Gut Pathogens

Publisher: International Society for Genomic and Evolutionary Microbiology

Description

  • Impact factor
    2.74
  • 5-year impact
    2.85
  • Cited half-life
    2.70
  • Immediacy index
    0.13
  • Eigenfactor
    0.00
  • Article influence
    0.80
  • ISSN
    1757-4749
  • OCLC
    318907797
  • Material type
    Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Clostridium difficile is the leading cause of infectious diarrhea in humans and responsible for large outbreaks of enteritis in neonatal pigs in both North America and Europe. Disease caused by C. difficile typically occurs during antibiotic therapy and its emergence over the past 40 years is linked with the widespread use of broad-spectrum antibiotics in both human and veterinary medicine. We sequenced the genome of Clostridium difficile 5.3 using the Illumina Nextera XT and MiSeq technologies. Assembly of the sequence data reconstructed a 4,009,318 bp genome in 27 scaffolds with an N50 of 786 kbp. The genome has extensive similarity to other sequenced C. difficile genomes, but also has several genes that are potentially related to virulence and pathogenicity that are not present in the reference C. difficile strain. Genome sequencing of human and animal isolates is needed to understand the molecular events driving the emergence of C. difficile as a gastrointestinal pathogen of humans and food animals and to better define its zoonotic potential.
    Gut Pathogens 02/2014; 6(1):4.
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Vibrio cholerae is a human intestinal pathogen and V. cholerae of the O139 serogroups are responsible for the current epidemic cholera in China. In this work, we reported the whole genome sequencing of a V. cholerae O139 strain E306 isolated from a cholera patient in the 306th Hospital of PLA, Beijing, China. We obtained the draft genome of V. cholerae O139 strain E306 with a length of 4,161,908 bps and mean G + C content of 47.7%. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that strain E306 was very close to another O139 strain, V. cholerae MO10, which was isolated during the cholera outbreak in India and Bangladesh. However, unlike MO10, strain E306 harbors the El Tor-specific RS1 element with no pre-CTX prophage (VSK), very similar to those found in some V. cholerae O1 strains. In addition, strain E306 contains a SXT/R391 family integrative conjugative element (ICE) similar to ICEVchInd4 and SXT MO10, and it carries more antibiotic resistance genes than other closest neighbors. The genome sequence of the V. cholerae O139 strain E306 and its comparative analysis with other V. cholerae strains we present here will provide important information for a better understanding of the pathogenicity of V. cholerae and their molecular mechanisms to adapt different environments.
    Gut Pathogens 02/2014; 6(1):3.
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Probiotics are commonly used as feed additive to substitute antibiotic as growth promoter in animal farming. Probiotic consists of lactic acid bacteria (LAB), which enhance the growth and health of the animal. Probiotic also have higher possibility to become pathogenic bacteria that may carry antibiotic resistant gene that can be transmitted to other LAB species. The aim of this study was to identify the LAB species in the faeces of broiler chicken and to determine the prevalence of antibiotic resistant in LAB of broiler chicken. Sixty faeces samples were collected from wet markets located in Klang Valley of Malaysia for the isolation of LAB using de-Mann Rogosa Sharpe medium. Thirteen species of LAB were obtained in this study and the identification of LAB was performed by using API test kit on the basis of carbohydrate fermentation profile. Antibiotic susceptibility assay was then carried out to determine the prevalence of LAB antibiotic resistance. Lactococcus lactis subsp lactis was found in nine out of sixty faecal samples. Lactobacillus paracasei was the second common LAB species isolated from chicken faecal. No significant difference (P > 0.05) was found between the occurrence of Lactobacillus brevis, Lactobacillus curvatus, L. plantarum, Leuconostoc lactis mesenteroides subsp mesenteroides / dectranium and Pediococcus pentosaceus isolated from 5 different locations. Most of the isolated LAB was resistant to antibiotic and high variability of the antibiotic resistance was observed among the LAB against 15 types of antibiotics. Penicillin, amoxicillin, chloramphenicol, and ampicillin had significant higher (P< 0.05) inhibitory zone than nalidixic acid, gentamycin, sulphamethoxazole, kanamycin, and streptomycin. Many species of LAB were isolated from the faecal samples of broiler chicken that resistance to the common antibiotics used in the farm. The development of resistant against antibiotics in LAB can be attributed to the long term exposure of antibiotic as growth promoter and therapeutic agents. Thus, it is essential to advise farmer the safety measure of antibiotic application in animal farming. Additionally, the supplementation of probiotic in animal feeding also needs more attention and close monitoring.
    Gut Pathogens 01/2014; 6(1):1.
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Sulawesi in Indonesia has a unique geographical profile with assumed separation from Sundaland. Studies of Helicobacter pylori in this region are rare due to the region's rural location and lack of endoscopy equipment. Indirect methods are, therefore, the most appropriate for measuring H. pylori infection in these areas; with the disposable gastric brush test, we can obtain gastric juice as well as small gastric tissue samples for H. pylori culture. We investigated the prevalence of H. pylori infection and evaluated human migration patterns in the remote areas of North Sulawesi.
    Gut Pathogens 01/2014; 6(1):42.
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Poultry represent an important source of foodborne enteropathogens, in particular thermophilic Campylobacter species. Many of these organisms colonize the intestinal tract of broiler chickens as harmless commensals, and therefore, often remain undetected prior to slaughter. The exact reasons for the lack of clinical disease are unknown, but analysis of the gastrointestinal microbiota of broiler chickens may improve our understanding of the microbial interactions with the host.
    Gut Pathogens 01/2014; 6:18.