Medical dosimetry: official journal of the American Association of Medical Dosimetrists

Publisher: Elsevier

Journal description

Current impact factor: 0.95

Impact Factor Rankings

2015 Impact Factor Available summer 2015
2013 / 2014 Impact Factor 0.952
2012 Impact Factor 1.009
2011 Impact Factor 1
2010 Impact Factor 0.941
2009 Impact Factor 1.256
2008 Impact Factor 2.324
2007 Impact Factor 2.167

Impact factor over time

Impact factor
Year

Additional details

5-year impact 0.00
Cited half-life 4.90
Immediacy index 0.16
Eigenfactor 0.00
Article influence 0.00
ISSN 1873-4022

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Elsevier

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Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In linac-based stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and radiotherapy (SRT), circular cone(s) or conformal arc(s) are conventionally used to treat intracranial lesions. However, when the target is in close proximity to critical structures, it is frequently quite challenging to generate a quality plan using these techniques. In this study, we investigated the dosimetric characteristics of using high-dose rate RapidArc (RA) technique for radiosurgical treatment of intracranial lesions. A total of 10 intracranial SRS/SRT cases previously planned using dynamic conformal arc (DCA) or cone-based techniques have been included in this study. For each case, 3 treatment plans were generated: (1) a DCA plan with multiple noncoplanar arcs, (2) a high-dose rate RA plan with arcs oriented the same as DCA (multiple-arc RA), and 3) a high-dose rate RA plan with a single coplanar arc (single-arc RA). All treatment plans were generated under the same prescription and similar critical structure dose limits. Plan quality for different plans was evaluated by comparing various dosimetric parameters such as target coverage, conformity index (CI), homogeneity index (HI), critical structures, and normal brain tissue doses as well as beam delivery time. With similar critical structure sparing, high-dose rate RA plans can achieve much better target coverage, dose conformity, and dose homogeneity than the DCA plans can. Plan quality indices CI and HI, for the DCA, multiple-arc RA, and single-arc RA techniques, were measured as 1.67 ± 0.39, 1.32 ± 0.28, and 1.38 ± 0.30 and 1.24 ± 0.11, 1.10 ± 0.04, and 1.12 ± 0.07, respectively. Normal brain tissue dose (V12Gy) was found to be similar for DCA and multiple-arc RA plans but much larger for the single-arc RA plans. Beam delivery was similar for DCA and multiple-arc RA plans but shorter with single-arc RA plans. Multiple-arc RA SRS/SRT can provide better treatment plans than conventional DCA plans, especially for complex cases. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.
    Medical dosimetry: official journal of the American Association of Medical Dosimetrists 05/2015; 40(1):3-8. DOI:10.1016/j.meddos.2014.01.002
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    ABSTRACT: Owing to the technical and logistical complexities of matching photon and proton treatment modalities, we developed and implemented a technique of comprehensive head and neck radiation using 3-dimensional (3D) conformal proton therapy. A monoisocentric technique was used with a 30-cm snout. Cervical lymphatics were treated with 3 fields: a posterior-anterior field with a midline block and a right and a left posterior oblique field. The matchline of the 3 cervical nodal fields with the primary tumor site fields was staggered by 0.5cm. Comparative intensity-modulated photon plans were later developed for 12 previously treated patients to provide equivalent target coverage, while matching or improving on the proton plans׳ sparing of organs at risk (OARs). Dosimetry to OARs was evaluated and compared by treatment modality. Comprehensive head and neck irradiation using proton therapy yielded treatment plans with significant dose avoidance of the oral cavity and midline neck structures. When compared with the generated intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans, the proton treatment plans yielded statistically significant reductions in the mean and integral radiation dose to the oral cavity, larynx, esophagus, and the maximally spared parotid gland. There was no significant difference in mean dose to the lesser-spared parotid gland by treatment modality or in mean or integral dose to the spared submandibular glands. A technique for cervical nodal irradiation using 3D conformal proton therapy with uniform scanning was developed and clinically implemented. Use of proton therapy for cervical nodal irradiation resulted in large volume of dose avoidance to the oral cavity and low dose exposure to midline structures of the larynx and the esophagus, with lower mean and integral dose to assessed OARs when compared with competing IMRT plans. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Medical Dosimetrists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Medical dosimetry: official journal of the American Association of Medical Dosimetrists 05/2015; DOI:10.1016/j.meddos.2015.04.004
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    ABSTRACT: Although the prostate displacement of patients in the prone position is affected by respiration-induced motion, the effect of intrafractional prostate motion in the prone position during "simultaneous integrated boost intensity-modulated radiotherapy" (SIB-IMRT) is unclear. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the dosimetric effects of intrafractional motion on SIB-IMRT to a dominant intraprostatic lesion (IPL) using measured motion data of patients in a prone position, fixed with a thermoplastic shell. We obtained 2 orthogonal x-ray fluoroscopic images at the same moment every 0.2 seconds for 30 seconds before and after treatment, once weekly, from 7 patients with localized prostate cancer with detectable prostatic calcification. Prostate displacements in the left-right (LR), anteroposterior (AP), and superoinferior (SI) directions were calculated using the prostatic calcification as a fiducial marker. We defined the displacement between pretreatment and posttreatment as baseline drift (BD). An SIB-IMRT plan was generated in which each IPL + 3mm received a dose of 94.5Gy, whereas the remainder of the prostate + 7mm received a dose of 75.6Gy in 9 fields. A simulated plan of dose blurring was generated by the convolution of isocenter-shifted plans using measured motion data in 30 seconds and motion in 30 seconds + distance between pretreatment and posttreatment position (BD) for each of the 7 patients. The motion in 30 seconds mainly reflected respiration-induced motion. The mean displacements of BD were 1.4mm (- 3.1 to 8.2mm), - 2.2mm (- 9.1 to 1.5mm), and - 0.3mm (- 5.0 to 1.8mm) in the AP, SI, and LR directions, respectively. The differences in the target coverage with V90% of the IPL and V100% of the prostate between the simulated plan and original plan were - 3.9% to - 0.3% and - 0.6% to 1.1% for respiration-induced motion and 3.1% to - 67.8% and 3.6% to - 13.3% for BD with respiration-induced motion, respectively. The large motion of BD resulted in an inadequate coverage by the prescribed dose of the SIB-IMRT to the IPL. A 7-mm margin is recommended when real-time tracking techniques are not applied. The effect of respiration-induced motion was small, so long as a 3-mm margin was added. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Medical Dosimetrists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Medical dosimetry: official journal of the American Association of Medical Dosimetrists 05/2015; DOI:10.1016/j.meddos.2015.04.003
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    ABSTRACT: Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) shows promise in unresectable pancreatic cancer, though this treatment modality has high rates of normal tissue toxicity. This study explores the dosimetric utility of daily adaptive re-planning with pancreas SBRT. We used a previously developed supercomputing online re-planning environment (SCORE) to re-plan 10 patients with pancreas SBRT. Tumor and normal tissue contours were deformed from treatment planning computed tomographies (CTs) and transferred to daily cone-beam CT (CBCT) scans before re-optimizing each daily treatment plan. We compared the intended radiation dose, the actual radiation dose, and the optimized radiation dose for the pancreas tumor planning target volume (PTV) and the duodenum. Treatment re-optimization improved coverage of the PTV and reduced dose to the duodenum. Within the PTV, the actual hot spot (volume receiving 110% of the prescription dose) decreased from 4.5% to 0.5% after daily adaptive re-planning. Within the duodenum, the volume receiving the prescription dose decreased from 0.9% to 0.3% after re-planning. It is noteworthy that variation in the amount of air within a patient׳s stomach substantially changed dose to the PTV. Adaptive re-planning with pancreas SBRT has the ability to improve dose to the tumor and decrease dose to the nearby duodenum, thereby reducing the risk of toxicity. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Medical Dosimetrists. All rights reserved.
    Medical dosimetry: official journal of the American Association of Medical Dosimetrists 05/2015; DOI:10.1016/j.meddos.2015.04.002
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    ABSTRACT: When standard conformal x-ray technique for craniospinal irradiation is used, it is a challenge to achieve satisfactory dose coverage of the target including the area of the cribriform plate, while sparing organs at risk. We present a new intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), noncoplanar technique, for delivering irradiation to the cranial part and compare it with 3 other techniques and previously published results. A total of 13 patients who had previously received craniospinal irradiation with standard conformal x-ray technique were reviewed. New treatment plans were generated for each patient using the noncoplanar IMRT-based technique, a coplanar IMRT-based technique, and a coplanar volumetric-modulated arch therapy (VMAT) technique. Dosimetry data for all patients were compared with the corresponding data from the conventional treatment plans. The new noncoplanar IMRT technique substantially reduced the mean dose to organs at risk compared with the standard radiation technique. The 2 other coplanar techniques also reduced the mean dose to some of the critical organs. However, this reduction was not as substantial as the reduction obtained by the noncoplanar technique. Furthermore, compared with the standard technique, the IMRT techniques reduced the total calculated radiation dose that was delivered to the normal tissue, whereas the VMAT technique increased this dose. Additionally, the coverage of the target was significantly improved by the noncoplanar IMRT technique. Compared with the standard technique, the coplanar IMRT and the VMAT technique did not improve the coverage of the target significantly. All the new planning techniques increased the number of monitor units (MU) used-the noncoplanar IMRT technique by 99%, the coplanar IMRT technique by 122%, and the VMAT technique by 26%-causing concern for leak radiation. The noncoplanar IMRT technique covered the target better and decreased doses to organs at risk compared with the other techniques. All the new techniques increased the number of MU compared with the standard technique. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Medical Dosimetrists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Medical dosimetry: official journal of the American Association of Medical Dosimetrists 05/2015; DOI:10.1016/j.meddos.2015.03.007
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    ABSTRACT: The effect of a treatment couch on dose perturbation is not always fully considered in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). In the course of inverse planning radiotherapy techniques, beam parameter optimization may change in the absence of the couch, causing errors in the calculated dose distributions. Although modern treatment planning systems (TPS) include data for the treatment couch components, they are not manufactured identically. Thus, variations in their Hounsfield unit (HU) values may exist. Moreover, a radiotherapy facility may wish to have a third-party custom tabletop installed that is not included by the TPS vendor. This study demonstrates a practical and simple method of acquiring reliable computed tomography (CT) data for the treatment couch and shows how the absorbed dose calculated with the modeled treatment couch can differ from that with the default treatment couch found in the TPS. We also experimentally verified that neglecting to incorporate the treatment couch completely in the treatment planning process might result in dose differences of up to 9.5% and 7.3% for 4-MV and 10-MV photon beams, respectively. Furthermore, 20 RapidArc and IMRT cases were used to quantify the change in calculated dose distributions caused by using either the default or modeled couch. From 2-dimensional (2D) ionization chamber array measurements, we observed large dose distribution differences between the measurements and calculations when the couch was omitted that varied according to the planning technique and anatomic site. Thus, incorporating the treatment couch in the dose calculation phase of treatment planning significantly decreases dose calculation errors. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Medical Dosimetrists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Medical dosimetry: official journal of the American Association of Medical Dosimetrists 04/2015; DOI:10.1016/j.meddos.2015.03.008
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    ABSTRACT: A prospective pilot study of partial breast irradiation (PBI) with conventional vs hypofractionated schedules was set out. The study aimed to determine efficacy, acute and late side effects, and the preference of photon vs electron irradiation based on individual features. Patients were enrolled according to internationally accepted guidelines on PBI. Conformal radiotherapy plans were generated with both photon and electron beams, and the preferred technique based on dose homogeneity and the radiation exposure of healthy tissues was applied. For electron dose verification, a special phantom was constructed. Patients were randomized for fractionation schedules of 25 × 2 vs 13 × 3Gy. Skin and breast changes were registered at the time of and ≥1 year after the completion of radiotherapy. Dose homogeneity was better with photons. If the tumor bed was located in the inner quadrants, electron beam gave superior results regarding conformity and sparing of organ at risk (OAR). If the tumor was situated in the lateral quadrants, conformity was better with photons. A depth of the tumor bed ≥3.0cm predicted the superiority of photon irradiation (odds ratio [OR] = 23.6, 95% CI: 5.2 to 107.5, p < 0.001) with >90% sensitivity and specificity. After a median follow-up of 39 months, among 72 irradiated cases, 1 local relapse out of the tumor bed was detected. Acute radiodermatitis of grade I to II, hyperpigmentation, and telangiectasia developed ≥1 year after radiotherapy, exclusively after electron beam radiotherapy. The choice of electrons or photons for PBI should be based on tumor bed location; the used methods are efficient and feasible. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Medical Dosimetrists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Medical dosimetry: official journal of the American Association of Medical Dosimetrists 04/2015; DOI:10.1016/j.meddos.2015.03.006
  • Medical dosimetry: official journal of the American Association of Medical Dosimetrists 04/2015; DOI:10.1016/j.meddos.2015.03.002
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    ABSTRACT: The American Association of Medical Dosimetrists (AAMD) designed and directed 2 surveys of the AAMD membership. The first was in 2011 and the second in 2014. There were a number of questions common to both surveys, and this article seeks to evaluate these common questions to determine trends among the professional membership of the AAMD. It is demonstrated that the observed trends are consistent with the goals and objectives established by the leadership of the AAMD and the Medical Dosimetry Certification Board (MDCB) for the medical dosimetry community. In addition, certain challenges and opportunities involving the scope of practice for the medical dosimetry profession are discussed. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Medical Dosimetrists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Medical dosimetry: official journal of the American Association of Medical Dosimetrists 04/2015; DOI:10.1016/j.meddos.2015.03.001
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    ABSTRACT: The world of health care delivery is becoming increasingly complex. The purpose of this manuscript is to analyze current metrics and analytically predict future practices and principles of medical dosimetry. The results indicate five potential areas precipitating change factors: a) evolutionary and revolutionary thinking processes, b) social factors, c) economic factors, d) political factors, and e) technological factors. Outcomes indicate that significant changes will occur in the job structure and content of being a practicing medical dosimetrist. Discussion indicates potential variables that can occur within each process and change factor and how the predicted outcomes can deviate from normative values. Finally, based on predicted outcomes, future opportunities for medical dosimetrists are given. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.
    Medical dosimetry: official journal of the American Association of Medical Dosimetrists 04/2015; DOI:10.1016/j.meddos.2015.03.003
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    ABSTRACT: To evaluate the dosimetric effect of placing the isocenter away from the planning target volume (PTV) on intensity-modulated radiosurgery (IMRS) plans to treat brain lesions. A total of 15 patients who received cranial IMRS at our institution were randomly selected. Each patient was treated with an IMRS plan designed with the isocenter located at the target center (plan A). A second off-target isocenter plan (plan B) was generated for each case. In all the plans,100% of the prescription dose covered 99% of the target volume. The plans A and B were compared for the target dosage (conformity index [CI] and homogeneity index) and organs-at-risk (OAR) dose sparing. Peripheral dose falloff was compared by using the metrics volume of normal brain receiving more than 12-Gy dose (V12) and CI at the level of the 50% of the prescription dose (CI 50%). The values found for each metric (plan B vs plan A) were (mean ± standard deviation [SD]) as follows-CI: 1.28 ± 0.15 vs 1.28 ± 0.15, p = 0.978; homogeneity index (HI): 1.29 ± 0.14 vs 1.34 ± 0.17, p = 0.079; maximum dose to the brainstem: 2.95 ± 2.11 vs 2.89 ± 1.88Gy, p = 0.813; maximum dose to the optical pathway: 2.65 ± 4.18 vs 2.44 ± 4.03Gy, p = 0.195; and maximum dose to the eye lens: 0.33 ± 0.73 vs 0.33 ± 0.53Gy, p = 0.970. The values of the peripheral dose falloff were (plan B vs plan A) as follows-V12: 5.98 ± 4.95 vs 6.06 ± 4.92cm(3), p = 0.622, and CI 50%: 6.08 ± 2.77 vs 6.28 ± 3.01, p = 0.119. The off-target isocenter solution resulted in dosimetrically comparable plans as the center-target isocenter technique, by avoiding the risk of gantry-couch collision during the cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) acquisition. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Medical Dosimetrists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Medical dosimetry: official journal of the American Association of Medical Dosimetrists 03/2015; DOI:10.1016/j.meddos.2015.02.003
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    ABSTRACT: Targeted focal therapy strategies for treating single-lobe prostate cancer are under investigation. In this planning study, we investigate the feasibility of treating a portion of the prostate to full-dose external beam radiation with reduced dose to the opposite lobe, compared with full-dose radiation delivered to the entire gland using hypofractionated radiation. For 10 consecutive patients with low- to intermediate-risk prostate cancer, 2 hypofractionated, single-arc volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans were designed. The first plan (standard hypofractionation regimen [STD]) included the entire prostate gland, treated to 70Gy delivered in 28 fractions. The second dose painting plan (DP) encompassed the involved lobe treated to 70Gy delivered in 28 fractions, whereas the opposing, uninvolved lobe received 50.4Gy in 28 fractions. Mean dose to the opposing neurovascular bundle (NVB) was considerably lower for DP vs STD, with a mean dose of 53.9 vs 72.3Gy (p < 0.001). Mean penile bulb dose was 18.6Gy for DP vs 19.2Gy for STD (p = 0.880). Mean rectal dose was 21.0Gy for DP vs 22.8Gy for STD (p = 0.356). Rectum V70 (the volume receiving ≥70Gy) was 2.01% for DP vs 2.74% for STD (p = 0.328). Bladder V70 was 1.69% for DP vs 2.78% for STD (p = 0.232). Planning target volume (PTV) maximum dose points were 76.5 and 76.3Gy for DP and STD, respectively (p = 0.760). This study demonstrates the feasibility of using VMAT for partial-lobe prostate radiation in patients with prostate cancer involving 1 lobe. Partial-lobe prostate plans appeared to spare adjacent critical structures including the opposite NVB. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Medical Dosimetrists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Medical dosimetry: official journal of the American Association of Medical Dosimetrists 03/2015; DOI:10.1016/j.meddos.2015.02.002
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to compare the clinical benefits of inverse planning simulated annealing (IPSA)-based optimization over volume-based optimization for high-dose rate (HDR) cervix interstitial implants. Overall, 10 patients of cervical carcinoma were considered for treatment with HDR interstitial brachytherapy. Oncentra Master Plan brachytherapy planning system was used for generating 3-dimensional HDR treatment planning for all patients. All patient treatments were planned using volume-based optimization and inverse planning optimization (IPSA). The parameters V100, V150, and V200 for the target; [Formula: see text] of bladder, rectum, and sigmoid colon; and V80 and V100 for bladder, rectum, and sigmoid colon were compared using dose-volume histograms (DVHs). The conformity index (CI), relative dose homogeneity index, overdose volume index (ODI), and dose nonuniformity index (DNR) were computed from cumulative DVHs. Good target coverage for prescription dose was achieved with volume-based optimization as compared with IPSA-based dose optimization. Homogeneity was good with the IPSA-based technique as compared with the volume-based dose optimization technique. Volume-based optimization resulted in a higher CI (with a mean value of 0.87) compared with the IPSA-based optimization (with a mean value of 0.76). ODI and DNR are better for the IPSA-based plan as compared with the volume-based plan. Mean doses to the bladder, rectum, and sigmoid colon were least with IPSA. IPSA also spared the critical organs but with considerable target conformity as compared with the volume-based plan. IPSA significantly reduces overall treatment planning time with improved reduced doses to the organs at risk compared with the volume-based optimization treatment planning method. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Medical Dosimetrists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Medical dosimetry: official journal of the American Association of Medical Dosimetrists 03/2015; DOI:10.1016/j.meddos.2015.01.003
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    ABSTRACT: It is important to minimize the radiation dose delivered to healthy tissues in pediatric cancer treatment because of the risk of secondary malignancies. Tomotherapy HDA provides a dynamic jaw (DJ) delivery mode that creates a sharper penumbra at the craniocaudal ends of a target in addition to a fixed jaw (FJ) delivery mode. The purpose of this study was to evaluate its dosimetric effect on the pediatric cancer cases. We included 6 pediatric cases in this study. The dose profiles and plan statistics-target dose conformity, uniformity, organ-at-risk (OAR) mean dose, beam-on time, and integral dose-were compared for each case. Consequently, the target dose coverage and uniformity were similar for different jaw settings. The OAR dose sparing depended on its relative location to the target and disease sites. For example, in the head and neck cancer cases, the brain stem dose using DJ 2.5 was reduced by more than two-fold (2.4Gy vs. 6.3Gy) than that obtained with FJ 2.5. The integral dose with DJ 2.5 decreased by more than 9% compared with that with FJ 2.5. Thus, using dynamic jaw in pediatric cases could be critical to reduce a probability of a secondary malignancy. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Medical Dosimetrists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Medical dosimetry: official journal of the American Association of Medical Dosimetrists 03/2015; DOI:10.1016/j.meddos.2015.01.007
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    ABSTRACT: A metallic contact eye shield has sometimes been used for eyelid treatment, but dose distribution has never been reported for a patient case. This study aimed to show the shield-incorporated CT-based dose distribution using the Pinnacle system and Monte Carlo (MC) calculation for 3 patient cases. For the artifact-free CT scan, an acrylic shield machined as the same size as that of the tungsten shield was used. For the MC calculation, BEAMnrc and DOSXYZnrc were used for the 6-MeV electron beam of the Varian 21EX, in which information for the tungsten, stainless steel, and aluminum material for the eye shield was used. The same plan was generated on the Pinnacle system and both were compared. The use of the acrylic shield produced clear CT images, enabling delineation of the regions of interest, and yielded CT-based dose calculation for the metallic shield. Both the MC and the Pinnacle systems showed a similar dose distribution downstream of the eye shield, reflecting the blocking effect of the metallic eye shield. The major difference between the MC and the Pinnacle results was the target eyelid dose upstream of the shield such that the Pinnacle system underestimated the dose by 19 to 28% and 11 to 18% for the maximum and the mean doses, respectively. The pattern of dose difference between the MC and the Pinnacle systems was similar to that in the previous phantom study. In conclusion, the metallic eye shield was successfully incorporated into the CT-based planning, and the accurate dose calculation requires MC simulation. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Medical Dosimetrists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Medical dosimetry: official journal of the American Association of Medical Dosimetrists 02/2015; DOI:10.1016/j.meddos.2015.01.006
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    ABSTRACT: Sparing one or both parotid glands is a key goal when planning head and neck cancer radiation treatment. If the planning target volume (PTV) overlaps one or both parotid glands substantially, it may not be possible to achieve adequate gland sparing. This finding results in physicians revising their PTV contours after an intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plan has been run and reduces workflow efficiency. We devised a simple formula for predicting mean parotid gland dose from the overlap of the parotid gland and isotropically expanded PTV contours. We tested the tool using 44 patients from 2 institutions and found agreement between predicted and actual parotid gland doses (mean absolute error = 5.3Gy). This simple method could increase treatment planning efficiency by improving the chance that the first plan presented to the physician will have optimal parotid gland sparing. Published by Elsevier Inc.
    Medical dosimetry: official journal of the American Association of Medical Dosimetrists 02/2015; DOI:10.1016/j.meddos.2015.01.002
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    ABSTRACT: A method is presented in which the couch position is predicted before the treatment instead of obtaining a reference position at the first treatment fraction. This prevents systematic differences in patient posture between preparation and treatment. In literature, only limited data are available on couch positioning. We position our patients at the planned couch position, allowing a small difference between skin marks and lasers, followed by online imaging. For a 3-month period, our standard deviations (mm) in couch position in the vertical, longitudinal, and lateral directions were head and neck-1.6, 2.8, and 2.5; thorax-2.9, 5.5, and 4.5; breast-3.0, 4.1, and 4.0; and pelvis-3.5, 4.0, and 4.7, respectively. We have improved the reproducibility of patient posture in our institute by using the predicted couch position. Our data may serve as a reference for other institutes because the couch position variation is less than that published in literature. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Medical Dosimetrists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Medical dosimetry: official journal of the American Association of Medical Dosimetrists 01/2015; DOI:10.1016/j.meddos.2014.12.002