Educational Assessment Evaluation and Accountability

Publisher: Springer (Firm), Springer Verlag

Description

Impact factor 0.69

  • 5-year impact
    0.69
  • Cited half-life
    0.00
  • Immediacy index
    0.06
  • Eigenfactor
    0.00
  • Article influence
    0.18
  • Other titles
    Educational assessment, evaluation and accountability
  • ISSN
    1874-8597
  • OCLC
    316864809
  • Material type
    Periodical
  • Document type
    Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Springer Verlag

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    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
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  • Conditions
    • Author's pre-print on pre-print servers such as arXiv.org
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    • Author's post-print on any open access repository after 12 months after publication
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Set phrase to accompany link to published version (see policy)
    • Articles in some journals can be made Open Access on payment of additional charge
  • Classification
    ​ green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Multi-source evaluation of school principals is likely to become increasingly common in education contexts as the evidence accumulates about the relationship between principal effectiveness and student achievement. The purpose of this study was to examine (1) the magnitude and direction of discrepancy between how principals and their teachers perceive the principal’s effectiveness and (2) what predicts principals who are at risk because their self-ratings considerably exceed the ratings others give them. We also investigated the appropriateness of various probability cut levels in analyses to predict overrating principals. The data sources were ratings by New Zealand principals (n = 135) and their teachers (n = 2757) of principal effectiveness—one scale (16 items) of an educational leadership practices survey. On average, both groups rated principals highly, and teachers tended to rate their principal higher than the principals rated themselves. There was more variance in teachers’ ratings than principals’ ratings. The variables of principal age (younger), time in principal role at the school (shorter), and socio-economic status of the school (lower) were all associated with greater magnitudes of discrepancy. Such discrepancies have implications for principals’ evaluations, principal development efforts, and for school improvement.
    Educational Assessment Evaluation and Accountability 01/2015;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In recent years, initiatives for the improvement of teachingquality havebeen pursued both at European and national levels. Such is the case of the European Standards and Guidelines for Quality Assurance (ESG) and of legislation passed by several European countries, including Portugal, in response to European policy developments driven by the Lisbon Strategy and the Bologna Process. This paper is concerned with the institutional level implementationof Europeanand nationalpolicies which target the quality ofteachingstaff. Itreports onthe findingsofa study conducted in order to analyse if Portuguese higher education institutions are taking measures to improve and assure the quality of teaching staff in compliance particularly with the ESG. Findings suggest that this compliance is only partial. Although mechanisms exist for the selection, recruitment and appraisal of academics, other instruments and measures meanttocontinuously improve teachingstaff quality, suchasinstitutional support for skills development, pedagogic training, material infrastructure and motivation strategies, such as awards and recognition, are still incipient.
    Educational Assessment Evaluation and Accountability 01/2015;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This paper introduces an empirical study that examines how teachers evaluate pupils’ responses. The study draws on research undertaken at four secondary schools in the Czech Republic. It transpires that feedback has a stable position in the structure of communication; however, it is used only to verify pupils’ responses and not to elaborate them. An important feature of feedback is its implicitness and near-zero content value resulting from the teachers’ preferences to avoid explicit evaluative comments. This type of feedback is not in accordance with the concepts of dialogical education that currently dominate the field of the theory of educational communication.
    Educational Assessment Evaluation and Accountability 03/2014; 24(3).
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    ABSTRACT: Teacher education institutions conduct information and communications technology (ICT) courses to prepare preservice teachers (or initial teacher education candidates) to support their teaching practice with appropriate ICT tools. ICT course evaluations based on preservice teachers’ perception of course experiences are limited in indicating the kinds of ICT integration knowledge or technological pedagogical content knowledge (TPACK) preservice teachers have gained throughout the course. Preservice teachers’ ICT course experiences was found to influence their intentions to integrate ICT but its influence on their TPACK perceptions, if better understood, can inform teacher education institutions about the design of ICT courses. This study describes the design and validation of an ICT course evaluation instrument that examines preservice teachers’ perceptions of ICT course experiences and TPACK. Hierarchical regression analysis was performed on survey results collected from a graduating cohort of 869 Singapore preservice teachers who had undergone a compulsory ICT course during their teacher training program. These preservice teachers were being prepared to teach the different subject areas at primary, secondary, and junior colleges (or postsecondary institutions for 17–19 year olds) in Singapore. The regression model showed that preservice teachers’ perceived TPACK was first influenced by their perceptions of course experiences that supported the development of intermediary TPACK knowledge components such as technological knowledge and technological pedagogical knowledge. The methodological implications for the design of ICT course evaluation surveys and the practical applications of survey results to the refinement of ICT course curriculum are discussed.
    Educational Assessment Evaluation and Accountability 11/2013;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Many studies point to potential unintended consequences of accountability systems such as when schools narrow their teaching to fixate on tested subjects. As a result, some states and districts in the USA have complemented the federal test-based accountability system with additional measures of educational practices to hold schools accountable on multiple measures. To explore the consequences of such systems, this study focuses on the responses of nine elementary schools to a multiple-measure accountability system in New York City, including high-stakes tests and quality reviews. While some schools showed broader improvement efforts, results suggest the state test remains the dominant measure in driving responses of schools, and in some cases, the quality review further reinforces the schools' focus on the test.
    Educational Assessment Evaluation and Accountability 11/2013; 25(4).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The Performance Assessment for California Teachers (PACT) is an authentic tool for evaluating prospective teachers by examining their abilities to plan, teach, assess, and reflect on instruction in actual classroom practice. The PACT seeks both to measure and develop teacher effectiveness, and this study of its predictive and consequential validity provides information on how well it achieves these goals. The research finds that teacher candidates’ PACT scores are significant predictors of their later teaching effectiveness as measured by their students’ achievement gains in both English language arts (ELA) and mathematics. Several subscales of the PACT are also influential in predicting later effectiveness: These include planning, assessment, and academic language development in ELA, and assessment and reflection in mathematics. In addition, large majorities of PACT candidates report that they acquired additional knowledge and skills for teaching by virtue of completing the assessment. Candidates’ feelings that they learned from the assessment were the strongest when they also felt well-supported by their program in learning to teach and in completing the assessment process.
    Educational Assessment Evaluation and Accountability 08/2013; 25(3).
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    ABSTRACT: Given the international need to improve student learning, there is nothing more important than classroom teachers. Obtaining a deeper understanding of effective classrooms is a priority if educational reform efforts are to succeed in any educational system around the world. In the last decade, educational researchers have expanded the knowledge base about the impact of teachers, but far less is known about what effective teachers do that make such a positive difference. This investigation focuses on the relationship between attributes of effective teaching, as perceived by both more and less effective teachers, and fourth grade reading achievement results of their students. This investigation used value-added modeling methods as the first step for identifying the more and less effective fourth grade teachers (N = 261) and their students (N = 6,962). Survey research methods were used to compare the perceptions about characteristics of effective teaching for teachers previously identified—in the value-added model—as (a) more effective and (b) less effective. Findings indicated that the more effective teachers value classroom management and organization as the number one characteristic of effective teaching; that, in turn, enables the more effective teachers to focus classroom time on student learning. Implications for theory and practice are discussed.
    Educational Assessment Evaluation and Accountability 08/2013; 25(3).
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    ABSTRACT: The readiness and expectations questionnaire (REQ) assesses first-year students’ expectations and preparedness for their first year in university. This measurement instrument is useful for educational policy and curriculum development; it can also be used to predict the outcomes of the first year of college. This instrument was initially developed to compare students enrolled in programs in the Netherlands and New Zealand, with predominant populations of domestic students. However, the Bologna process and globalisation trends also have increased the availability of international degree programmes. This raised the question whether the REQ can be used to compare groups of international students. Therefore, this article aims to assess the cross-cultural measurement equivalence of the REQ in international bachelor degree programmes in economics and business in a Dutch university, taught in English. The results indicate that not all aspects of the instrument achieve measurement equivalence, but most of its scales, with some adaptations, can evaluate students’ expectations and preparedness and thus encourage a better match between student and institution.
    Educational Assessment Evaluation and Accountability 05/2013; 25(2).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The readiness and expectations questionnaire (REQ) assesses first-year students’ expectations and preparedness for their first year in university. This measurement instrument is useful for educational policy and curriculum development; it can also be used to predict the outcomes of the first year of college. This instrument was initially developed to compare students enrolled in programs in the Netherlands and New Zealand, with predominant populations of domestic students. However, the Bologna process and globalisation trends also have increased the availability of international degree programmes. This raised the question whether the REQ can be used to compare groups of international students. Therefore, this article aims to assess the cross-cultural measurement equivalence of the REQ in international bachelor degree programmes in economics and business in a Dutch university, taught in English. The results indicate that not all aspects of the instrument achieve measurement equivalence, but most of its scales, with some adaptations, can evaluate students’ expectations and preparedness and thus encourage a better match between student and institution.
    Educational Assessment Evaluation and Accountability 05/2013; 25(2):115 - 130.
  • Educational Assessment Evaluation and Accountability 02/2013; 26(1):95-104.
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    ABSTRACT: In the Swedish educational system, teachers have the dual responsibility of assigning final grades and marking their own students’ national tests. The Government has mandated the Swedish Schools Inspectorate to remark samples of the national tests to see if teacher marking can be trusted. Reports from this project have concluded that intermarker consistency is low and that teachers’ markings are generous as compared to those of the external markers. These findings have been heavily publicized, leading to distrust in teachers’ assessments. In the article, we analyze and discuss the remarking studies from methodological as well as substantive angles. We conclude that the design applied in the reanalysis does not allow inferences about bias in marking across schools or teachers. We also conclude that there are several alternative explanations for the observation that teacher marks are higher than the external marks: The external markers did not form a representative sample, they read copies with sometimes marginal legibility, and they used a different scale for marking than the teachers had used. The results are thus not as clearcut as suggested by the reports and media releases, which is because a school inspections logic rather than a research logic was applied in designing, conducting, and reporting the studies.
    Educational Assessment Evaluation and Accountability 02/2013; 25(1).
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    ABSTRACT: School inspection is used by most European education systems as a major instrument for controlling and promoting the quality of schools. Surprisingly, there is little research knowledge about how school inspections drive the improvement of schools and which types of approaches are most effective and cause the least unintended consequences. The study presented in this paper uses interviews with inspection officials and a document analysis to reconstruct the “program theories” (i.e. the assumptions on causal mechanisms, linking school inspections to their intended outcomes of improved teaching and learning) of Inspectorates of Education in six European countries. The results section of the paper starts with a summary of the commonalities and differences of these six national inspection models with respect to standards and thresholds used, to types of feedback and reporting, and to the sanctions, rewards and interventions applied to motivate schools to improve. Next, the intermediate processes through which these inspection models are expected to promote good education (e.g. through actions of stakeholders) are explained. In the concluding section, these assumptions are critically discussed in the light of research knowledge.
    Educational Assessment Evaluation and Accountability 02/2013; 25(1).
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to examine the connections between national culture and student achievement. Using Hofstede’s six cultural dimensions and the two dimensions from the World Values survey, we conducted multiple regressions to determine the most significant predictors of student achievement as measured by the 2009 Program for International Student Assessment in reading, mathematics, and science. Our analyses found that the most significant predictors of student achievement on all three student outcome included the following cultural dimensions based on two different frameworks: (1) a culture’s focus on fostering long-term orientation to include emphasis on perseverance to achieve future-oriented results and (2) a culture’s focus on secular-rational values vs. traditional values. In addition, findings indicate that when mapped geographically, similar patterns emerge among the two cultural dimensions.
    Educational Assessment Evaluation and Accountability 01/2013; 25(3).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: With the implementation of teacher performance pay in 2009 in China, teacher performance evaluation has become a heated topic. This research study follows up on two previous studies of teacher evaluation in China and continues the dialog by analyzing the latest trends in the context of teacher performance pay. There were two sources of information for this article: academic journal articles and teacher evaluation practices of two schools from Beijing. Seven themes were derived from a content analysis of the academic journal articles: (a) studies on teacher evaluation within the context of curriculum reform, (b) methods of teacher evaluation, (c) studies of miscellaneous responses, (d) studies on developmental teacher evaluation, (e) studies on teacher performance evaluation, (f) studies on teacher effectiveness, and (g) philosophical thoughts of teacher evaluation. The two cases of teacher evaluation practices revealed some changes since the implementation of teacher performance pay, such as a more comprehensive teacher evaluation system.
    Educational Assessment Evaluation and Accountability 01/2013; 25(3).