International journal of psychophysiology: official journal of the International Organization of Psychophysiology Impact Factor & Information

Publisher: Elsevier

Journal description

Current impact factor: 2.65

Impact Factor Rankings

2015 Impact Factor Available summer 2015
2013 / 2014 Impact Factor 2.648
2012 Impact Factor 2.036
2011 Impact Factor 2.144
2010 Impact Factor 2.378
2009 Impact Factor 3.045
2008 Impact Factor 2.264
2007 Impact Factor 2.205
2006 Impact Factor 2.247
2005 Impact Factor 2.584
2004 Impact Factor 1.563
2003 Impact Factor 2.014
2002 Impact Factor 2.055
2001 Impact Factor 1.747
2000 Impact Factor 1.489
1999 Impact Factor 1.829
1998 Impact Factor 1.148
1997 Impact Factor 0.703
1996 Impact Factor 1.089
1995 Impact Factor 0.585
1994 Impact Factor 0.875
1993 Impact Factor 0.684
1992 Impact Factor 0.87

Impact factor over time

Impact factor
Year

Additional details

5-year impact 0.00
Cited half-life 6.80
Immediacy index 0.49
Eigenfactor 0.01
Article influence 0.94
ISSN 1872-7697

Publisher details

Elsevier

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Authors pre-print on any website, including arXiv and RePEC
    • Author's post-print on author's personal website immediately
    • Author's post-print on open access repository after an embargo period of between 12 months and 48 months
    • Permitted deposit due to Funding Body, Institutional and Governmental policy or mandate, may be required to comply with embargo periods of 12 months to 48 months
    • Author's post-print may be used to update arXiv and RepEC
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Must link to publisher version with DOI
    • Author's post-print must be released with a Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No Derivatives License
    • Publisher last reviewed on 03/06/2015
  • Classification
    ​ green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: One promising avenue toward a better understanding of the pathophysiology of positive emotional disturbances is to examine high-frequency heart rate variability (HRV-HF), which has been implicated as a potential physiological index of disturbances in positive emotional functioning. To date, only a few psychopathology relevant studies have systematically quantified HRV-HF profiles using more ecologically valid methods in everyday life. Using an experience-sampling approach, the present study examined both mean levels and intra-individual variability of HRV-HF - as well as comparison measures of cardiovascular arousal, sympathetic activity, and gross somatic movement - in everyday life, using ambulatory psychophysiological measurement across a six-day consecutive period among a spectrum of community adult participants with varying degrees of positive valence system disturbance, including adults with bipolar I disorder (BD; n=21), major depressive disorder (MDD; n=17), and healthy non-psychiatric controls (CTL; n=28). Groups did not differ in mean HRV-HF, but greater HRV-HF instability (i.e., intra-individual variation in HRV-HF) was found in the BD compared to both MDD and CTL groups. Subsequent analyses suggested that group differences in HRV-HF variability were largely accounted for by variations in clinician-rated manic symptoms. However, no association was found between HRV-HF variability and dimensional measures of positive affectivity. This work provides evidence consistent with a quadratic relationship between HRV-HF and positive emotional disturbance and represents a valuable step toward developing a more ecologically valid model of positive valence system disturbances and their underlying psychophysiological mechanisms within an RDoC framework. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.
    International journal of psychophysiology: official journal of the International Organization of Psychophysiology 08/2015; DOI:10.1016/j.ijpsycho.2015.08.005
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    ABSTRACT: The Research Domain Criteria (RDoC), developed by the National Institute of Mental Health as a neuroscience-informed alternative to traditional psychiatric nosology, is an explicitly dimensional system in which classification of psychopathology is derived inductively (i.e., from basic science), across multiple levels of analysis (e.g., genetic, neural, psychophysiological, behavioral). Although RDoC is often presented as paradigmatically revolutionary, a review of the history of psychophysiology suggests that roots of RDoC thinking extend at least as far back as the mid-20th Century. In this paper, we briefly and selectively review the historical emergence of neurobiologically-informed dimensional trait models of psychopathology, and we summarize our thinking regarding high frequency heart rate variability (HF-HRV) as a transdiagnostic biomarker of self-regulation and cognitive control. When functional interactions between HF-HRV and systems of behavioral approach and avoidance are considered, diverse patterns of behavioral maladjustment can be subsumed into a single model. This model accommodates the general bifactor structure of psychopathology, and suggests that HF-HRV can be viewed as an autonomic, transdiagnostic biomarker of mental illness. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.
    International journal of psychophysiology: official journal of the International Organization of Psychophysiology 08/2015; DOI:10.1016/j.ijpsycho.2015.08.004
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    ABSTRACT: A brief silent gap embedded in an otherwise continuous sound is missed by a human listener when it falls below a certain threshold: the gap detection threshold. This can be interpreted as an indicator that auditory perception is a non-continuous process, during which acoustic input is fragmented into a discrete chain of events. Current research provides evidence for a covariation between rhythmic properties of speech and ongoing rhythmic activity in the brain. Therefore, the discretization of acoustic input is thought to facilitate speech processing. Ongoing oscillations in the auditory cortex are suggested to represent a neuronal mechanism which implements the discretization process and leads to a limited auditory temporal resolution. Since gap detection thresholds seem to vary considerably between individuals, the present study addresses the question of whether individual differences in the frequency of underlying ongoing oscillatory mechanisms can be associated with auditory temporal resolution. To address this question we determined an individual gap detection threshold and a preferred oscillatory frequency for each participant. The preferred frequency of the auditory cortex was identified using an auditory steady state response (ASSR) paradigm: amplitude-modulated sounds with modulation frequencies in the gamma range were presented binaurally; the frequency which elicited the largest spectral amplitude was considered the preferred oscillatory frequency. Our results show that individuals with higher preferred auditory frequencies perform significantly better in the gap detection task. Moreover, this correlation between oscillation frequency and gap detection was supported by high test-retest reliabilities for gap detection thresholds as well as preferred frequencies. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.
    International journal of psychophysiology: official journal of the International Organization of Psychophysiology 08/2015; DOI:10.1016/j.ijpsycho.2015.08.003
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Recent research demonstrated structural overlap between reward and self processing, but the functional relationship that explains how self processing influences reward processing remains unclear. The present study used an experimentally constrained reflection task to investigate whether individuals' outcome evaluations in a gambling task are modulated by task-unrelated self- and other-reflection processes. The self- and other-reflection task contained descriptions of the self or others, and brain event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded while 16 normal adults performed a gambling task. The ERP analysis focused on the feedback-related negativity (FRN) component. We found that the difference wave of FRN increased in the self-reflection condition compared with the other-reflection condition. The present findings provide direct evidence that self processing can influence reward processing. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.
    International journal of psychophysiology: official journal of the International Organization of Psychophysiology 08/2015; DOI:10.1016/j.ijpsycho.2015.08.001
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    ABSTRACT: The phasic orienting reflex (OR) was investigated using single-trial data collected concurrently from 4 autonomic measures and event-related potentials (ERPs). In an auditory dishabituation paradigm, twelve indifferent tones of two intensities (60 or 80dB, intensity change on trial 11, counterbalanced between subjects) were presented at very long interstimulus intervals (ISIs). Novelty and intensity based stimulus-response patterns were examined seeking ERP analogues of autonomic measures representing pre-OR and OR processing. Skin conductance response (SCR) represented the phasic OR index. EOG-corrected ERP data for 16 subjects were decomposed by a temporal Principal Components Analysis (PCA). SCR diminished over 10 standard trials, recovered on change trial 11, dishabituated to the re-presentation of the standard tone on trial 12, and showed intensity effects at the change - formal requirements for an OR index. The evoked cardiac response (HR) showed no trial or intensity effects. Respiratory pause (RP) decreased linearly over trials and showed recovery but no dishabituation or intensity effect. Peripheral Vasoconstriction (PVC) failed to decrement but exhibited an intensity effect. Ten identifiable ERP components were extracted: Na, P1, N1-1, PN, P2, P3a, P3b, a novelty-sensitive HabP3, an intensity-sensitive IntP3, and the Slow Wave (SW). Pattern 1 showed no trial or intensity effects (HR, P1, PN, P2); Pattern 2 showed no trial effect but an intensity effect (PVC, Na, N1-1, P3a); and Pattern 3 demonstrated habituation and an intensity effect (SCR, RP, P3b, HabP3, IntP3, SW). The observed fractionation of autonomic and central measures is consistent with Preliminary Process Theory (PPT) rather than the notion of a unitary OR. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.
    International journal of psychophysiology: official journal of the International Organization of Psychophysiology 08/2015; DOI:10.1016/j.ijpsycho.2015.08.002
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: After successful extinction of conditioned fear, the presentation of an unsignaled unconditioned stimulus (US) leads to return of fear, thus, the previously extinguished conditioned stimulus (CS) triggers fear responses again. Human studies on such reinstatement processes are still inconclusive. Some revealed a general increase of fear reactions, both to the fear (CS+) and the safety stimulus (CS-), whereas other studies discovered a differential return of fear with enhanced fear responses to the CS+ only. Moreover, we know little about reinstatement of contextual anxiety, a state of general anxious apprehension and chronic worry. Therefore, the present study investigated reinstatement of contextual anxiety with an ecological valid virtual reality (VR) design. Additionally, we examined whether the current state anxiety might modulate the reinstatement of contextual anxiety. To this end, two groups underwent context conditioning on Day 1, i.e., one context (CXT+) became paired with unpredictable USs, but not the other context (CXT-), and an extinction training on Day 2. On Day 3 a reinstatement test was conducted, i.e., one group (reinstatement group, n=21) received one unsignaled US before testing, whereas the control group (n=21) did not. Only the reinstatement group showed a differential return of contextual anxiety as measured by fear-potentiated startle and anxiety ratings. Interestingly, the reinstatement of fear-potentiated startle was additionally influenced by state anxiety. Conclusively, an anxious state before an unsignaled aversive event might favor a return of contextual anxiety. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.
    International journal of psychophysiology: official journal of the International Organization of Psychophysiology 07/2015; DOI:10.1016/j.ijpsycho.2015.07.013
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    ABSTRACT: Caring for offspring with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is associated with chronic stress. Such a situation could alter body homeostasis, and in turn, physiological systems associated with the stress response and health, such as the autonomic nervous system. The primary aim of the present study was to compare the cardiovascular response to a set of mental tasks in parents of people with (n=34) and without (n=36) ASD. The secondary aim was to explore a potential relationship between cardiovascular response and self-reported health. Caregivers had lower sympathetic activity than non-caregivers, especially during the acute stress period. Higher sympathetic activity was related to more self-reported somatic symptoms in caregivers. Further, caregivers were found to have lower sympathetic reactivity to the stressor, probably due to an adaptation mechanism. Such adaptation could be extremely important for protecting the health of caregivers. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.
    International journal of psychophysiology: official journal of the International Organization of Psychophysiology 07/2015; DOI:10.1016/j.ijpsycho.2015.07.011
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    ABSTRACT: Prospective memory involves the formation and execution of intended actions and is essential for autonomous living. In this study (N=32), the effect of the nature of PM cues (semantic versus perceptual) on established event-related potentials (ERP) elicited in PM tasks (N300 and prospective positivity) was investigated. PM cues defined by their perceptual features clearly elicited the N300 and prospective positivity whereas PM cues defined by semantic relatedness elicited prospective positivity. This calls into question the view that the N300 is a marker of general processes underlying detection of PM cues, but supports existing research showing that prospective positivity represents general post-retrieval processes that follow detection of PM cues. Continued refinement of ERP paradigms for understanding the neural correlates of PM is needed. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.
    International journal of psychophysiology: official journal of the International Organization of Psychophysiology 07/2015; DOI:10.1016/j.ijpsycho.2015.07.012
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Nonlinear measures can capture the complex structure of the heart beating, and recordings taken while the individual performs daily activities may help to understand the cardiac system's output in natural conditions. As healthy systems are characterized by having highly complex outputs, we hypothesized that the cardiac output from high anxious adolescents should be less complex than the output from their low anxious counterparts. In this study ECG was recorded for two hours in 50 adolescents while they performed regular school activities. Fractal dimension (FD), scaling exponents and multiscale entropy were calculated on the interbeat intervals time series. Both FD and entropy were significantly lower in the high-anxious group than the low-anxious group. These results suggest different heart-related regulation in adolescents who suffered from high anxious symptomatology. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.
    International journal of psychophysiology: official journal of the International Organization of Psychophysiology 07/2015; DOI:10.1016/j.ijpsycho.2015.07.007
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    ABSTRACT: This study investigated the subjective visual acuity by recording ERPs elicited by task-irrelevant visual changes. Optotypes stimuli were presented in the center of the visual field at three threshold levels (supra-threshold, threshold and sub-threshold) while participants were listening to stories. The results showed that neither vMMN nor P3a component was elicited by optotypes stimuli on the sub-threshold condition, whereas, vMMN was elicited under supra-threshold and threshold conditions, with no significant differences between those vMMN amplitudes of two conditions. The P3a amplitude was larger for supra-threshold condition than that for threshold condition. These data demonstrated that the emergence of vMMN could only reflect the automatic detection of orientation-changes in the supra-threshold and threshold conditions compared to the sub-threshold condition, whereas the P3a amplitude could reflect the difference in processing of supra-threshold and threshold stimuli. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.
    International journal of psychophysiology: official journal of the International Organization of Psychophysiology 07/2015; DOI:10.1016/j.ijpsycho.2015.07.010
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    ABSTRACT: Scalp event-related potential (ERP) studies have demonstrated larger N170 amplitudes when subjects view faces compared to items from object categories. Extensive attempts have been made to clarify face selectivity and hemispheric dominance for face processing. The purpose of this study was to investigate hemispheric differences in N170s activated by human faces and non-face objects, as well as the extent of overlap of their sources. ERP was recorded from 20 subjects while they viewed human face and non-face images. N170s obtained during the presentation of human faces appeared earlier and with larger amplitude than for other category images. Further source analysis with a two-dipole model revealed that the locations of face and object processing largely overlapped in the left hemisphere. Conversely, the source for face processing in the right hemisphere located more anterior than the source for object processing. The results suggest that the neuronal circuits for face and object processing are largely shared in the left hemisphere, with more distinct circuits in the right hemisphere. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.
    International journal of psychophysiology: official journal of the International Organization of Psychophysiology 07/2015; DOI:10.1016/j.ijpsycho.2015.07.008
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    ABSTRACT: Whilst a number of previous studies have been conducted in order to investigate functional brain changes associated with eyes-closed meditation techniques, there is a relative scarcity in the literature with regards to changes occurring during eyes-open meditiation. The current project used magnetoencephalography (MEG) to investigate differences in spectral power and functional connectivity between 11 long-term mindfulness meditators (LTMMs) with >5years of experience and 12 meditation-naïve control participants both during baseline eyes-open rest and eyes-open open-monitoring (OM) mindfulness meditation. During resting with eyes-open, prior to meditating, greater mean alpha power was observed for LTMMs in comparison to controls. However, during the course of OM meditation, a significantly greater increase in theta power was observed over a broad fronto-centro-parietal region for control participants in comparison to LTMMs. In contrast, whole-head mean connectivity was found to be significantly greater for long-term meditators in comparison to controls in the theta band both during rest as well as during meditation. Additionally, mean connectivity was significantly lower for long-term meditators in the low gamma band during rest and significantly lower in both low and high gamma bands during meditation; and the variance of low-gamma connectivity scores for long-term meditators was significantly decreased compared to the control group. The current study provides important new information as to the trait functional changes in brain activity associated with long-term mindfulness meditation, as well as the state changes specifically associated with eyes-open open monitoring meditation techniques. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.
    International journal of psychophysiology: official journal of the International Organization of Psychophysiology 07/2015; DOI:10.1016/j.ijpsycho.2015.07.006
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    ABSTRACT: Converging neuroscientific and psychological evidence points to several transdiagnostic factors that cut across DSM-defined disorders, which both affect and are affected by executive dysfunction. Two of these factors, anxious apprehension and anxious arousal, have helped bridge the gap between psychological and neurobiological models of anxiety. The present integration of diverse findings advances an understanding of the relationships between these transdiagnostic anxiety dimensions, their interactions with each other and executive function, and their neural mechanisms. Additionally, a discussion is provided concerning how these constructs fit within the Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) matrix developed by the National Institutes of Mental Health and how they relate to other anxiety constructs studied with different methods and at other units of analysis. Suggestions for future research are offered, including how to (1) improve measurement and delineation of these constructs, (2) use new neuroimaging methods and theoretical approaches of how the brain functions to build neural mechanistic models of these constructs, and (3) advance understanding of the relationships of these constructs to diverse emotional phenomena and executive functions. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.
    International journal of psychophysiology: official journal of the International Organization of Psychophysiology 07/2015; DOI:10.1016/j.ijpsycho.2015.07.001
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    ABSTRACT: Low voltage EEG (LVEEG) is a heritable phenotype that differs depending on ancestral heritage, yet its impact on brain networks and cognition remain relatively unexplored. In this study we assessed energy and task related phase locking of event-related oscillation (EROs), behavioral responses, measures of IQ and personality, and expected responses to alcohol in a large sample of individuals with LVEEG compared to those with higher voltage variants. Participants (n=762) were recruited from a Native American community and completed a diagnostic interview, the Quick Test, the Subjective High Assessment scale (SHAS-E) and the Maudsley Personality Inventory. Clinical and spectral analyzed EEGs were collected for determination of the presence of a LVEEG variant. EROs were generated using a facial expression recognition task. Participants with LVEEG (n=451) were significantly more likely to be older, married and have higher degrees of Native American heritage but did not differ in gender, income or education. Individuals with LVEEG were also found to have decreased energy in their alpha EROs, increased phase locking between stimulus trials, and increased phase-locking between cortical brain areas. No significant differences in the cognitive tests, personality variables or alcohol dependence or anxiety diagnoses were found, however, individuals with LVEEG did report a larger number of drinks ever consumed in a 24-hr period and a less intense expected response to alcohol. These data suggest that alpha power in the resting EEG is highly associated with energy and cortical connectivity measures generated by event-related stimuli, as well as potentially increased risk for alcohol use. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.
    International journal of psychophysiology: official journal of the International Organization of Psychophysiology 07/2015; DOI:10.1016/j.ijpsycho.2015.07.002
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    ABSTRACT: There is substantial variability across individuals in the magnitudes of their skin conductance (SC) responses during the acquisition and extinction of conditioned fear. To manage this variability, subjects may be matched for demographic variables, such as age, gender and education. However, limited data exist addressing how much variability in conditioned SC responses is actually explained by these variables. The present study assessed the influence of age, gender and education on the SC responses of 222 subjects who underwent the same differential conditioning paradigm. The demographic variables were found to predict a small but significant amount of variability in conditioned responding during fear acquisition, but not fear extinction learning or extinction recall. A larger differential change in SC during acquisition was associated with more education. Older participants and women showed smaller differential SC during acquisition. Our findings support the need to consider age, gender and education when studying fear acquisition but not necessarily when examining fear extinction learning and recall. Variability in demographic factors across studies may partially explain the difficulty in reproducing some SC findings. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.
    International journal of psychophysiology: official journal of the International Organization of Psychophysiology 07/2015; DOI:10.1016/j.ijpsycho.2015.06.010
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    ABSTRACT: Patients with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) show persistent fear responses to trauma cues in contexts in which these cues no longer predict danger. This might be related to deficient context and enhanced cue conditioning. To test this hypothesis, we examined context conditioning directly followed by a cue conditioning phase against the background of the previously conditioned context in 12 patients with PTSD, 14 traumatized control subjects without PTSD and 11 matched never-traumatized controls. We used differential context and cue conditioning paradigms, with rooms as contexts and geometric figures as cues, and assessed valence, arousal and contingency ratings as well as brain responses using functional magnetic resonance imaging. The PTSD patients showed more hippocampal activation and differentiated the threat and safe contexts less in their contingency ratings than the healthy controls during context acquisition. In the subsequent cue acquisition against the background of the conditioned context, they displayed similar threat versus safe cue differentiation in contingency ratings as the two control groups. Moreover, PTSD patients failed to extinguish the differential conditioned context and cued fear responses and showed increased fear to both the dangerous and the safe conditioned contexts and cues in some subjective ratings. This study provides evidence for a dissociation of brain responses and contingency awareness in PTSD which represents impaired context learning and a deficient contextual modulation of cue-related associations. In addition, extinction and extinction recall were impaired in PTSD. These changes were related to PTSD symptoms and suggest that contextual learning deficits may contribute to PTSD. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.
    International journal of psychophysiology: official journal of the International Organization of Psychophysiology 07/2015; DOI:10.1016/j.ijpsycho.2015.06.009