Physiotherapy (PHYSIOTHERAPY )

Publisher: Chartered Society of Physiotherapy (Great Britain), Elsevier

Description

Physiotherapy aims to publish original research and facilitate continuing professional development for physiotherapists and other health professions worldwide. Dedicated to the advancement of physiotherapy through publication of research and scholarly work concerned with, but not limited to, its scientific basis and clinical application, education of practitioners, management of services and policy. We are pleased to receive articles reporting original scientific research, systematic or narrative reviews, educational, theoretical or debate articles, brief reports, case histories or single case studies. All papers should demonstrate methodological rigour. Physiotherapy is peer reviewed by an international panel.

  • Impact factor
    1.57
  • 5-year impact
    1.49
  • Cited half-life
    0.00
  • Immediacy index
    0.19
  • Eigenfactor
    0.00
  • Article influence
    0.41
  • Website
    Physiotherapy website
  • Other titles
    Physiotherapy (Online)
  • ISSN
    1873-1465
  • OCLC
    60630130
  • Material type
    Document, Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Elsevier

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Voluntary deposit by author of pre-print allowed on Institutions open scholarly website and pre-print servers
    • Voluntary deposit by author of authors post-print allowed on institutions open scholarly website including Institutional Repository
    • Deposit due to Funding Body, Institutional and Governmental mandate only allowed where separate agreement between repository and publisher exists
    • Set statement to accompany deposit
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to journal home page or articles' DOI
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Articles in some journals can be made Open Access on payment of additional charge
    • NIH Authors articles will be submitted to PMC after 12 months
    • Authors who are required to deposit in subject repositories may also use Sponsorship Option
    • Pre-print can not be deposited for The Lancet
  • Classification
    ​ green

Publications in this journal

  • Physiotherapy 06/2014; 100(2):93.
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    ABSTRACT: To compare sensitivity of pathology on imaging between referrals from primary care, physiotherapists, spinal surgeons and other secondary care providers.
    Physiotherapy 05/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: (1) To identify risk factors for chronic disability in people with acute whiplash associated disorders (WAD). (2) To estimate the impact of the numbers of risk factors present.
    Physiotherapy 04/2014;
  • Physiotherapy 01/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Objective To investigate changes and differences in patient outcomes over time for 6, 7 and 8 week pulmonary rehabilitation programmes in order to identify optimal duration. Setting Community based pulmonary rehabilitation programmes in the East of England. Participants In total 363 participants completed one of the three pulmonary rehabilitation programmes. Patients with a chronic respiratory condition showing a commitment to the pulmonary rehabilitation programme and no contraindications to exercise were included. Intervention Pulmonary rehabilitation twice a week for 6, 7 or 8 weeks. Main outcome measures St Georges Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ), Clinical COPD Questionnaire (CCQ), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Score (HADS) and Incremental Shuttle Walk Test (ISWT). Results All patients showed improvements in ISWT post rehabilitation, with the 8 week programme showing the greatest improvement. Conclusion Findings show that greatest improvements in terms of exercise capacity may be seen from 8 week pulmonary rehabilitation programmes, but that improvement for the ISWT can be obtained from 6, 7 or 8 week programmes.
    Physiotherapy 01/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Objective The purpose of this study was to determine if there is an association between admission interview score and subsequent academic and clinical performance, in a four-year undergraduate physiotherapy course. Design Retrospective observational study. Participants 141 physiotherapy students enrolled in two entry year groups. Outcome measures Individual student performance in all course units, practical examinations, clinical placements as well as year level and overall Grade Point Average. Predictor variables included admission interview scores, admission academic scores and demographic data (gender, age and entry level). Results Interview score demonstrated a significant association with performance in three of six clinical placements through the course. This association was stronger than for any other admission criterion although effect sizes were small to moderate. Further, it was the only admission score to have a significant association with overall Clinical Grade Point Average for the two year groups analysed (r = 0.322). By contrast, academic scores on entry showed significant associations with all year level Grade Point Averages except Year 4, the clinical year. Conclusions This is the first study to review the predictive validity of an admission interview for entry into a physiotherapy course in Australia. The results show that performance in this admission interview is associated with overall performance in clinical placements through the course, while academic admission scoring is not. These findings suggest that there is a role for both academic and non-academic selection processes for entry into physiotherapy.
    Physiotherapy 01/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Objective The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of body position on respiratory muscle strength of young healthy subjects. Methods Sixty-three (50 female, mean age 19.7 ± 1.5 years) healthy subjects participated in the study. Maximal inspiratory and expiratory mouth pressures (PImax, PEmax) and lung function were measured in the sitting position, semi-upright sitting position, and in the supine position. The order of the three conditions was randomly determined. Results A significant effect of body position was observed on PEmax values, controlling for gender. PImax in the sitting position (92.8 ± 20.05 cm H2O) was significantly higher than in the supine (84.1 ± 15.1 cm H2O; mean difference: 8.70, 95% CI [5.95, 12.45], p < 0.001) and semi-upright sitting positions (84.4 ± 17.5 cm H2O; mean difference: 8.43, 95% CI [5.78, 11.07], p < 0.001). PEmax was also significantly higher in the sitting position (125.4 ± 34.2 cm H2O) than in the supine (115.8 ± 29.0 cm H2O; mean difference: 9.59, 95% CI [4.86, 14.32], p < 0.001) and semi-upright sitting positions (120.2 ± 33.9 cm H2O; mean difference: 5.21, 95% CI [0.87, 9.54], p = 0.013). Conclusions Body position influences respiratory muscle strength of young healthy subjects. PImax and PEmax are higher in the sitting position than in the supine or semi-upright sitting positions.
    Physiotherapy 01/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Background Around 20% of knee replacement have an unsatisfactory outcome. Pre-operative physiotherapy and education have been proposed to improve post-operative outcomes. Objectives This systematic review evaluated whether these factors improved length of stay and patient reported outcomes after knee replacement surgery. Data sources Medline, Embase, CINAHL, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, PsycINFO and PEDro were searched on the 1st January 2013. Study selection or eligibility criteria Randomised or quasi-randomised studies assessing either pre-operative education or physiotherapy on patients undergoing a planned total or partial knee replacement were included in the review. Only studies with a control group receiving a defined standard of pre-operative care were included. Results Eleven studies met the inclusion criteria set. Two studies analysed the effect of pre-operative education, seven pre-operative physiotherapy and two studies used both factors. No study found significant differences in validated joint specific patient reported outcome measures. The education studies found a decrease in pre-operative expectation and an improvement in knowledge, flexion and regularity of exercise. Two studies found an improvement in muscle strength in the physiotherapy group at three months. The combination of education and physiotherapy was shown to reduce patient length of stay and cost in one study. Conclusion The evidence reviewed is insufficient to support the implementation of either pre-operative education or physiotherapy programmes. The combination of pre-operative education and physiotherapy may reduce the medical costs associated with surgery. Funding No funding was received.
    Physiotherapy 01/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Objective To evaluate the efficacy of a novel, angular, continuous passive motion device for self-treatment at home in patients with mild-to-moderate, non-specific, chronic low back pain (LBP). Design Prospective, randomised, waiting-list-controlled (WLC) trial. Setting Recruitment and assessment were conducted at the Koren Centre for Physical Therapy. Self-treatment was performed at home. Participants Thirty-six patients with a score ≤6 on the numeric rating scale (NRS) for pain were enrolled. Twenty-eight patients completed treatment. Interventions Participants were randomised to receive the Kyrobak (Radiancy, Hod-hasharon, Israel) at enrolment [immediate treatment (IT) group] or 3 weeks later (WLC group). Self-treatment was prescribed for 10 minutes, one to three times per day, for 3 weeks. The treatment period was followed by a 3-week follow-up period. Main outcome measures Primary outcome was self-reported pain level (NRS). Results Three weeks of self-treatment with the Kyrobak reduced pain levels significantly in the IT group compared with the WLC group {mean [standard deviation (SD)] ΔNRS score from baseline to post-treatment: IT group, 1.4 (1.5), 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.5 to 2.3; WLC group, -0.1 (2.2), 95% CI -1.1 to 1.2; effect mean difference 1.5}. This benefit was maintained over the follow-up period (from baseline to end of follow-up, mean (SD) ΔNRS score 1.1 (1.8), 95% CI 0.4 to 1.8). Multi-linear regression analysis found that higher baseline pain resulted in greater pain reduction (P = 0.003). Eighty-three percent of participants with a baseline NRS score >4.35 (threshold determined by logistic regression, P = 0.01) achieved the minimal important change criterion of ΔNRS score ≥2. Daily NRS score reduced gradually over the treatment period (regression slope -0.052 (0.01), 95% CI -0.07 to -0.03). Conclusions Preliminary evidence suggests that the Kyrobak may be beneficial for short-term relief of non-specific, chronic LBP, particularly in participants with a moderate level of pain. A longer treatment period may lead to a further reduction in pain. Clinical Trial Registration Number NCT01620281.
    Physiotherapy 01/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives: To evaluate patients clinically diagnosed with early stage primary/idiopathic adhesive capsulitis (AC) to determine the existence of any pattern of movement loss and associated pain that may facilitate early recognition. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Private upper limb specialty clinic, Newcastle, Australia. Participants: Fifty-two patients clinically diagnosed with early stage AC by a medical practitioner or physiotherapist. Main outcome measures: Percentage loss of active (AROM) and passive (PROM) ranges of eight shoulder movements and the pain level at the end of each movement. The reason for limitation of movement was also recorded. Results: Factor analysis clearly identified two groups for percentage loss of AROM. Notably external rotation movements grouped separately from other movements. A single group emerged for percentage loss of PROM suggesting a non-specific global loss. For both pain at the end of AROM and PROM two groups emerged, however the delineation between the groups was less clear than for percentage loss of AROM suggesting a pattern of end range pain may be less useful in identifying patients in this stage. Conclusions: External rotation movements in neutral and abduction generally group together and behave differently to other shoulder movements in patients clinically diagnosed with early stage primary/idiopathic AC. In particular external rotation in abduction has emerged as the most painfully limited movement in this sample. This study provides preliminary evidence of patterns of range of movement and end range pain that require testing in a population of mixed shoulder diagnoses to determine their diagnostic utility for early stage AC.
    Physiotherapy 01/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Objective To present the normative hand grip strength values measured with a bulb dynamometer for children, by gender and age, and to correlate the findings with weight, height, body composition and handedness. Design Cross-sectional study. Participants Data from 295 healthy children of both genders aged 6 to 13 years were analysed. Methods Weight, height, body composition (Biodynamics model 450 bioimpedance analyser), handedness (Edinburgh scale), and grip strength measured with a bulb dynamometer (North Coast) were obtained. Results Grip strength of both hands increased with age in the two genders. Grip strength was similar in boys and girls between 6 and 13 years of age. The dominant hand was stronger than the non-dominant hand [mean (standard deviation) 7.0 (2.3) psi vs 6.5 (2.1) psi], with a mean difference of 0.52 psi (95% confidence interval of the difference 0.46 to 0.58). Grip strength was positively correlated with fat-free mass and height (r ≥ 0.75). Conclusion This study provides normative values for hand grip strength measured with a bulb dynamometer in children aged 6 to 13 years. This dynamometer provides a simple method to measure grip strength, and the results of this study provide further evidence of its performance in the measurement of grip strength.
    Physiotherapy 01/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives To determine the effect of isometric contraction of the abdominal muscles on inter-rectus distance in postpartum women. Design Preliminary case–control study. Setting Research laboratory. Participants Ten postpartum women {mean age 30 [standard deviation (SD) 4] years; mean weight 58 (SD 7) kg; mean height 159 (SD 4) cm} and 10 nulliparous (control) women [mean age 28 (SD 2) years; mean weight 56 (SD 6) kg; mean height: 160 (SD 6) cm]. Interventions Ultrasound images from the anterior abdominal wall were recorded at rest (supine position) and during an abdominal isometric contraction, with the subject actively performing an abdominal crunch (crook lying position). Two-way analysis of variance was used to compare the inter-rectus distance between groups (postpartum vs control) and between levels of abdominal muscle activation (rest vs isometric contraction). Main outcome measures Inter-rectus distance 2 cm above the level of the umbilicus. Results The inter-rectus distance was significantly greater in the postpartum group compared with the control group [14.7 (SD 3.1) mm vs 9.6 (SD 2.8) mm; mean difference 5.1 mm; 95% confidence interval (CI) 3.4 to 6.8]. The inter-rectus distance was significantly lower during isometric contraction compared with rest [10.7 (SD 3.1) mm vs 13.4 (SD 3.1) mm; mean difference 2.8 mm; 95% CI 1.2 to 4.5]. No interaction was found between group and muscle contraction. Conclusions The inter-rectus distance was significantly higher in postpartum women compared with controls, and significantly lower during isometric contraction of the abdominal muscles (abdominal crunch) compared with rest.
    Physiotherapy 01/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Objective To explore the reported value of physiotherapy care received by patients who had accessed a Specialist Breast Care Physiotherapy Service. Design Exploratory qualitative study using in-depth interviews to explore aspects of physiotherapy care valued by breast cancer patients. Thematic network analysis was used to interpret the data and bring together the different experiences of the participants and identify common themes. Setting Physiotherapy Department at a NHS Foundation Trust Teaching Hospital. Participants: Nineteen participants were recruited and three were selected to take part in the in-depth interviews. All participants had received physiotherapy care from a Specialist Breast Care Physiotherapy Service and had been discharged within the last six months. Results Participants valued a patient-centred holistic approach to care and access to a Specialist Service with an experienced clinician. In particular the importance of the therapeutic alliance and the value of psychological, emotional and educational support emerged, with the participants feeling empowered in their recovery. Conclusion and clinical implications Participants reported an overall positive experience of their physiotherapy care. This study supports the need for service providers to evaluate their current physiotherapy provision and subsequently develop Specialised Services to meet the physiotherapy needs of breast cancer patients throughout all stages of their treatment pathway from the delivery of pre-operative care through to post-treatment follow-up.
    Physiotherapy 01/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Objective To explore the perceptions of novice physical therapy clinical instructors (CIs) about their interactions and teaching behaviours with physical therapy students. Design A phenomenological approach using semi-structured interviews and a focus group. Participants Six novice physical therapy CIs (less than 2 years as a CI and supervised fewer than three students) were recruited purposefully from a large metropolitan area in the USA. All participants were credentialled by the American Physical Therapy Association. Main outcome measures Transcripts of interview data and focus group data were analysed using interpretative analysis for themes and subthemes. Results Participants viewed the transition of students from the classroom to the clinic as their primary role, using strategies of ‘providing a way in’, ‘fostering critical thinking’, ‘finding a balance’, ‘overcoming barriers’ and ‘letting go’. Conclusion While novice CIs showed skill in fostering student reflection and providing orientation, they struggled with student autonomy and balancing the competing obligations of patient care and clinical instruction. They expressed issues related to anxiety and lack of confidence. In the future, novice CIs could benefit from training and support in these areas.
    Physiotherapy 01/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives Although exercise therapy is effective for reducing pain and activity limitations in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA), the underlying mechanisms are unclear. This study aimed to evaluate if improvements in neuromuscular factors (i.e. upper leg muscle strength and knee proprioception) underlie the beneficial effects of exercise therapy in patients with knee OA. Design Secondary analyses from a randomised controlled trial, with measurements at baseline, 6 weeks, 12 weeks and 38 weeks. Setting Rehabilitation centre. Participants One hundred and fifty-nine patients diagnosed with knee OA. Intervention Exercise therapy. Main outcome measures Changes in pain [numeric rating scale (NRS)] and activity limitations [Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) physical function subscale and get-up-and-go test] during the study period. Independent variables were changes in upper leg muscle strength and knee joint proprioception (i.e. motion sense) during the study period. Longitudinal regression analyses (generalised estimating equation) were performed to analyse associations between changes in upper leg muscle strength and knee proprioception with changes in pain and activity limitations. Results Improved muscle strength was significantly associated with reductions in NRS pain {B coefficient -2.5 [95% confidence interval (CI) -3.7 to -1.4], meaning that every change of 1 unit of strength was linked to a change of -2.5 units of pain}, WOMAC physical function (- 8.8, 95% CI -13.4 to -4.2) and get-up-and-go test (-1.7, 95% CI -2.4 to -1.0). Improved proprioception was not significantly associated with better outcomes of exercise therapy (P > 0.05). Conclusions Upper leg muscle strengthening is one of the mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects of exercise therapy in patients with knee OA.
    Physiotherapy 01/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Strong evidence exists for rehabilitation programmes following a cancer diagnosis, although little is known about their cost. The effects of an 8-week, physiotherapy-led, structured group intervention during the early survivorship phase were evaluated. Significant changes in quality of life and fatigue, and promising changes in fitness were found. The overall cost for this programme was €196 per participant, including the salaries of the clinicians, overheads and equipment costs. The modest costs associated with this programme may support more routine ‘cancer rehabilitation’, although more robust analyses are required.
    Physiotherapy 01/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Background Physiotherapeutic management of patients immediately following lumbar spinal surgery is common. However, there is considerable variability in the interventions provided. Objectives To assess the effect of peri-operative physiotherapeutic intervention in adults undergoing surgery for the management of degenerative lumbar conditions. Data sources The Cochrane Library, Medline, Embase, CINAHL and PEDro were searched from inception to August 2012. Study selection Randomised controlled trials investigating physiotherapeutic interventions prior to and immediately following surgery for degenerative lumbar conditions were included. Data extraction and synthesis Two reviewers extracted data independently using a standardised form. Risk of bias was assessed using a modified version of the Cochrane Collaboration tool. The quality of evidence was assessed using the GRADE approach, and the treatment effect size was calculated where comparable outcome measures were used across multiple trials. Results Four studies were included. There is very-low-quality evidence that pre- and post-operative exercise in addition to standard physiotherapeutic care may reduce pain, time taken to achieve post-operative functional milestones, and post-operative time off work. Results from one study indicated that there is no clear benefit or risk of harm from performing either prone or side-lying transfers. Conclusion and implications of key findings Very-low-quality evidence suggests that physiotherapy may improve pain and function following lumbar surgery. Due to low numbers of included studies and variation in the interventions assessed, the current evidence provides limited guidance for physiotherapeutic practice. Further research is required to determine the effectiveness of physiotherapeutic interventions in this population.
    Physiotherapy 01/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Background Cortical change, in the manner of cortical remapping is a common feature of and potential driver for chronic low back pain (CLBP). Novel interventions such as graded motor imagery (GMI) and mirror visual feedback (MVF) have been shown to facilitate correction of cortical changes and improve symptoms in other chronic pain states. However, little is known regarding the effectiveness of these treatment approaches in CLBP. Objective To identify and assess the current evidence regarding the effectiveness of interventions which target cortical remapping in the management of CLBP. Data Sources The electronic databases Medline, Embase, CINAHL, AMED, OVID, PEDro, BNI, PsycINFO, HMIC, and Cochrane library were systematically searched. Study Selection Of 11 potential citations identified, 5 articles were identified for inclusion and critiqued. These comprised 3 randomised controlled trials (RCTs), 1 randomised cross-over study, and 1 multiple case study design. Results Visualisation of lumbar movement may significantly improve movement-related pain severity and duration. A combined sensorimotor retraining approach has been shown to produce short-term improvements in both pain and disability outcomes in CLBP. The relative effectiveness of individual interventions and their long-term efficacy have yet to be established. Conclusions There is a paucity of robust literature which has examined the application and efficacy of these novel treatments in the management of CLBP. Results from the few CLBP studies which are available are encouraging. Further, robust research is needed to optimise treatment protocols and establish their long-term effectiveness in CLBP.
    Physiotherapy 01/2014;

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