Physiotherapy Journal Impact Factor & Information

Publisher: Chartered Society of Physiotherapy (Great Britain), Elsevier

Journal description

Physiotherapy aims to publish original research and facilitate continuing professional development for physiotherapists and other health professions worldwide. Dedicated to the advancement of physiotherapy through publication of research and scholarly work concerned with, but not limited to, its scientific basis and clinical application, education of practitioners, management of services and policy. We are pleased to receive articles reporting original scientific research, systematic or narrative reviews, educational, theoretical or debate articles, brief reports, case histories or single case studies. All papers should demonstrate methodological rigour. Physiotherapy is peer reviewed by an international panel.

Current impact factor: 2.11

Impact Factor Rankings

2015 Impact Factor Available summer 2015
2013 / 2014 Impact Factor 2.106
2012 Impact Factor 1.57
2011 Impact Factor 1.558
2010 Impact Factor 0.641
2009 Impact Factor 0.773
2008 Impact Factor 0.561
2007 Impact Factor 0.452

Impact factor over time

Impact factor
Year

Additional details

5-year impact 1.49
Cited half-life 0.00
Immediacy index 0.19
Eigenfactor 0.00
Article influence 0.41
Website Physiotherapy website
Other titles Physiotherapy (Online)
ISSN 1873-1465
OCLC 60630130
Material type Document, Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Elsevier

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Pre-print allowed on any website or open access repository
    • Voluntary deposit by author of authors post-print allowed on authors' personal website, arXiv.org or institutions open scholarly website including Institutional Repository, without embargo, where there is not a policy or mandate
    • Deposit due to Funding Body, Institutional and Governmental policy or mandate only allowed where separate agreement between repository and the publisher exists.
    • Permitted deposit due to Funding Body, Institutional and Governmental policy or mandate, may be required to comply with embargo periods of 12 months to 48 months .
    • Set statement to accompany deposit
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to journal home page or articles' DOI
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Articles in some journals can be made Open Access on payment of additional charge
    • NIH Authors articles will be submitted to PubMed Central after 12 months
    • Publisher last contacted on 18/10/2013
  • Classification
    ​ green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To explore the perceptions of physiotherapists towards the use of and participation in research. Concurrent mixed methods research, combining in-depth interviews with three questionnaires (demographics, Edmonton Research Orientation Survey, visual analogue scales for confidence and motivation to participate in research). One physiotherapy department in a rehabilitation hospital, consisting of seven specialised areas. Twenty-five subjects {four men and 21 women, mean age 38 [standard deviation (SD) 11] years} who had been registered as a physiotherapist for a mean period of 15 (SD 10) years participated in this study. They were registered with the New Zealand Board of Physiotherapy, held a current practising certificate, and were working as a physiotherapist or physiotherapy/allied health manager at the hospital. The primary outcome measure was in-depth interviews and the secondary outcome measures were the three questionnaires. Physiotherapists were generally positive towards research, but struggled with the concept of research, the available literature and the time to commit to research. Individual confidence and orientation towards research seemed to influence how these barriers were perceived. This study showed that physiotherapists struggle to implement research in their daily practice and become involved in research. Changing physiotherapists' conceptions of research, making it more accessible and providing dedicated research time could facilitate increased involvement in the physiotherapy profession. Copyright © 2015 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
    Physiotherapy 06/2015; DOI:10.1016/j.physio.2015.04.007
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The present study, taking a resource-oriented approach to mental health, aimed at investigating mental resilience and its determinants among undergraduate physiotherapy students using quantitative and qualitative tools. A questionnaire-based cross-sectional survey supplemented by 2 focus groups. One university in Hungary. 130 physiotherapy students at years 1, 2, and 3. Sense of coherence, a measure of dynamic self-esteem, as well as social support from family and peers were used to assess mental well-being. A screening instrument for psychological morbidity and perceived stress were used as deficiency-oriented approaches. Student opinions were gathered on positive and negative determinants of mental health. Resilience was lower [mean difference 4.8 (95% CI -3.4; 13.1)], and the occurrence of psychological morbidity (32.5% vs. 0%) was higher among female compared to male students. However, the proportion of students fully supported by their peers was higher among females (63% vs. 37.5%). Female students, unlike their male counterparts, experienced higher stress compared to their peers in the general population. Social support declined as students progressed in their studies though this proved to be the most important protective factor for their mental well-being. Results were fed back to the course organizers recommending the implementation of an evidence-based method to improve social support as delineated by the Guide to Community Preventive Services of the US the outcomes of which are to be seen in the future. Copyright © 2015 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
    Physiotherapy 06/2015; DOI:10.1016/j.physio.2015.05.002
  • Physiotherapy 06/2015; 101:e1360.
  • Physiotherapy 05/2015; 101. DOI:10.1016/j.physio.2015.03.022
  • Physiotherapy 05/2015; 101. DOI:10.1016/j.physio.2015.03.014
  • Physiotherapy 05/2015; 101. DOI:10.1016/j.physio.2015.03.009
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To compare inter-rectus distance (IRD) at rest between women who had a vaginal delivery with women who had a caesarean section, and to describe the effect of different abdominal exercises on IRD. Physiotherapy practice. Cross-sectional experimental study. Thirty-eight postpartum primiparous mothers with a singleton baby (vaginal delivery: n=23; caesarean section: n=15). Two-dimensional ultrasound images from the abdominal wall were recorded at rest and at the end position of abdominal crunch, drawing-in and drawing-in+abdominal crunch exercises. IRD measurements at rest, above and below the umbilicus, were compared between the two groups (vaginal delivery and caesarean section). IRD was also measured above and below the umbilicus during three abdominal exercises in both groups. IRD 2cm above and below the umbilicus. No significant differences in IRD, either above or below the umbilicus, were found between the vaginal delivery and caesarean section groups. IRD above the umbilicus was significantly reduced during abdominal crunch exercises compared with at rest {mean 21.7 [standard deviation (SD) 7.6]mm vs 25.9 (SD 9.0)mm; mean difference 4.2mm; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.5 to 7.9}. IRD below the umbilicus was significantly greater during drawing-in exercises compared with at rest [16.0 (SD 8.1)mm vs 11.4 (SD 4.9)mm; mean difference 4.5mm; 95% CI 1.6 to 7.4]. In contrast to existing recommendations for abdominal strength training among postpartum women, this study found that abdominal crunch exercises reduced IRD, and drawing-in exercises were ineffective for reducing IRD. Further basic studies and randomised controlled trials are warranted to explore the effect of abdominal training on IRD. Copyright © 2015 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
    Physiotherapy 05/2015; DOI:10.1016/j.physio.2015.04.004
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Background Chronic low back pain (CLBP) is highly prevalent (70%) in rural Nigeria and reinforces poverty and the rural-urban divide in Nigeria (Department for international development, 2012). Evidence based guidelines from developed countries advocate a paradigm shift towards a client-centred biopsychosocial approach (NICE, 2009). Applying this approach to a rural African context requires an in-depth understanding of the complex interaction between associated biological, psychological and social (biopsychosocial) factors and context-specific factors. Purpose To explore the experiences of adults with CLBP in rural Nigeria; and the management offered by consulted practitioners. This was in order to identify associated biopsychosocial factors and inform the development of a self-management programme for CLBP in rural Nigeria. Methods Patients with CLBP were purposively selected and screened. Qualitative semi-structured face-to-face interviews were conducted in Igbo. Data saturation was reached after 30 interviews. 12 practitioners identified by patients were similarly interviewed. The patients’ interview guide was based on the self-regulatory model of illness and explored their interpretation of back pain and coping strategies. The practitioners’ interview guide explored their management practices. Analysis involved verbatim transcription of interviews, forward and back-translation of Igbo transcripts. Thematic analysis of English transcripts using the Framework approach in NVivo followed these steps: familiarisation, identifying thematic framework, indexing, charting, mapping and interpretation. Results Most patients were aged 40-49 years, of Pentecostal religion, married, with primary education; 43% were illiterate. Practitioners included 3 ‘chemists’, 3 ‘herbalists’, 1 nurse, 1 doctor, 2 pastors and 2 physiotherapists. Patients’ Themes: Social construction of CLBP as a disease of hard labour and deprivation: Patients associated CLBP with adversity and unfavourable working and living environment. Family strain resulting from perceived impact of CLBP on gender roles: Females who had not conceived perceived their lack of success to be due to reduced fertility caused by CLBP. Males felt the worst effect of their back pain was their reduced ability to be physically intimate with their wives or provide for them. Coping by ‘waging war’ against CLBP: Participants coped by ‘escapism’, concealment, drug dependence or spirituality. Failure of orthodox management led to utilisation of unorthodox services: Patients perceived that biomedical services had failed them because they were inaccessible and ineffective. Unmet expectations: Patients were expecting ‘healing’ of their back pain spiritually, medically or through modification of their livelihood. Practitioners’ Themes Orthodox practitioners adopted the biomedical model while unorthodox practitioners adopted the biopsychosocial model in CLBP management No distinction in the management of acute and chronic back pain by orthodox practitioners while chronic back pain was perceived as ‘spiritual’ by unorthodox practitioners Competing services provided by unorthodox practitioners were preferred by patients resulting in their attrition from orthodox practice. Conclusions CLBP in rural Nigeria is a multi-dimensional experience hence its management should go beyond the biomedical model. Implications Physiotherapists in Nigeria need to differentiate between acute and chronic conditions and deliver treatment based on an understanding of the complex biopsychosocial factors associated with persistent conditions like CLBP. Community-based programmes for CLBP incorporating this understanding should be developed and tested in rural Nigeria.
    Physiotherapy 05/2015; Physiotherapy 101 · May 2015.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Background Chronic low back pain (CLBP) is highly prevalent (70%) in rural Nigeria and reinforces poverty and the rural-urban divide in Nigeria (Department for international development, 2012). Evidence based guidelines from developed countries advocate a paradigm shift towards a client-centred biopsychosocial approach (NICE, 2009). Applying this approach to a rural African context requires an in-depth understanding of the complex interaction between associated biological, psychological and social (biopsychosocial) factors and context-specific factors. Purpose To explore the experiences of adults with CLBP in rural Nigeria; and the management offered by consulted practitioners. This was in order to identify associated biopsychosocial factors and inform the development of a self-management programme for CLBP in rural Nigeria. Methods Patients with CLBP were purposively selected and screened. Qualitative semi-structured face-to-face interviews were conducted in Igbo. Data saturation was reached after 30 interviews. 12 practitioners identified by patients were similarly interviewed. The patients’ interview guide was based on the self-regulatory model of illness and explored their interpretation of back pain and coping strategies. The practitioners’ interview guide explored their management practices. Analysis involved verbatim transcription of interviews, forward and back-translation of Igbo transcripts. Thematic analysis of English transcripts using the Framework approach in NVivo followed these steps: familiarisation, identifying thematic framework, indexing, charting, mapping and interpretation. Results Most patients were aged 40-49 years, of Pentecostal religion, married, with primary education; 43% were illiterate. Practitioners included 3 ‘chemists’, 3 ‘herbalists’, 1 nurse, 1 doctor, 2 pastors and 2 physiotherapists. Patients’ Themes: Social construction of CLBP as a disease of hard labour and deprivation: Patients associated CLBP with adversity and unfavourable working and living environment. Family strain resulting from perceived impact of CLBP on gender roles: Females who had not conceived perceived their lack of success to be due to reduced fertility caused by CLBP. Males felt the worst effect of their back pain was their reduced ability to be physically intimate with their wives or provide for them. Coping by ‘waging war’ against CLBP: Participants coped by ‘escapism’, concealment, drug dependence or spirituality. Failure of orthodox management led to utilisation of unorthodox services: Patients perceived that biomedical services had failed them because they were inaccessible and ineffective. Unmet expectations: Patients were expecting ‘healing’ of their back pain spiritually, medically or through modification of their livelihood. Practitioners’ Themes Orthodox practitioners adopted the biomedical model while unorthodox practitioners adopted the biopsychosocial model in CLBP management No distinction in the management of acute and chronic back pain by orthodox practitioners while chronic back pain was perceived as ‘spiritual’ by unorthodox practitioners Competing services provided by unorthodox practitioners were preferred by patients resulting in their attrition from orthodox practice. Conclusions CLBP in rural Nigeria is a multi-dimensional experience hence its management should go beyond the biomedical model. Implications Physiotherapists in Nigeria need to differentiate between acute and chronic conditions and deliver treatment based on an understanding of the complex biopsychosocial factors associated with persistent conditions like CLBP. Community-based programmes for CLBP incorporating this understanding should be developed and tested in rural Nigeria.
    Physiotherapy 05/2015; Physiotherapy 05/2015(Physiotherapy 101 ·).
  • Physiotherapy 05/2015; 101e:1105. DOI:10.1016/j.physio.2015.03.2002
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Background Disability from chronic conditions poses a great burden on the health and economy of most African Countries (Louw et al., 2007). Non-specific chronic low back pain (CLBP) is a common cause of disability in Nigeria. Its impact in rural Nigeria is crucial due to poverty and limited access to health services (Department for international development, 2012, International Fund for Agricultural Development, 2012). Observational studies identified biological, psychological and social (biopsychosocial) factors associated with disability in developed countries. These factors have been targeted in interventions based on evidence-based guidelines (NICE, 2009) to reduce CLBP disability. Evidence suggests that the constituents and impact of these factors may vary in different contexts. No studies have explored these in relation to CLBP in rural Africa. Purpose To identify the biopsychosocial factors associated with disability in people with CLBP in rural Nigeria. Methods This was an exploratory cross-sectional study of 200 rural community dwelling adults with CLBP in Enugu state, South-eastern Nigeria. Stratified multistage cluster sampling (using area maps) was used to select 10 rural communities. Ten community health workers, trained for interviewer-administration of measures were randomly assigned to collect data from these communities. Fidelity checks showed compliance with data collection protocols. Questionnaires were cross-culturally adapted and validated for interviewer-administration. The criterion variable was disability (Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire); predictor variables were: pain (11-point box scale), anxiety, depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale), coping (Coping Strategies Questionnaire), social support (Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support), biomechanical factors (Occupational Risk Factor Questionnaire), illness perceptions (Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire) and fear avoidance beliefs (Fear Avoidance Beliefs Questionnaire). Data were assessed for normality visually and statistically. Correlations were used to assess strength of relationship between variables and disability. Multiple regression analysis uncovered the unique variance explained by each significant predictor. Results Slightly over half (56%) of the participants were females. Mean age was 48.6 years (SD=12.03), years of education was 6.95 years (SD=6.42). Majority were married (71.5%) and self-employed (62.5%). Pain, anxiety, depression, illness perceptions, fear avoidance beliefs and all coping strategies had significant positive correlation with disability. Of these, the strongest correlates were pain, anxiety, illness perceptions and fear avoidance beliefs. Biomechanical factors had a significant weak negative correlation with disability while social support had no significant correlation with disability. The significant correlates were entered into a hierarchical multiple regression controlling for demographic characteristics (sex, age, education) significantly associated with disability. A significant model emerged (R2change=0.50, F(7, 189)=37.39, p<0.0005) explaining 62% of the variance in disability (Adjusted R2=0.62). Illness perceptions (β=0.30; p<0.0005), pain (β=0.25; p<0.0005), catastrophizing (β=0.21; p=0.001), fear avoidance beliefs (β=0.20; p=0.001) and anxiety (β=0.14; p=0.034) were significant predictors with positive relationships to disability. Conclusions Psychosocial factors are important predictors of disability in people with CLBP in rural Nigeria. Results suggest the need for a shift from a biomedical model to a more client-centred, biopsychosocial approach addressing these factors in the physiotherapy management of CLBP in Nigeria. Implications The development of interventions to target these factors may improve evidence-informed physiotherapy management of CLBP in Nigeria
    Physiotherapy 05/2015; Physiotherapy 101 · May 2015(Physiotherapy 101 · May 2015).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Background Disability from chronic conditions poses a great burden on the health and economy of most African Countries (Louw et al., 2007). Non-specific chronic low back pain (CLBP) is a common cause of disability in Nigeria. Its impact in rural Nigeria is crucial due to poverty and limited access to health services (Department for international development, 2012, International Fund for Agricultural Development, 2012). Observational studies identified biological, psychological and social (biopsychosocial) factors associated with disability in developed countries. These factors have been targeted in interventions based on evidence-based guidelines (NICE, 2009) to reduce CLBP disability. Evidence suggests that the constituents and impact of these factors may vary in different contexts. No studies have explored these in relation to CLBP in rural Africa. Purpose To identify the biopsychosocial factors associated with disability in people with CLBP in rural Nigeria. Methods This was an exploratory cross-sectional study of 200 rural community dwelling adults with CLBP in Enugu state, South-eastern Nigeria. Stratified multistage cluster sampling (using area maps) was used to select 10 rural communities. Ten community health workers, trained for interviewer-administration of measures were randomly assigned to collect data from these communities. Fidelity checks showed compliance with data collection protocols. Questionnaires were cross-culturally adapted and validated for interviewer-administration. The criterion variable was disability (Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire); predictor variables were: pain (11-point box scale), anxiety, depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale), coping (Coping Strategies Questionnaire), social support (Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support), biomechanical factors (Occupational Risk Factor Questionnaire), illness perceptions (Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire) and fear avoidance beliefs (Fear Avoidance Beliefs Questionnaire). Data were assessed for normality visually and statistically. Correlations were used to assess strength of relationship between variables and disability. Multiple regression analysis uncovered the unique variance explained by each significant predictor. Results Slightly over half (56%) of the participants were females. Mean age was 48.6 years (SD=12.03), years of education was 6.95 years (SD=6.42). Majority were married (71.5%) and self-employed (62.5%). Pain, anxiety, depression, illness perceptions, fear avoidance beliefs and all coping strategies had significant positive correlation with disability. Of these, the strongest correlates were pain, anxiety, illness perceptions and fear avoidance beliefs. Biomechanical factors had a significant weak negative correlation with disability while social support had no significant correlation with disability. The significant correlates were entered into a hierarchical multiple regression controlling for demographic characteristics (sex, age, education) significantly associated with disability. A significant model emerged (R2change=0.50, F(7, 189)=37.39, p<0.0005) explaining 62% of the variance in disability (Adjusted R2=0.62). Illness perceptions (β=0.30; p<0.0005), pain (β=0.25; p<0.0005), catastrophizing (β=0.21; p=0.001), fear avoidance beliefs (β=0.20; p=0.001) and anxiety (β=0.14; p=0.034) were significant predictors with positive relationships to disability. Conclusions Psychosocial factors are important predictors of disability in people with CLBP in rural Nigeria. Results suggest the need for a shift from a biomedical model to a more client-centred, biopsychosocial approach addressing these factors in the physiotherapy management of CLBP in Nigeria. Implications The development of interventions to target these factors may improve evidence-informed physiotherapy management of CLBP in Nigeria
    Physiotherapy 05/2015; Physiotherapy 05/2015;(Physiotherapy 101).