SAHARA J: journal of Social Aspects of HIV/AIDS Research Alliance / SAHARA , Human Sciences Research Council

Publisher: Social Aspects of HIV/AIDS Research Alliance; South African Medical Association (1998- ). Health and Medical Publishing Group

Description

  • Impact factor
    0.81
  • 5-year impact
    0.00
  • Cited half-life
    4.30
  • Immediacy index
    0.00
  • Eigenfactor
    0.00
  • Article influence
    0.00
  • Other titles
    SAHARA J (Online), Journal of Social Aspects of HIV/AIDS Research Alliance, Journal of social aspects of HIV/AIDS, Journal des aspects sociaux du VIH/SIDA, SAHARA journal, Journal SAHARA, Journal de SAHARA, SAHARA-J, Journal of the social aspects of HIV/AIDS
  • ISSN
    1813-4424
  • OCLC
    56969644
  • Material type
    Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publications in this journal

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    ABSTRACT: Abstract The purpose of this study was to investigate risk factors that could promote HIV infection amongst adolescents and young adults living in tertiary educational institutional hostels in Namibia. Employing structured questionnaires and focus group discussions, we sought to answer questions pertaining to factors, beliefs systems, values, traditions and sexual relations that could promote HIV infection in the student hostels. The data on these issues were gathered from 306 male and 314 female students aged 18-35 years living in eight hostels. Amongst other results, the data revealed that sexual promiscuity in the hostels was treated as the norm in the majority of cases, unauthorized access to hostel rooms by non-hostel dwellers was rampant, sexual harassment of female students by men who were under the influence of alcohol was reported to be common and there was general lack of support for victims of sexual abuse in the hostels. In addition, there was a general sense of insecurity in the hostels where more than 50% of the participants were afraid of being sexually attacked, some female hostel residents engaged in sexual activities for monetary and material gain and there was a general practice of older men from the community having sexual relations with young female hostel dwellers. To mitigate these and other risks it is recommended that there be provision of more HIV/AIDS prevention services, enhanced security, non-toxic entertainment (e.g. participation in sport and social clubs) and the banning of the sale of alcohol in student residences and on tertiary institution campuses. These and other results are discussed in the article and ways of mitigating the risks are proposed.
    SAHARA J: journal of Social Aspects of HIV/AIDS Research Alliance / SAHARA , Human Sciences Research Council 05/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract A contemporary reading of Romans 1:27 was disguised as a saying by Paul Benjamin, AD 58 and administered to 275 randomly selected members of a private Christian university community in south western Nigeria in West Africa. Participants were asked to respond to a two-item questionnaire on their perception of the cause of HIV/AIDS either as a judgment from God or consequence of individual lifestyle choices. The apparent consensus drifted in the direction of God as the culprit handing down his judgment to perpetrators of evil who engage in the homosexual lifestyle. The goal of this paper was to examine the implications of a judgmental stance on addressing the psychosocial needs of Persons Living with HIV/AIDS in religious environments. It also explores how service providers in faith-based environments can work around the Judgment versus Consequence tussle in providing non-discriminatory services to persons diagnosed with HIV/AIDS.
    SAHARA J: journal of Social Aspects of HIV/AIDS Research Alliance / SAHARA , Human Sciences Research Council 05/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract The advent of antiretroviral therapy (ART) has allowed couples living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) to live longer and healthier lives. The reduction in the mother-to-child transmission of HIV has encouraged some people living with HIV (PLWH) to have children. However, little is known about the parenting experiences of couples living with HIV (CLWH). The aim of this qualitative study was to explore and describe parenting experiences of seroconcordant couples who have a child while living with HIV in Malawi. Data were collected using in-depth interviews with 14 couples purposively sampled in matrilineal Chiradzulu and patrilineal Chikhwawa communities from July to December 2010. The research findings shows that irrespective of kinship organization, economic hardships, food insecurity, gender-specific role expectations and conflicting information from health institutions and media about sources of support underpin their parenting roles. In addition, male spouses are directly involved in household activities, childcare and child feeding decisions, challenging the existing stereotyped gender norms. In the absence of widow inheritance, widows from patrilineal communities are not receiving the expected support from the deceased husband relatives. Finally, the study has shown that CLWH are able to find solutions for the challenges they encounter. Contrary to existing belief that such who have children depend solely on public aid. Such claims without proper knowledge of local social cultural contexts, may contribute to stigmatizing CLWH who continue to have children. The study is also relevant to PLWH who, although not parents themselves, are confronted with a situation where they have to accept responsibility for raising children from their kin. We suggest the longer-term vision for ART wide access in Malawi to be broadened beyond provision of ART to incorporate social and economic interventions that support the rebuilding of CLWH social and economic lives. The interventions must be designed using a holistic multi-sector approach.
    SAHARA J: journal of Social Aspects of HIV/AIDS Research Alliance / SAHARA , Human Sciences Research Council 05/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract The need to effectively communicate HIV/AIDS messages in South Africa, given the high prevalence of the pandemic, cannot be overemphasised. Communication scholars have long emphasised the need to recognise adherence to cultural norms of target communities as catalyst for effective HIV/AIDS communication. Unfortunately this call has not been totally heeded by the designers of HIV/AIDS communication instruments. In the case of theatre, research has shown that in South Africa, theatre groups have gone into communities with pre-packaged plays without due cognisance of the cultural norms and beliefs of the target population. This research was conducted in KwaZulu-Natal (the province with the highest prevalence rate of HIV/AIDS infection in South Africa). Using a qualitative research methodology this paper investigated the inclusion/non-inclusion of the cultural norms of the target population in the design of the dramatic performance by the theatre group in its HIV/AIDS campaigns. The findings indicate that while the group did try to incorporate aspects of the cultural norms of the target population, it did so at a level that failed to effectively communicate the HIV/AIDS message to its audiences. This paper therefore seeks to show through empirical evidence that the non-inclusion of cultural norms and values of the target population has acted as a stumbling block in the effective communication of HIV/AIDS messages by theatre groups in the country.
    SAHARA J: journal of Social Aspects of HIV/AIDS Research Alliance / SAHARA , Human Sciences Research Council 04/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: This study was carried out in Kakola Location of Nyando District in Kenya. The aim of study was to determine the factors influencing the practice of self-care among caregivers for person living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHAs) as well as their practice of self-care. A study by World Health Organization approximated that in developing countries, the need for long-term care will increase by as much as 40% in the coming years. HIV/AIDS has been cited as one of the challenges in long-term care. As demand for long-term care increases, the assumption that extended family networks can meet all the needs of their members deteriorates. The community-based survey employed descriptive cross-sectional design, involving primary caregivers of PLWHAs in Kakola location who had practiced care giving for more than 3 months. A household survey was conducted with 150 respondents. Quantitative data were analyzed using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) program version 11.0. Simple frequencies and cross tabulations to compare variables were produced. Microsoft Excel was used to produce tables and graphs. Majority of the respondents 124 (82.7%) were female, while 26 (17.3%) were male. Self-care elements most practiced by the respondents in all the age categories were infection prevention and nutritional care. Female respondents had the highest proportions in all the practices of self-care. The results also showed that gender, relationship of patient to caregiver and marital status were the main demographic factors that significantly influenced the practice of self-care among caregivers. There was a significant relationship between main sources of income of caregivers with the practice of self-care. The study also revealed that respondents with no education had the lowest number of respondents practicing all the six practices of self-care and belonging to a support group. Recommendations for the study included, forging partnerships among stakeholders, training of caregivers and review of the home-based care policy.
    SAHARA J: journal of Social Aspects of HIV/AIDS Research Alliance / SAHARA , Human Sciences Research Council 10/2013;
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    ABSTRACT: The reach of HIV counseling and testing has grown rapidly since the 2000s, particularly since 2007 when provider-initiated counseling and testing was implemented alongside voluntary counseling and testing and testing for the prevention of mother-to-child transmission. Nevertheless, we still know little about the attendant practices of disclosing HIV-positive status. Persistently high rates of non-disclosure raise difficult ethical, public health and human rights issues. The articles in this special issue show that disclosure practices in Africa not only follow the public health rationality but are shaped by fears of stigma that favor secrecy. They show how practices of disclosure are embedded in social relationships. More specifically, they present disclosure practices at the intersection of five social spaces: international norms, national legislation and public health recommendations; household and family settings; couples' relationships; parental relationships; and relationships between health workers and PLWHA. The authors describe how people pursue strategies of disclosure in one or more of these social spaces, which sometimes allows them to avoid barriers (for instance when they choose to disclose only partially to certain 'significant others' in the household). One important finding is that counselors often do not support PLWHA to disclose their HIV status. Counselors themselves may be influenced by divergent logics and experience conflicts in values; they may also lack sufficient knowledge and skills to discuss sensitive issues based on rapidly changing medical data and public health recommendations.
    SAHARA J: journal of Social Aspects of HIV/AIDS Research Alliance / SAHARA , Human Sciences Research Council 07/2013; 10 Suppl 1:S1-4.
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    ABSTRACT: L'annonce du statut sérologique d'un enfant constitue une situation particulière qui ne peut pas obéir aux recommandations générales pour le counseling définies pour des adultes; elle est très peu normée. Alors que les programmes de Prévention de la Transmission Mère-Enfant (PTME) devraient induire environ 700 000 annonces du statut d'enfants nés de mères séropositives chaque année en Afrique, les effectifs des enfants qui ont été testés sont beaucoup plus faibles et les conditions de réalisation de cette annonce et ses aspects sociaux sur le terrain sont très peu connus. L'article a pour objectifs de décrire et d'analyser l'expérience de l'annonce du statut sérologique des nourrissons et enfants à partir d'entretiens réalisés avec des mères et des équipes de services de PTME au Burkina Faso. La méthode a reposé sur des entretiens répétés auprès de 37 mères et auprès de professionnels de santé. Leurs propos révèlent toute la complexité de l'annonce dans un contexte marqué par l'incertitude. Ils montrent d'abord les retards liés aux difficultés des prélèvements veineux et aux écueils des méthodes de diagnostic et de gestion de l'information dans les services de soins. Les acteurs de l'annonce ne se limitent pas au médecin du programme PTME, mais relèvent également d'autres fonctions professionnelles ou institutions. La mère joue un rôle clé, y compris pour solliciter l'annonce; le père n'est généralement informé que secondairement, malgré sa responsabilité légale concernant l'enfant. L'analyse des interactions révèle certaines ambiguïtés de l'annonce, à propos des informations que les médecins gardent secrètes, des attentes réciproques entre médecins et femmes en matière de communication, des interprétations que font les mères d'indices concernant la santé de leur enfant, et des situations de transmission d'informations incertaines. Le sens de l'information transmise est souvent chargé d'une dimension culpabilisante pour les mères; l'évocation du suivi ultérieur ne tempère pas cet effet. Ces observations conduisent à solliciter l'élaboration d'un modèle de conseil (counseling) spécifique, qui permette d'apporter aux mères les éléments d'information générale, d'interaction personnalisée et de soutien dont elles ont besoin pour gérer l'annonce du statut VIH de leur enfant.
    SAHARA J: journal of Social Aspects of HIV/AIDS Research Alliance / SAHARA , Human Sciences Research Council 07/2013; 10 Suppl 1:S81-92.
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    ABSTRACT: Disclosure of HIV test results is discussed during post-test counseling, following norms. However, while barriers to disclosing a positive HIV result have been documented, the literature is sparse on the way guidelines are applied in the field. The aim of this article is to describe and analyze counseling practices regarding HIV disclosure to 'significant others' (partner, family members, friends) reported by clients and providers of HIV voluntary counseling and testing in Burkina Faso. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in urban and rural areas in 2008 . A questionnaire incorporating semi-open questions was used. A total of 542 people who completed the test in 2007 and 111 service providers of HIV counseling and testing were interviewed. The data were analyzed using SPSS 12. Only 29% of those tested stated that disclosure to partner or family members was discussed with them during post-test counseling. This result is explained by providers' uncertainties and concerns regarding how to disclose, risks related to disclosure and adverse consequences of disclosure. Strategies are developed by counseling providers to support people who have been diagnosed HIV positive in disclosing to significant others, but they recognize that these actions are insufficient. Providers' suggestions are to keep fighting against the stigmatization of PLHIV, to improve counseling providers' competence in this area, and to adopt legal texts to make mandatory disclosure of the HIV result to partners. The study identified several ways to improve counseling practices regarding clients' disclosure of their HIV status in Burkina Faso. These findings could have significance for Africa as a whole.
    SAHARA J: journal of Social Aspects of HIV/AIDS Research Alliance / SAHARA , Human Sciences Research Council 07/2013; 10 Suppl 1:S73-80.
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    ABSTRACT: Disclosure of HIV status occurs for a variety of reasons and in various contexts, such as to sexual partners to enable safer sexual choices, to health-care workers to access treatment and care services and to family and community members to gain various forms of support. The reasons for disclosure or non-disclosure are shaped by the relationships, needs and circumstances of people living with HIV (PLHIV) at the time of disclosure. The purpose of this study was to investigate and describe the act and experience of disclosure in order to understand how these experiences of disclosure impact on the lives of PLHIV on antiretroviral (ARV) treatment and influence adherence to treatment. Using a qualitative research design, I conducted an ethnographic study at and through the referral clinic at the Tygerberg Hospital in Cape Town, South Africa. Ninety-three adult patients (75 women) participated in the study, 32 of whom were visited at home to conduct semi-structured in-depth interviews, and 61 of them participated in a cross-sectional study at the referral clinic using researcher-administered questionnaires. A general inductive approach was used to analyse the data. Participants in both arms of the study disclosed mainly to family members, then partners and then to friends and other persons; only five had not disclosed to anyone at all. In deciding to disclose or not, the author began to see how patients negotiated their disclosure. From weighing up other people's reactions, to being concerned about the effect of their disclosure on their disclosure targets, to concealing one's status to evade untoward negative reactions towards themselves. Further, negotiating one's disclosure is not only about to whom or how to disclose, it also means finding good opportunities to disclose or conceiving ways of hiding one's status and/or medication from others in order to enhance access and adherence to their ARV treatment. Perceived rather than actual stigma played an important role in decisions not to disclose. Nonetheless, HIV remains a highly stigmatising disease. The author suggests that both the gains in support and the evasion of negative reactions from the disclosure will continue to drive negotiation of disclosure of one's status in order for patients to access and remain adherent to their treatment. Thus, areas of disclosure and concealment as they influence one's adherence to treatment need to be investigated further to facilitate adherence to treatment.
    SAHARA J: journal of Social Aspects of HIV/AIDS Research Alliance / SAHARA , Human Sciences Research Council 07/2013; 10 Suppl 1:S17-27.
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    ABSTRACT: In Senegal, where HIV prevalence is less than 1% and stigma remains important, 40% of marriages are polygamic. The purpose of this article is to describe and analyze the motivations, benefits and constraints related to HIV disclosure, and to explore specific situations related to polygamy. Data were collected through qualitative research based on in-depth repeated interviews on the experience of antiretroviral therapy and its social effects, conducted over a period of 10 years with people on antiretroviral treatment and their caregivers. Health professionals encourage people to disclose their HIV status, especially in certain circumstances such as preventing mother-to-child transmission of HIV. Nevertheless they are aware of the social risks for some patients, particularly women. Some health workers insist on disclosure, while others do not interfere with women who do not disclose to their partner, while highlighting their ethical dilemma. Interviews trace the changing attitudes of caregivers regarding disclosure. The majority of married women begin by sharing their HIV status with their mother, waiting for her to confirm that the contamination is not due to immoral behavior and to participate in implementing a strategy to maintain secrecy. In polygamous households, women try to disclose to their partner, keeping the secret beyond the couple. Some women fear disclosure by their husbands to co-spouses, whose attitudes can be very diverse: some stories relate collective rejection from the household; sometimes disclosure is made in a progressive way following the hierarchy of positions of each person in the household; another person reported the solidarity shown by her co-spouses who kept her HIV status a secret outside the household. The article shows the diversity of situations and their dynamics regarding both disclosure practices and their social effects.
    SAHARA J: journal of Social Aspects of HIV/AIDS Research Alliance / SAHARA , Human Sciences Research Council 07/2013; 10 Suppl 1:S28-36.
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    ABSTRACT: Perception is fundamental in the fight against stigmatization of people living with HIV/AIDS (PLHIV). Perception generally influences discriminatory attitudes towards PLHIV which exacerbates their problems and quickens the degeneration of the disease from HIV to AIDS. This study examined the Anambra people's perception and knowledge of HIV/AIDS with the goal of creating knowledge on these issues in order to design effective intervention programmes towards the reduction of social stigmatization associated with the pandemic. The study was carried out in Idemmili North and Oyi local government areas of Anambra State. Qualitative and quantitative methodologies were used to elicit information from respondents who were adult males and females of 18 years and above. The research instruments were questionnaires and in-depth interview schedule. Questionnaires were administered on 1000 respondents while 13 people were interviewed in-depth. Analysis of quantitative data were conducted by using the Statistical package for Social Sciences. Univariate analysis in the form of frequencies were conducted which generated the distribution of respondents across the research variables. Furthermore, multivariate analysis were conducted to test the hypotheses and sought for relationships among variables. The qualitative data were reported in themes based on the research objectives and were analysed jointly with the quantitative data. The findings were that majority of the respondents viewed HIV/AIDS as a disease that afflict immoral people and as a punishment from God. Only a handful of them saw the disease as a disease that could afflict anybody. Also, many of the respondents said that AIDS is real but showed a low level of knowledge. It was further indicated that there were significant relationships between educational level, sex, occupation, income influence perception and peoples' reactions to HIV positive status of a relative while there were no significant relationships between these variables and knowledge of HIV/AIDS. It was concluded that these negative perceptions were as a result of the people's low level of knowledge and cultural belief systems, which see a strange illness as punishment from God for disobedience. Furthermore, the fact that most of the socio-economic characteristics of the respondents had significant relationship with perception and reaction to HIV was an indication that most people in the study area had a uniform perception. It was also an indication that government HIV/AIDS awareness programmes were not effective. It was recommended that strategies for effective HIV educational programme should be sought and carried out in the study area. Effective intervention programme have the power to change behaviours and would likely change the people's negative perception and low level of knowledge of HIV/AIDS, thereby reducing stigmatization of people living with HIV/AIDS.
    SAHARA J: journal of Social Aspects of HIV/AIDS Research Alliance / SAHARA , Human Sciences Research Council 06/2013;