teachers’ classrooms included the types of instructional activities used and their beliefs and practices in the areas of (a) instructional planning, (b) differentiation, (c) assessment, (d) classroom management, (e) relationships with students and parents, and (f) professional development.
    Educational Assessment Evaluation and Accountability 01/2013; 25(3).
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to examine the connections between national culture and student achievement. Using Hofstede’s six cultural dimensions and the two dimensions from the World Values survey, we conducted multiple regressions to determine the most significant predictors of student achievement as measured by the 2009 Program for International Student Assessment in reading, mathematics, and science. Our analyses found that the most significant predictors of student achievement on all three student outcome included the following cultural dimensions based on two different frameworks: (1) a culture’s focus on fostering long-term orientation to include emphasis on perseverance to achieve future-oriented results and (2) a culture’s focus on secular-rational values vs. traditional values. In addition, findings indicate that when mapped geographically, similar patterns emerge among the two cultural dimensions.
    Educational Assessment Evaluation and Accountability 01/2013; 25(3).
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    ABSTRACT: This study addressed the topic of job specifications and school characteristics since there is a shortage of quality AP applicants in high-stakes accountability environments. It is important to learn about allocation of duties from educational administrators with on-the-job experience as well as to learn why current APs would consider applying for other AP positions. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of job attributes (instruction, discipline), school level (elementary, middle, high), and school achievement (in-need-of-assistance, progressing, meets goal) on applicant’s rating of an AP position. This research study used an experimental design. A main effect for job attributes indicated that instruction was significantly higher than discipline when attracting assistant principals. Implications for practice and research are discussed. KeywordsAssistant principals–Recruitment–School districts–Urban education–Job applicants–Accountability–High stakes tests
    Educational Assessment Evaluation and Accountability 01/2011; 23(2):131-142.
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    ABSTRACT: This article refers to a study on how the school principal engaged in the process after a school self-evaluation. The study examined how two primary schools followed up the evaluation. Although they both used the same evaluation tool, the schools’ understanding and application of results differed greatly. This paper describes and discusses the post evaluation process based on Erik Johnsen’s ideal leadership model (2002). It argues that formal leadership makes a difference in the use of the school evaluation for development by providing a proper context for knowledge sharing and reflection. This involves the prioritization and facilitation of individual and organisational reflection for learning, as well as transformation of knowledge through interaction across the whole school.
    Educational Assessment Evaluation and Accountability 01/2011; 23(4).
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    ABSTRACT: Traditionally political knowledge was regarded as an important potential outcome for civic education efforts. Most of the currently available research, however, tends to focus on non-cognitive goals, despite the fact that studies repeatedly have shown that political knowledge is an important resource for enlightened and engaged citizenship. In this article, we investigate whether civic education efforts at school contribute to political knowledge levels. The analysis is based on the Belgian Political Panel Survey, a 2year panel study among 2,988 Belgian late adolescents. The analysis shows that experiences with group projects at school contribute significantly to political knowledge levels 2years later on. Furthermore, we can observe an interaction effect as those who are already most knowledgeable about politics, gain most from these group projects. Classes about politics, on the other hand, did not have an effect on knowledge levels. In the discussion, it is argued that civic education can have strong cognitive effects, but that these effects are not always related to classical civic education efforts and we discussion the policy implication for civic education. KeywordsCivic education–Political knowledge–Panel research–Belgium–Adolescents
    Educational Assessment Evaluation and Accountability 01/2011; 23(4):321-339.
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    ABSTRACT: The central aim of standardized exit exams is to motivate students and teachers to work harder on critical subject matters and thus increase student achievement. However, the effects of the implementation of central exams on student motivation have not been analyzed in a longitudinal section until now. In the present study, the consequences of implementing central exams in the German states Bremen and Hesse on student attributions after the exams have been analyzed. We expected an increase in attributions to effort, teaching and luck, caused by the change in examination systems in Bremen advanced courses from 2007 to 2008. Differential results were expected for students perceiving themselves successful or not successful respectively. As a control, advanced courses in Bremen were compared to those in Hesse that did not pass through a change in examination systems at this time. The results point to an increase of attributions to effort and teaching in the total group, but none of attributions to luck. Additionally, as hypothesized, the change in attributions to effort occurred only for perceived successful and a change in attribution to teaching was found mainly for perceived unsuccessful students. The outcomes are interpreted and consequences for further studies are formulated. KeywordsAttributions–Central exit exams–Students–Motivation
    Educational Assessment Evaluation and Accountability 01/2011; 23(3):223-241.
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    ABSTRACT: The article is based on an international comparative study in seven European countries, in which informal learning for active citizenship at school was explored by means of in depth case studies. Active citizenship is being recognized as an important goal of education and school pedagogy in an increasing number of countries. After defining the key terms “informal learning at school” and “active citizenship” the conceptual framework on which the study was based is introduced. Next, the most important outcomes of the study are summarized, in terms of core issues that showed varied implementation across countries. These issues are further analyzed in terms of context, input, process and outcome factors, with a strong emphasis on the process factors. Living up to school rules, student participation in school decision making, intercultural conflict and reflective pedagogy were identified as key “process” dimensions, impacting on informal learning for active citizenship at school. In a final section these areas are tentatively worked out as a set of process indicators, applicable in future international comparative studies. KeywordsEducational indicators–Citizenship education–Informal learning–School climate–Democracy at school
    Educational Assessment Evaluation and Accountability 01/2011; 23(3):201-222.
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    ABSTRACT: This study evaluated perceived assessment practices needs among social studies teachers in Cross River State, Nigeria, in relation to some teacher factors (attitude towards social studies, sex, teaching experience and educational qualification). Subjects who participated in this study were 297 social studies teachers (144 males and 153 females) from 116 secondary schools in the state. Teacher Classroom Assessment Practices Needs Questionnaire (TCANQ) and Teacher Attitude towards social studies Inventory were used for data collection in the study. Cronbach coefficient alpha of .81 and .93 were obtained as estimate of construct validity and internal consistency reliability for the Teacher Classroom Assessment Practices Needs Questionnaire and the Teacher Attitude towards social studies Inventory respectively. Independent t-test, one way analysis of variance and Pearson Product Moment correlation were used to test the hypotheses. Results indicated that gender and teacher qualification significantly influence perceived assessment practices needs of social studies teachers. Significant positive relationship was observed between years of teaching experience and expressed assessment practices needs; and between attitude towards social studies and assessment needs. It was concluded that factors such as years of teaching experience, attitude towards social studies, gender and educational qualification significantly influence social studies teachers perceive priority needs in assessment practices.
    Educational Assessment Evaluation and Accountability 01/2011; 23(4).

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