Archives of gerontology and geriatrics

Publisher: Elsevier

Description

  • Impact factor
    1.36
  • 5-year impact
    1.57
  • Cited half-life
    5.60
  • Immediacy index
    0.27
  • Eigenfactor
    0.00
  • Article influence
    0.40
  • ISSN
    1872-6976

Publisher details

Elsevier

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    • Articles in some journals can be made Open Access on payment of additional charge
    • NIH Authors articles will be submitted to PMC after 12 months
    • Authors who are required to deposit in subject repositories may also use Sponsorship Option
    • Pre-print can not be deposited for The Lancet
  • Classification
    ​ green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Previous research demonstrates that physical activity has psychological benefits for people of all ages. However, it is unclear whether people caring for a frail or ill relative would derive similar psychological benefits, considering the potentially stressful caregiver role. This article reviews the current literature describing the effect of physical activity interventions on the psychological status of caregivers. A search from January 1975 to December 2012 identified five intervention studies investigating physical activity and psychological status in caregivers. These focused on female Caucasian caregivers who were older than 60 years. The physical activity interventions improved stress, depression and burden in caregivers, but small sample sizes, short-term follow up and varying results limited the generalizability of the findings. There were few trials investigating male caregivers, and most care-recipients were people with dementia. Studies with caregivers of different ages and gender, with a range of physical activity interventions, are needed to clarify whether physical activity has psychological benefits for caregivers.
    Archives of gerontology and geriatrics 04/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: This study aimed to investigate age-related iron deposition changes in healthy subjects and Alzheimer disease patients using susceptibility weighted imaging. The study recruited 182 people, including 143 healthy volunteers and 39 Alzheimer disease patients. All underwent conventional magnetic resonance imaging and susceptibility weighted imaging sequences. The groups were divided according to age. Phase images were used to investigate iron deposition in the bilateral head of the caudate nucleus, globus pallidus and putamen, and the angle radian value was calculated. We hypothesized that age-related iron deposition changes may be different between Alzheimer disease patients and controls of the same age, and that susceptibility weighted imaging would be a more sensitive method of iron deposition quantification. The results revealed that iron deposition in the globus pallidus increased with age, up to 40 years. In the head of the caudate nucleus, iron deposition peaked at 60 years. There was a general increasing trend with age in the putamen, up to 50-70 years old. There was significant difference between the control and Alzheimer disease groups in the bilateral globus pallidus in both the 60-70 and 70-80 year old group comparisons. In conclusion, iron deposition increased with age in the globus pallidus, the head of the caudate nucleus and putamen, reaching a plateau at different ages. Furthermore, comparisons between the control and Alzheimer disease group revealed that iron deposition changes were more easily detected in the globus pallidus.
    Archives of gerontology and geriatrics 04/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to explore trajectories of recovery in patients with lower extremity joint replacements receiving post-acute rehabilitation. A retrospective cohort design was used to examine data from the Uniform Data System for Medical Rehabilitation (UDSMR(®)) for 7434 patients with total knee replacement (TKR) and 4765 patients with total hip replacement (THR) who received rehabilitation from 2008 to 2010. Functional Independence Measure (FIM)™ instrument ratings were obtained at admission, discharge, and 80-180 days after discharge. Random coefficient regression analyses using linear mixed models were used to estimate mean ratings for items within the four motor subscales (self-care, sphincter control, transfers, and locomotion) and the cognitive domain of the FIM instrument. Mean improvements at discharge for motor items ranged from 1.16 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.14, 1.19) to 2.69 (95% CI: 2.66, 2.71) points for sphincter control and locomotion, respectively. At follow-up mean motor improvements ranged from 2.17 (95% CI: 2.15, 2.20) to 4.06 (95% CI: 4.03, 4.06) points for sphincter control and locomotion, respectively. FIM cognition yielded smaller improvements: discharge=0.47 (95% CI: 0.46, 0.48); follow-up=0.83 (95% CI: 0.81, 0.84). Persons who were younger, female, non-Hispanic white, unmarried, with fewer comorbid conditions, and who received a TKR demonstrated slightly higher functional motor ratings. Overall, patients with unilateral knee or hip replacement experienced substantial improvement in motor functioning both during and up to six months following inpatient rehabilitation.
    Archives of gerontology and geriatrics 01/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to examine the course of depressive symptoms in older patients 6 months following a prolonged, acute hospitalization, especially the interrelationships among depressive symptoms and its major associated factors. For this study, we conducted a secondary analysis of data from a prospective cohort study of 351 patients aged 65 years and older. Participants were recruited from five surgical and medical wards at a tertiary medical center in northern Taiwan and assessed at three time points: within 48h of admission, before discharge, and 6 months post-discharge. The course of depressive symptoms was dynamic with symptoms increased spontaneously and substantially during hospitalization and subsided at 6 months after discharge, but still remained higher than at admission. Overall, 26.7% of older patients at hospital discharge met established criteria for minor depression (15-item Geriatric Depressive Scale (GDS-15) scores 5-9) and 21.2% for major depression (GDS-15 scores >10). As the strongest associated factors, functional dependence and nutritional status influenced depressive symptoms following hospitalization. Depressive symptoms at discharge showed significant cross-lagged effects on functional dependence and nutritional status at 6 months after discharge, suggesting a reciprocal, triadic relationship. Thus, treating one condition might improve the other. Targeting the triad of depressive symptoms, functional dependence, and nutritional status, therefore, is essential for treating depressive symptoms and improving the overall health of older adults hospitalized for acute illness.
    Archives of gerontology and geriatrics 01/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Increasing numbers of researchers are finding that loneliness is a significant risk factor for morbidity and mortality, and several of variables have been found to be closely related to the experience of loneliness among elders. However, much of the research has focused on the general older population, with no research to date focusing on minority populations. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence and the correlates of loneliness among a community-dwelling older Mexican American population. This study used a three-item loneliness scale to determine prevalence of loneliness. Pearson's correlation and linear regression analyses were used to determine the cross-sectional association between sociodemographic, interpersonal relationship and health variables with the scale. Data used came from the most recent wave (2011) of the Hispanic Established Populations for the Epidemiologic Studies of the Elderly (H-EPESE). A total of 873 Mexican Americans completed the loneliness scale. The age range was from 80-102, with a majority (65%) female. The mean score on the scale was 4.05 (range 3-9), indicating relatively low levels of loneliness. Regression results indicate that depressive symptoms, cognitive status, and living alone were significantly associated with higher loneliness scores. Being married and having a confidante were significantly associated with lower loneliness. Age, number of close relatives and frequency of contact were not associated with loneliness. Findings suggest that among community-dwelling Mexican American older adults, loneliness has multiple determinants. Loneliness is a significant public health topic and clinicians should be aware of the various factors that can affect loneliness.
    Archives of gerontology and geriatrics 01/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: This study aims to quantitatively summarize the risk factors for the incidence of SHF. A meta-analysis was performed with the data obtained from 22 relevant papers published in Pubmed, Embase and Cochrane central database (all through January 2014) following strict selection. The pooled odds ratios (ORs) or standardized mean difference (SMD) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated for potential risk factors associated with SHF. Our meta-analysis indicated the significant risk factors for SHF were female (OR, 1.46; 95%CI, 1.29–1.66), living in institutions (OR, 2.23; 95%CI, 1.29–3.83), osteoporosis (Singh index (SI) 1–3) (OR, 10.02; 95%CI, 5.41–18.57), low vision (OR, 2.09; 95%CI, 1.06–4.12), dementia (OR, 1.89; 95%CI, 1.47–2.43), Parkinson (OR, 2.90; 95%CI, 1.41–5.95), cardiac diseases (OR, 1.32; 95%CI, 1.02–1.70) and respiratory disease (OR, 1.97; 95%CI, 1.16–3.32). Related strategies must be implemented on those involved with above-mentioned medical conditions to effectively prevent a SHF.
    Archives of gerontology and geriatrics 01/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this survey was to estimate the burden of antimicrobial use and to describe the determinants for antimicrobial use in Hungarian long-term care facilities (LTCFs) in order to increase the attention given to the proper prescription for this vulnerable population. A one-day point-prevalence study was undertaken between April and May 2013. Data on resident treated with an antibacterial, antimycotic or tuberculostatic for systemic use were collected prospectively on a single day in each participating LTCF with over 50 beds. Descriptive statistics were used to present the data.91 LTCFs with 11,823 residents participated in this survey. 156 residents (1.3%) were given antimicrobials. 96.8% of antimicrobials were mostly prescribed for therapy included urinary tract infections (40.3%), respiratory tract infections (38.4%) and skin and soft tissue infections (13.2%). The most common therapeutic antimicrobials (97.5%) belonged to the ATC J01 class of ‘antibacterials for systemic use’. The most important J01 subclasses were J01 M quinolone antibacterials (32.7%), J01 C beta-lactam antibacterials (25.2%), J01D other beta-lactam antibacterials (11.3%) and J01F macrolides, lincosamides and streptogramins (11.3%). Antimicrobials were mostly prescribed empirically whereas 3.8% was microbiologically documented treatments. 3.2% of all prescribed antimicrobials were prescribed for the prophylaxis of urinary tract infections (60%) and ear, nose, mouth infections (40%).Our results emphasise the need of a national recommendation for good practice in LTCFs in order to avoid inappropriate antimicrobial therapy leading to spread of multidrug resistant pathogens. In addition, continuing education of prescribers on antimicrobial treatment is essential.
    Archives of gerontology and geriatrics 01/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Recruitment and retention of frail elderly in research studies can be difficult. Objective To identify challenges and strategies pertaining to recruitment and retention of frail elderly in research studies. Methods A systematic review was conducted. Four databases (MEDLINE, CINAHL, AgeLine, Embase) were searched from January 1992 to December 2012. Empirical studies were included if they explored barriers to or strategies for recruitment or retention of adults aged 60-plus who were identified as frail, vulnerable or housebound. Two researchers independently determined the eligibility of each abstract reviewed and assessed the level of evidence presented. Data concerning challenges encountered (type and impact) and strategies used (type and impact) were abstracted. Results Of 916 articles identified in the searches, 15 met the inclusion criteria. The level of evidence of the studies retained varied from poor to good. Lack of perceived benefit, distrust of research staff, poor health and mobility problems were identified as common challenges. The most frequently reported strategies used were to establish a partnership with staff that participants knew and trusted, and be flexible about the time and place of the study. However, few studies performed analyses to compare the impact of specific challenges and strategies on refusal or drop-out rates. Conclusions This review highlights the need to improve knowledge about the impact of barriers and strategies on recruitment and retention of frail older adults. This knowledge will help to develop innovative and cost-effective ways to increase and maintain participation, which may improve the generalizability of research findings to this population.
    Archives of gerontology and geriatrics 01/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Very frail elderly patients living in the community, present complex needs and have a higher rate of hospital admissions with emergency department (ED) visits. Here, we evaluated the impact on hospital admissions of the COPA model (CO-ordination Personnes Agées), which provides integrated primary care with intensive case management for community-dwelling, very frail elderly patients. We used a quasi-experimental study in an urban district of Paris with four hundred twenty-eight very frail patients (105 in the intervention group and 323 in the control group) with one-year follow-up. The primary outcome measures were the presence of any unplanned hospitalization (via the ED), any planned hospitalizations (direct admission, no ED visit) and any hospitalization overall. Secondary outcome measures included health parameters assessed with the RAI-HC (Resident Assessment Instrument-Home Care). Comparing the intervention group with the control group, the risk of having at least one unplanned hospital admission decreased at one year and the planned hospital admissions rate increased, without a significant change in total hospital admissions. Among patients in the intervention group, there was less risk of depression and dyspnea. The COPA model improves the quality of care provided to very frail elderly patients by reducing unplanned hospitalizations and improving some health parameters.
    Archives of gerontology and geriatrics 01/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Depression in the elderly is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence and risk factors of depression among communitydwelling older population in an urban setting in Turkey.This cross-sectional study was conducted among 482 elderly individuals 65 years and over in an urban area. Cluster sampling method was used for sample size. Depression in the elderly had been diagnosed by a clinical interview and Geriatric Depression Scale. Data were collected by door-to-door survey. Chi square test was used for statistical analysis. P value, which was calculated by the results of Chi Square test and Coefficient of phi (φ), below 0.05 was included in the analysis of Logistic Regression. Depression was significantly associated with female gender, being single or divorced, lower educational status, low income, unemployement, and lack of health insurance. However, logistic regression analysis revealed higher depression rates in the elderly with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, psychiatric disease, cerebrovascular disease, low income and being dependent. Depression is common among community-dwelling older people in an urban area of Izmir, Turkey. Older adults living in community should be cautiously screened to prevent or manage depression.
    Archives of gerontology and geriatrics 01/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Preventable hospital readmissions have been recognized as indicators of hospital quality, a source of increased healthcare expenditures, and a burden for patients, families, and caregivers. Despite growth of initiatives targeting risk factors associated with potentially avoidable hospital readmissions, the impact of dementia on the likelihood of rehospitalization is poorly characterized. Therefore, the primary objective of this retrospective cohort study was to investigate whether dementia was an independent predictor of 30-day readmissions. Administrative claims data for all admissions to Rhode Island hospitals in 2009 was utilized to identify hospitalizations of Medicare fee-for-service beneficiaries with a diagnosis of Alzheimer's Disease or other dementias. Demographics, measures of comorbid disease burden, and other potential confounders were extracted from the data and the odds of 30-day readmission to any United States hospital was calculated from conditional logistic regression models. From a sample of 25,839 hospitalizations, there were 3,908 index admissions of Medicare beneficiaries who fulfilled the study criteria for a dementia diagnosis. Nearly 20% of admissions (n = 5,133) were followed by a readmission within thirty days. Hospitalizations of beneficiaries with a dementia diagnosis were more likely to be followed by a readmission within thirty days, (adjusted odds ratio (AOR) 1.18; 95% CI, 1.08, 1.29), compared to hospitalizations of those of without dementia. Controlling for discharge site of care did not attenuate the association (AOR 1.21; 95% CI, 1.10, 1.33).
    Archives of gerontology and geriatrics 01/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Although trunk function is known to be critical for maintaining balance during gait, a detailed evaluation regarding the relationship between trunk function and mobility has not been performed. We previously reported that the ability of quick lateral trunk movements in a seated position reflects mobility in elderly people. In this study, we further examined whether trunk movement in the anterior-posterior direction is also a determinant of mobility. In addition, the correlation between range of lateral trunk movement and mobility was also examined. One hundred and forty community-dwelling elderly participants (73.3 ± 6.2 years) were enrolled in this study. We performed various trunk movement tests in a seated position, such as the seated side tapping test (SST), the seated anterior-posterior tapping test (APT), and the lateral sitting functional reach test (sitting reach test). Maximum gait speed and the timed up and go test (TUG) were performed to determine mobility. Parameters of trunk movement were compared. SST and APT showed moderate significant correlations with both maximum gate speed and TUG, while the sitting reach test weakly correlated (SST r = -0.58, p< 0.01, APT r = -0.63, p< 0.01, sitting reach test r = 0.30, p< 0.01). Moreover, multiple regression analysis revealed that SST and APT were independent indicators of both maximum gate speed and TUG, while the sitting reach test was not. These findings indicate that quickness, regardless of the direction of the movement, is more important than range in determining mobility in the elderly.
    Archives of gerontology and geriatrics 01/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Evidence from studies on healthy older adults and Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) populations suggests that physical activity interventions have a positive effect on executive function. In this study, we consider whether habitual physical activity is positively associated with executive function in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Eighty-two participants with a diagnosis of mild to moderate AD completed six measures of executive function. Objective measures of physical status were taken. In addition, informants completed questionnaires on the participants’ habitual physical activity and other lifestyle factors. A composite measure of executive function was the primary outcome. A multistage multiple regression was used to determine how much variance habitual physical activity accounted for. The final model comprised disease severity, cognitive reserve, cognitive activities, neuropsychiatric status and habitual physical activity status. The final model accounted for a total of 57% of the variance of executive performance, of which habitual physical activity itself accounted for 8% of the variance. Habitual physical activity status is associated executive performance in an AD population even after controlling for key covariates. The findings encourage clinicians to recommend habitual physical activity and its cognitive benefits to AD patients and their carers.
    Archives of gerontology and geriatrics 01/2014;