Archives of gerontology and geriatrics

Publisher: Elsevier

Description

  • Impact factor
    1.36
  • 5-year impact
    1.57
  • Cited half-life
    5.60
  • Immediacy index
    0.27
  • Eigenfactor
    0.00
  • Article influence
    0.40
  • ISSN
    1872-6976

Publisher details

Elsevier

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    • NIH Authors articles will be submitted to PubMed Central after 12 months
    • Publisher last contacted on 18/10/2013
  • Classification
    ​ green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Falls are a common occurrence amongst older adults yet participation in prevention strategies is often poor. Although older adults may perceive a strategy works in general, they may not participate because they feel it will not benefit them personally. We aimed to describe how frequently and why older adults identify falls prevention strategies as being “better for others than for me”. A cross-sectional survey with n = 394 community-dwelling older adults in Victoria, Australia was undertaken. Participants were provided with detailed descriptions of four evidence-based falls prevention strategies and for each were asked whether they felt that the strategy would be effective in preventing falls for people like them, and then whether they felt that the strategy would be effective for preventing falls for them personally. Follow-up questions asked why they thought the strategy would be more effective for people like them than for them personally where this was the case. We found the “better for others than for me” perception was present for between 25% and 34% of the strategies investigated. Participants commonly said they felt this way because they did not think they were at risk of falls, and because they were doing other activities they thought would provide equivalent benefit. Strategies to promote participation in evidence-based falls prevention strategies may need to convince older adults that they are at risk of falls and that what activities they are already doing may not provide adequate protection against falls in order to have greater effect.
    Archives of gerontology and geriatrics 07/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: The Tilburg Frailty Indicator (TFI) is a self-administered questionnaire with a bio-psycho-social integrated approach that measures the degree of frailty in elderly persons. The TFI was developed in the Netherlands and tested in a population of elderly Dutch men and women. The aim of this study was to translate and culturally adapt the TFI to a Danish context, and to test face validity of the Danish version by cognitive interviewing. An internationally recognized procedure was applied as a basis for the translation process. The primary tasks were forward translation, reconciliation, back translation, harmonization and pretest. Pretest and review of the preliminary version by cognitive interviewing, were performed at a local community centre and in an acute medical ward at the University Hospital in Aalborg, Denmark respectively. A large agreement regarding meaning of the items in the forward translation and reconciliation process was seen. Minor discrepancies were solved by consensus. Back translation revealed unclear wording in one matter. The harmonization committee agreed on a version for cognitive interviewing after revision of minor issues and thirty-four participants were interviewed. Two issues became evident and these were revised. The cognitive interviews and final lay-out resulted in minor adjustments as text type size, specific font, and lining for optimizing readability. In conclusion, we consider the TFI to be translated in such rigorous manner that the instrument can be further tested in clinical practice. The overall objective of the questionnaire being to identify frailty and improve the interventions relating to frail elderly persons in Denmark.
    Archives of gerontology and geriatrics 07/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Recruitment and retention of frail elderly in research studies can be difficult. Objective To identify challenges and strategies pertaining to recruitment and retention of frail elderly in research studies. Methods A systematic review was conducted. Four databases (MEDLINE, CINAHL, AgeLine, Embase) were searched from January 1992 to December 2012. Empirical studies were included if they explored barriers to or strategies for recruitment or retention of adults aged 60-plus who were identified as frail, vulnerable or housebound. Two researchers independently determined the eligibility of each abstract reviewed and assessed the level of evidence presented. Data concerning challenges encountered (type and impact) and strategies used (type and impact) were abstracted. Results Of 916 articles identified in the searches, 15 met the inclusion criteria. The level of evidence of the studies retained varied from poor to good. Lack of perceived benefit, distrust of research staff, poor health and mobility problems were identified as common challenges. The most frequently reported strategies used were to establish a partnership with staff that participants knew and trusted, and be flexible about the time and place of the study. However, few studies performed analyses to compare the impact of specific challenges and strategies on refusal or drop-out rates. Conclusions This review highlights the need to improve knowledge about the impact of barriers and strategies on recruitment and retention of frail older adults. This knowledge will help to develop innovative and cost-effective ways to increase and maintain participation, which may improve the generalizability of research findings to this population.
    Archives of gerontology and geriatrics 07/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Studies on the relationship between behavioral competence, such as the competence of exerting out-of-home behavior (OOHB), and well-being in older adults have rarely addressed cognitive status as a potentially moderating factor. We included 35 persons with early-stage dementia of the Alzheimer‘s type (DAT), 76 individuals with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and 146 cognitively healthy (CH) study participants (grand mean age: M = 72.9 years; SD = 6.4 years). OOHB indicators were assessed based on a multi-method assessment strategy, using both GPS (Global Positioning System) tracking technology and structured self-reports. Environmental mastery and positive as well as negative affect served as well-being indicators and were assessed by established questionnaires. Three theoretically postulated OOHB dimensions of different complexity (out-of-home walking behavior, global out-of-home mobility, and out-of-home activities) were supported by confirmatory factor analysis. We also found in the DAT group that environmental mastery was substantially and positively related to less complex out-of-home walking behavior, which was not the case in MCI and CH individuals. In contrast, more complex out-of-home activities were associated with higher negative affect in the DAT as well as the MCI group, but not in CH persons. These findings point to the possibility that relationships between out-of-home behavior and well-being depend on the congruence between available cognitive resources and the complexity of the OOHB dimension considered.
    Archives of gerontology and geriatrics 07/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Very frail elderly patients living in the community, present complex needs and have a higher rate of hospital admissions with emergency department (ED) visits. Here, we evaluated the impact on hospital admissions of the COPA model (CO-ordination Personnes Agées), which provides integrated primary care with intensive case management for community-dwelling, very frail elderly patients. We used a quasi-experimental study in an urban district of Paris with four hundred twenty-eight very frail patients (105 in the intervention group and 323 in the control group) with one-year follow-up. The primary outcome measures were the presence of any unplanned hospitalization (via the ED), any planned hospitalizations (direct admission, no ED visit) and any hospitalization overall. Secondary outcome measures included health parameters assessed with the RAI-HC (Resident Assessment Instrument-Home Care). Comparing the intervention group with the control group, the risk of having at least one unplanned hospital admission decreased at one year and the planned hospital admissions rate increased, without a significant change in total hospital admissions. Among patients in the intervention group, there was less risk of depression and dyspnea. The COPA model improves the quality of care provided to very frail elderly patients by reducing unplanned hospitalizations and improving some health parameters.
    Archives of gerontology and geriatrics 05/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to evaluate factors associated with tooth loss in older Taiwanese adults with different numbers of remaining teeth. This study evaluated oral health status and tooth loss among 2286 adults aged over 65. Subjects were classified according to number of teeth (Group 1 < 20 teeth vs. Group 2 ≥20 teeth). Tooth loss and oral health data were collected from the National Health Interview Survey, compared between groups and analyzed by multivariate modeling. Group 1 subjects were older and had more partial dentures. Tooth loss was associated with self-limited food choices due to oral health status, and malnutrition. Tooth loss in Group 2 subjects was significantly associated with lower mental status. Tooth loss may predict cognitive status (OR 1.1) and physical-disability (OR 1.7). Our results suggested that tooth loss was associated with age, more partial dentures, self-limited food choices, malnutrition, and lower mental and cognitive status and physical disability.
    Archives of gerontology and geriatrics 05/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Previous research demonstrates that physical activity has psychological benefits for people of all ages. However, it is unclear whether people caring for a frail or ill relative would derive similar psychological benefits, considering the potentially stressful caregiver role. This article reviews the current literature describing the effect of physical activity interventions on the psychological status of caregivers. A search from January 1975 to December 2012 identified five intervention studies investigating physical activity and psychological status in caregivers. These focused on female Caucasian caregivers who were older than 60 years. The physical activity interventions improved stress, depression and burden in caregivers, but small sample sizes, short-term follow up and varying results limited the generalizability of the findings. There were few trials investigating male caregivers, and most care-recipients were people with dementia. Studies with caregivers of different ages and gender, with a range of physical activity interventions, are needed to clarify whether physical activity has psychological benefits for caregivers.
    Archives of gerontology and geriatrics 04/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: This study aimed to investigate age-related iron deposition changes in healthy subjects and Alzheimer disease patients using susceptibility weighted imaging. The study recruited 182 people, including 143 healthy volunteers and 39 Alzheimer disease patients. All underwent conventional magnetic resonance imaging and susceptibility weighted imaging sequences. The groups were divided according to age. Phase images were used to investigate iron deposition in the bilateral head of the caudate nucleus, globus pallidus and putamen, and the angle radian value was calculated. We hypothesized that age-related iron deposition changes may be different between Alzheimer disease patients and controls of the same age, and that susceptibility weighted imaging would be a more sensitive method of iron deposition quantification. The results revealed that iron deposition in the globus pallidus increased with age, up to 40 years. In the head of the caudate nucleus, iron deposition peaked at 60 years. There was a general increasing trend with age in the putamen, up to 50-70 years old. There was significant difference between the control and Alzheimer disease groups in the bilateral globus pallidus in both the 60-70 and 70-80 year old group comparisons. In conclusion, iron deposition increased with age in the globus pallidus, the head of the caudate nucleus and putamen, reaching a plateau at different ages. Furthermore, comparisons between the control and Alzheimer disease group revealed that iron deposition changes were more easily detected in the globus pallidus.
    Archives of gerontology and geriatrics 04/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: A valid, time-efficient and easy-to-use instrument is important for busy clinical settings, large scale surveys, or community screening use. The purpose of this study was to validate the mobility hierarchical disability categorization model (an abbreviated model) by investigating its concurrent validity with the multidimensional hierarchical disability categorization model (a comprehensive model) and triangulating both models with physical performance measures in older adults. 604 community-dwelling older adults of at least 60 years in age volunteered to participate. Self-reported function on mobility, instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) and activities of daily living (ADL) domains were recorded and then the disability status determined based on both the multidimensional hierarchical categorization model and the mobility hierarchical categorization model. The physical performance measures, consisting of grip strength and usual and fastest gait speeds (UGS, FGS), were collected on the same day. Both categorization models showed high correlation (γs = 0.92, p < 0.001) and agreement (kappa = 0.61, p < 0.0001). Physical performance measures demonstrated significant different group means among the disability subgroups based on both categorization models. The results of multiple regression analysis indicated that both models individually explain similar amount of variance on all physical performances, with adjustments for age, sex, and number of comorbidities. Our results found that the mobility hierarchical disability categorization model is a valid and time efficient tool for large survey or screening use.
    Archives of gerontology and geriatrics 03/2014; 58(2):257–262.
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to explore trajectories of recovery in patients with lower extremity joint replacements receiving post-acute rehabilitation. A retrospective cohort design was used to examine data from the Uniform Data System for Medical Rehabilitation (UDSMR(®)) for 7434 patients with total knee replacement (TKR) and 4765 patients with total hip replacement (THR) who received rehabilitation from 2008 to 2010. Functional Independence Measure (FIM)™ instrument ratings were obtained at admission, discharge, and 80-180 days after discharge. Random coefficient regression analyses using linear mixed models were used to estimate mean ratings for items within the four motor subscales (self-care, sphincter control, transfers, and locomotion) and the cognitive domain of the FIM instrument. Mean improvements at discharge for motor items ranged from 1.16 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.14, 1.19) to 2.69 (95% CI: 2.66, 2.71) points for sphincter control and locomotion, respectively. At follow-up mean motor improvements ranged from 2.17 (95% CI: 2.15, 2.20) to 4.06 (95% CI: 4.03, 4.06) points for sphincter control and locomotion, respectively. FIM cognition yielded smaller improvements: discharge=0.47 (95% CI: 0.46, 0.48); follow-up=0.83 (95% CI: 0.81, 0.84). Persons who were younger, female, non-Hispanic white, unmarried, with fewer comorbid conditions, and who received a TKR demonstrated slightly higher functional motor ratings. Overall, patients with unilateral knee or hip replacement experienced substantial improvement in motor functioning both during and up to six months following inpatient rehabilitation.
    Archives of gerontology and geriatrics 01/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to examine the course of depressive symptoms in older patients 6 months following a prolonged, acute hospitalization, especially the interrelationships among depressive symptoms and its major associated factors. For this study, we conducted a secondary analysis of data from a prospective cohort study of 351 patients aged 65 years and older. Participants were recruited from five surgical and medical wards at a tertiary medical center in northern Taiwan and assessed at three time points: within 48h of admission, before discharge, and 6 months post-discharge. The course of depressive symptoms was dynamic with symptoms increased spontaneously and substantially during hospitalization and subsided at 6 months after discharge, but still remained higher than at admission. Overall, 26.7% of older patients at hospital discharge met established criteria for minor depression (15-item Geriatric Depressive Scale (GDS-15) scores 5-9) and 21.2% for major depression (GDS-15 scores >10). As the strongest associated factors, functional dependence and nutritional status influenced depressive symptoms following hospitalization. Depressive symptoms at discharge showed significant cross-lagged effects on functional dependence and nutritional status at 6 months after discharge, suggesting a reciprocal, triadic relationship. Thus, treating one condition might improve the other. Targeting the triad of depressive symptoms, functional dependence, and nutritional status, therefore, is essential for treating depressive symptoms and improving the overall health of older adults hospitalized for acute illness.
    Archives of gerontology and geriatrics 01/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Depression in the elderly is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence and risk factors of depression among communitydwelling older population in an urban setting in Turkey.This cross-sectional study was conducted among 482 elderly individuals 65 years and over in an urban area. Cluster sampling method was used for sample size. Depression in the elderly had been diagnosed by a clinical interview and Geriatric Depression Scale. Data were collected by door-to-door survey. Chi square test was used for statistical analysis. P value, which was calculated by the results of Chi Square test and Coefficient of phi (φ), below 0.05 was included in the analysis of Logistic Regression. Depression was significantly associated with female gender, being single or divorced, lower educational status, low income, unemployement, and lack of health insurance. However, logistic regression analysis revealed higher depression rates in the elderly with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, psychiatric disease, cerebrovascular disease, low income and being dependent. Depression is common among community-dwelling older people in an urban area of Izmir, Turkey. Older adults living in community should be cautiously screened to prevent or manage depression.
    Archives of gerontology and geriatrics 01/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Inadequate vitamin D status is associated with secondary hyperparathyroidism and increased bone turnover and bone loss, which in turn increases fracture risk. The objective of this study is to assess the prevalence of inadequate vitamin D status in European women aged over 80 years. Assessments of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels [25(OH)D] were performed on 8532 European women with osteoporosis or osteopenia of which 1984 were aged over 80 years. European countries included in the study were: France, Belgium, Denmark, Italy, Poland, Hungary, United Kingdom, Spain and Germany. Two cut-offs of 25(OH)D inadequacy were fixed: < 75 nmol/L (30 ng/ml) and < 50 nmol/L (20 ng/ml). Mean (SD) age of the patients was 83.4 (2.9) years, body mass index was 25.0 (4.0) kg/m2 and level of 25(OH)D was 53.3 (26.7) nmol/L (21.4 [10.7] ng/ml). There was a highly significant difference of 25(OH)D level across European countries (p < 0.0001). In these women aged over 80 years, the prevalence of 25(OH)D inadequacy was 80.9% and 44.5% when considering cut-offs of 75 and 50 nmol/L, respectively. In the 397 (20.0%) patients taking supplemental vitamin D with or without supplemental calcium, the mean serum 25(OH)D level was significantly higher than in the other patients (65.2 (29.2) nmol/L vs. 50.3 (25.2) nmol/L; P < 0.001). This study indicates a high prevalence of vitamin D [25(OH)D] inadequacy in old European women. The prevalence could be even higher in some particular countries.
    Archives of gerontology and geriatrics 01/2014;