Journal of Molecular Cell Biology

Publisher: Oxford University Press (OUP)

Journal description

Current impact factor: 8.43

Impact Factor Rankings

2015 Impact Factor Available summer 2015
2013 / 2014 Impact Factor 8.432
2012 Impact Factor 7.308
2011 Impact Factor 7.667
2010 Impact Factor 13.4

Impact factor over time

Impact factor
Year

Additional details

5-year impact 0.00
Cited half-life 0.00
Immediacy index 0.00
Eigenfactor 0.00
Article influence 0.00
Website Journal of Molecular Cell Biology / Fen Zi Xi Bao Sheng Wu Xue Bao website
ISSN 1759-4685

Publisher details

Oxford University Press (OUP)

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
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  • Restrictions
    • 12 months embargo
  • Conditions
    • Pre-print can only be posted prior to acceptance
    • Pre-print must be accompanied by set statement (see link)
    • Pre-print must not be replaced with post-print, instead a link to published version with amended set statement should be made
    • Pre-print on author's personal website, employer website, free public server or pre-prints in subject area
    • Post-print in Institutional repositories or Central repositories
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Set phrase to accompany archived copy (see policy)
    • Eligible authors may deposit in OpenDepot
    • The publisher will deposit in PubMed Central on behalf of NIH authors
    • Publisher last contacted on 19/02/2015
    • This policy is an exception to the default policies of 'Oxford University Press (OUP)'
  • Classification
    ​ yellow

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Intratumoral T cells play a central role in anti-tumor immunity, and the balance between T effector cells (Teff) and regulatory T cells (Treg) affects the prognosis of cancer patients. However, educated by tumor microenvironment, T cells frequently fail in their responsibility. In this study, we aimed to investigate the role of truncated isoform of protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor - type O (PTPROt) in T cell-mediated anti-tumor immunity. We recruited 70 hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients and 30 healthy volunteers for clinical investigation, and analyzed cellular tumor immunity by using ptpro(-/-) C57BL/6 mice and NOD/SCID mice. PTPROt expression was significantly downregulated in human HCC infiltrating T cells due to the hypoxia microenvironment; PTPROt expression highly correlated with the intratumoral Teff/Treg ratio and clinicopathologic characteristics. Moreover, PTPROt deficiency attenuated T cell-mediated anti-tumor immunity and remarkably promoted mouse HCC growth. Mechanistically, deletion of PTPROt decreased Teff quantity and quality through phosphorylation of lymphocyte specific tyrosine kinase (Lck), but increased Treg differentiation through phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 5. In support of the Teff/Treg homeostasis, PTPROt serves as an important tumor suppressor in HCC microenvironment. © The Author (2015). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Journal of Molecular Cell Biology, IBCB, SIBS, CAS. All rights reserved.
    Journal of Molecular Cell Biology 06/2015; DOI:10.1093/jmcb/mjv047
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    ABSTRACT: The evolutionarily conserved Hippo signaling pathway plays an important role in organ size control by regulating cell proliferation and apoptosis. Here, we identify Lingerer (Lig) as a growth suppressor using RNAi modifying screen in Drosophila melanogaster. Loss of lig increases organ size and promotes bantam (ban) and the expression of the Hippo pathway target genes, while overexpression of lig results in diminished ban expression and organ size reduction. We demonstrate that Lig C-terminal exhibits dominant-negative function on growth and ban expression, and thus plays an important role in organ size control and ban regulation. In addition, we provide evidence that both Yki and Mad are essential for Lig-induced ban expression. We also show that Lig regulates the expression of the Hippo pathway target genes partially via Yorkie. Moreover, we find that Lig physically interacts with and requires Salvador to restrict cell growth. Taken together, we demonstrate that Lig functions as a critical growth suppressor to control organ size via ban and Hippo signaling. © The Author (2015). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Journal of Molecular Cell Biology, IBCB, SIBS, CAS. All rights reserved.
    Journal of Molecular Cell Biology 06/2015; DOI:10.1093/jmcb/mjv045
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    ABSTRACT: Tight regulation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling is essential to maintain homeostasis in immune system in response to various stimuli, which has been studied extensively and deeply. However, the molecular mechanisms responsible for its negative regulation are not completely understood. Here we demonstrate that human coilin-interacting nuclear ATPase protein (hCINAP) is a novel negative regulator in NF-κB signaling by deactivating IκB kinase (IKK) complex. In response to TNF stimulation, hCINAP dynamically associates with IKKα and IKKβ and inhibits IKK phosphorylation. Notably, hCINAP directly interacts with the catalytic subunits of protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) and mediates the formation of IKK-hCINAP-PP1 complex, serving as an adaptor protein that recruits PP1 to dephosphorylate IKK. Furthermore, decreased levels of hCINAP are observed in several inflammatory diseases with NF-κB hyperactivity. Our study suggests a novel mechanism underlying deactivation of IKK and provides new insight into the negative regulation of NF-κB signaling. © The Author (2015). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Journal of Molecular Cell Biology, IBCB, SIBS, CAS. All rights reserved.
    Journal of Molecular Cell Biology 06/2015; DOI:10.1093/jmcb/mjv041
  • Journal of Molecular Cell Biology 06/2015; DOI:10.1093/jmcb/mjv038
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    ABSTRACT: Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) plays a critical role in promoting cancer metastasis. In this study, cancer EMT is considered as an overall structural change in the gene regulatory network (GRN), and its essential features are elucidated by the network biology approach. We first defined the state space of GRN as a set of all possible activation patterns of GRN, and then introduced the quasi-potential field into this space to show the relative stability distribution of each state. The quasi-potential was determined empirically by collecting gene expression profiles from public databases. Changes of GRN states during the EMT process were traced in the state space, by using time-course data of gene expression profiles of a cell line inducing EMT from the database. It was found that cancer EMT occurred in three sequential stable stages, each of which formed a potential basin along the EMT trajectory. As confirmation, structural changes of GRN were estimated by applying the ARACNe algorithm to the same time-course data, and then applying master regulator analysis to extract the main regulations. Each group of master regulators was found to be alternatively active in the subsequent three stages to cause overall structural changes of GRN during cancer EMT. © The Author (2015). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Journal of Molecular Cell Biology, IBCB, SIBS, CAS. All rights reserved.
    Journal of Molecular Cell Biology 06/2015; DOI:10.1093/jmcb/mjv035
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: How metastases develop is not well understood and no genetic mutations have been reported as specific metastatic drivers. Here we have addressed the idea that epigenetic reprogramming by GLI-regulated pluripotent stemness factors promotes metastases. Using primary human colon cancer cells engrafted in mice, we find that transient expression of OCT4, SOX2, KLF4 +/- cMYC establishes an enhanced, pro-metastatic state in the primary tumor that is stable through sequential engraftments and is transmitted through clonogenic cancer stem cells. Metastatic reprogramming alters NANOG methylation and stably boosts NANOG and NANOGP8 expression. Metastases and reprogrammed EMT-like phenotypes require endogenous NANOG, but enhanced NANOG is not sufficient to induce these phenotypes. Finally, reprogrammed tumors enhance GLI2, and we show that GLI2(high) and AXIN2(low), which are markers of the metastatic transition of colon cancers, are prognostic of poor disease outcome in patients. We propose that metastases arise through epigenetic reprogramming of cancer cells within primary tumors. © The Author (2015). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Journal of Molecular Cell Biology, IBCB, SIBS, CAS.
    Journal of Molecular Cell Biology 06/2015; DOI:10.1093/jmcb/mjv034
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    ABSTRACT: O-glycosylation of the nuclear pore complex (NPC) by O-linked N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) is conserved within metazoans. Many nucleoporins (Nups) comprising the NPC are constitutively O-GlcNAcylated, but the functional role of this modification remains enigmatic. We show that loss of O-GlcNAc, induced by either inhibition of O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT) or deletion of the gene encoding OGT, leads to decreased cellular levels of a number of natively O-GlcNAcylated Nups. Loss of O-GlcNAc enables increased ubiquitination of these Nups and their increased proteasomal degradation. The decreased half-life of these deglycosylated Nups manifests in their gradual loss from the NPC and a downstream malfunction of the nuclear pore selective permeability barrier in both dividing and post-mitotic cells. These findings define a critical role of O-GlcNAc modification of the NPC in maintaining its composition and the function of the selectivity filter. The results implicate NPC glycosylation as a regulator of NPC function and reveal the role of conserved glycosylation of the NPC among metazoans. © The Author (2015). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Journal of Molecular Cell Biology, IBCB, SIBS, CAS. All rights reserved.
    Journal of Molecular Cell Biology 06/2015; DOI:10.1093/jmcb/mjv033
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    ABSTRACT: The DNA repair enzyme AlkB was identified in E. coli more than three decades ago. Since then, nine mammalian homologs, all members of the superfamily of alpha-ketoglutarate and Fe(II)-dependent dioxygenases, have been identified (designated ALKBH1-8 and FTO). While E. coli AlkB serves as a DNA repair enzyme, only two mammalian homologs have been confirmed to repair DNA in vivo. The other mammalian homologs have remarkably diverse substrate specificities and biological functions. Substrates recognized by the different AlkB homologs comprise erroneous methyl- and etheno adducts in DNA, unique wobble uridine modifications in certain tRNAs, methylated adenines in mRNA, and methylated lysines on proteins. The phenotypes of organisms lacking or overexpressing individual AlkB homologs include obesity, severe sensitivity to inflammation, infertility, growth retardation, and multiple malformations. Here we review the present knowledge of the mammalian AlkB homologs and their implications for human disease and development. © The Author (2015). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Journal of Molecular Cell Biology, IBCB, SIBS, CAS. All rights reserved.
    Journal of Molecular Cell Biology 05/2015; DOI:10.1093/jmcb/mjv029
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    ABSTRACT: Tumors are the result of accumulated genomic alterations that cooperate synergistically to produce uncontrollable cell growth. Although identifying recurrent alterations among large collections of tumors provides a way to pinpoint genes that endow a selective advantage in oncogenesis and progression, it fails to address the genetic interactions behind this selection process. A non-random pattern of co-mutated genes is evidence for selective forces acting on tumor cells that harbor combinations of these genetic alterations. Although existing methods have successfully identified mutually exclusive gene sets, no current method can systematically discover more general genetic relationships. We develop Genomic Alteration Modules using Total Correlation (GAMToC), an information theoretic framework that integrates copy number and mutation data to identify gene modules with any non-random pattern of joint alteration. Additionally, we present the Seed-GAMToC procedure, which uncovers the mutational context of any putative cancer gene. The software is publicly available. Applied to glioblastoma multiforme samples, GAMToC results show distinct subsets of co-occurring mutations, suggesting distinct mutational routes to cancer and providing new insight into mutations associated with proneural, proneural/G-CIMP, and classical types of the disease. The results recapitulate known relationships such as mutual exclusive mutations, place these alterations in the context of other mutations, and find more complex relationships such as conditional mutual exclusivity. © The Author (2015). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Journal of Molecular Cell Biology, IBCB, SIBS, CAS. All rights reserved.
    Journal of Molecular Cell Biology 05/2015; DOI:10.1093/jmcb/mjv026
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    ABSTRACT: Network or edge biomarkers are a reliable form to characterize phenotypes or diseases. However, obtaining edges or correlations between molecules for an individual requires measurement of multiple samples of that individual, which are generally unavailable in clinical practice. Thus, it is strongly demanded to diagnose a disease by edge or network biomarkers in one-sample-for-one-individual context. Here, we developed a new computational framework, EdgeBiomarker, to integrate edge and node biomarkers to diagnose phenotype of each single test sample. By applying the method to datasets of lung and breast cancer, it reveals new marker genes/gene-pairs and related sub-networks for distinguishing earlier and advanced cancer stages. Our method shows advantages over traditional methods: (i) edge biomarkers extracted from non-differentially expressed genes achieve better cross-validation accuracy of diagnosis than molecule or node biomarkers from differentially expressed genes, suggesting that certain pathogenic information is only present at the level of network and under-estimated by traditional methods; (ii) edge biomarkers categorize patients into low/high survival rate in a more reliable manner; (iii) edge biomarkers are significantly enriched in relevant biological functions or pathways, implying that the association changes in a network, rather than expression changes in individual molecules, tend to be causally related to cancer development. The new framework of edge biomarkers paves the way for diagnosing diseases and analyzing their molecular mechanisms by edges or networks in one-sample-for-one-individual basis. This also provides a powerful tool for precision medicine or big-data medicine. © The Author (2015). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Journal of Molecular Cell Biology, IBCB, SIBS, CAS. All rights reserved.
    Journal of Molecular Cell Biology 04/2015; DOI:10.1093/jmcb/mjv025
  • Journal of Molecular Cell Biology 04/2015; 7(2):91. DOI:10.1093/jmcb/mjv024