International Journal of Culture and Mental Health Impact Factor & Information

Publisher: Taylor & Francis (Routledge)

Journal description

Current impact factor: 0.00

Impact Factor Rankings

Additional details

5-year impact 0.00
Cited half-life 0.00
Immediacy index 0.00
Eigenfactor 0.00
Article influence 0.00
Other titles International journal of culture and mental health
ISSN 1754-2863
OCLC 154690457
Material type Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Journal / Magazine / Newspaper, Internet Resource

Publisher details

Taylor & Francis (Routledge)

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Some individual journals may have policies prohibiting pre-print archiving
    • On author's personal website or departmental website immediately
    • On institutional repository or subject-based repository after either 12 months embargo
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • On a non-profit server
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Set statements to accompany deposits (see policy)
    • The publisher will deposit in on behalf of authors to a designated institutional repository including PubMed Central, where a deposit agreement exists with the repository
    • STM: Science, Technology and Medicine
    • Publisher last contacted on 25/03/2014
    • This policy is an exception to the default policies of 'Taylor & Francis (Routledge)'
  • Classification
    ​ green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The wide reach and devastation of recent natural disasters and other traumatic events provides an opportunity to revisit the conceptualization of trauma and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Currently, the majority of PTSD research focuses on the aftermath of isolated, single events for individuals, or time-limited trauma episodes (e.g., child abuse). This paper explores classification of traumatic experiences that questions the notion of the ‘post-’ in PTSD. Moreover, the authors focus on placing trauma in a cultural and social context, including an historical perspective and current responses to trauma across the world. Discussion and recommendations concern the role of mental health providers in the face of disasters and other traumatic events across the globe, with a specific consciousness of contexts in which a ‘post-’ is not applicable.
    International Journal of Culture and Mental Health 01/2015; 8(1). DOI:10.1080/17542863.2014.892519
  • International Journal of Culture and Mental Health 10/2014; 7(4). DOI:10.1080/17542863.2013.815241
  • International Journal of Culture and Mental Health 10/2014; 7(4). DOI:10.1080/17542863.2012.757334
  • International Journal of Culture and Mental Health 10/2014; 7(4). DOI:10.1080/17542863.2013.797140
  • International Journal of Culture and Mental Health 10/2014; 7(4). DOI:10.1080/17542863.2013.787192
  • International Journal of Culture and Mental Health 09/2014; DOI:10.1080/17542863.2014.937347
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Drawing on the historical experiences of a bicultural society in Goa, a former Portuguese state on the western coast of India, this article describes how the exchange between two groups with conflicting and contrasting cultures, Hindus and Christians, continued to persist and grow for more than four centuries. The Goan acculturation took place in three stages. A relatively peaceful co-existence of the two groups, lasting about 30 years, was followed by almost 200 years of both Christianization and ‘westernization’ as well attempts to eliminate the interaction between Hindus and Christians. These attempts were unsuccessful and eventually the discriminatory practices were outlawed. A skillful collective use of adaptive strategies led to the prevention and minimization of demoralization and the creation of a vibrant hybrid culture, the Indo-Portuguese culture of Goa.
    International Journal of Culture and Mental Health 09/2014; 8(1):1-15. DOI:10.1080/17542863.2014.892523
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Historically, Vietnamese American immigrants have experienced distress associated with war, involuntary migration, and adjustment to life in the USA. Social determinants, including perceived neighborhood safety and economic indicators, have established relationships with psychological distress. The present study applied the life course perspective to investigate how social determinants differentiate the psychological distress of older Vietnamese immigrants. Vietnamese immigrant respondents to the California Health Interview Survey over the age of 50 were studied. A total of 436 Vietnamese adults were included in this study. A single-item measure of perceived neighborhood safety was employed as well as the six-item Kessler Psychological Distress Scale. The results showed differences in the likelihood of reporting higher levels of psychological distress based on perceived neighborhood safety. Additionally, age moderated the effects of perceived neighborhood safety and income on psychological distress. Future research on the role of perceived neighborhood safety on mental health among displaced groups can shed light on community-level correlates of health and mental health.
    International Journal of Culture and Mental Health 09/2014; 8(1):1-12. DOI:10.1080/17542863.2014.892518
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This article describes how the exchange of ideas and values between members of two different and conflicting cultures may persist despite systematic opposition under certain circumstances. Examples are drawn from the historical experience of Hindus and Christians in Goa, a former Portuguese state on the western coast of India, spanning over four centuries (from 1510 till 1961). Three types of mechanisms are described in terms of three aspects of the sociocultural system: structure (e.g., biological dispositions, availability of an exit, and preservation of the social framework), process (e.g., sharing of business interests and symbolic systems), and outcome (e.g., management of stigma and creation of a bicultural ambient world). The result was the creation of a hybrid vibrant culture, the Indo-Portuguese culture of Goa, and the minimization or prevention of demoralization.
    International Journal of Culture and Mental Health 09/2014; 8(1):1-16. DOI:10.1080/17542863.2014.892524
  • International Journal of Culture and Mental Health 09/2014; DOI:10.1080/17542863.2014.913643
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The objective of this article is to describe a framework for the understanding of how the exchange of ideas and values between members of two different and conflicting cultures may lead to the prevention of demoralization and formation of a hybrid culture, and how this exchange may persist despite systematic opposition. Available evidence suggests that sociocultural resilience and individual resilience are pre-requisites of each other. Individual resilience appears to be the polar opposite of subjective incompetence, the clinical hallmark of demoralization. The testing of these hypotheses requires a longitudinal study of acculturation over a period of decades or centuries. This could be accomplished by interpreting social and cultural phenomena identified by historical research in terms of current evidence-based and integrated knowledge in psychiatry, psychology, epidemiology, sociology, and anthropology.
    International Journal of Culture and Mental Health 09/2014; 8(1):1-7. DOI:10.1080/17542863.2014.892522
  • International Journal of Culture and Mental Health 09/2014; DOI:10.1080/17542863.2014.907327
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This longitudinal study explores the adjustment experience of Korean immigrants in Canada by examining changes in their well-being during the first four years of settlement. Data were derived from the three-wave Longitudinal Survey of Immigrants to Canada, conducted between April 2001 and November 2005. We use a subsample of 1811 immigrants aged 15 years or older from South Korea (n = 351), Eastern European countries (n = 1152), and Western European countries (n = 308). Results indicated that changes in life satisfaction among Korean immigrants were significantly different from those found among Europeans. In Western and Eastern Europeans, the rates of life satisfaction declined gradually during the initial four years of settlement, whereas for Koreans the decline was drastic. Employment status among Korean women and income and ethnic network among Korean men were salient factors for declining life satisfaction.
    International Journal of Culture and Mental Health 09/2014; 8(1):1-12. DOI:10.1080/17542863.2014.892521
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This article examines how bicultural harmonization was achieved in a society exposed to acculturative stress for almost two centuries and discusses the implications of the historical experience of this bicultural society to clinical practice, cultural psychotherapy, and program development for bicultural populations. The setting being studied is Goa, a former Portuguese state on the western coast of India. Two cultural sub-groups, Hindus and Christians, continued to interact despite attempts to eliminate their bicultural exchange. The result was the formation of a vibrant hybrid culture, the Indo-Portuguese culture of Goa, and the minimization or prevention of demoralization. The findings highlight the importance of encouraging bicultural individuals to borrow values and norms from both cultures, switch between them in response to cultural cues, adapt themselves to both, synthesize norms of both, and apply those norms judiciously to particular situations. Programs designed to relieve distress and demoralization in bicultural individuals should aim at the promotion of harmonization rather than total assimilation.
    International Journal of Culture and Mental Health 09/2014; 8(1):1-13. DOI:10.1080/17542863.2014.892525
  • International Journal of Culture and Mental Health 09/2014; DOI:10.1080/17542863.2014.931979
  • International Journal of Culture and Mental Health 04/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The present study examined mental health literacy of negative body image in a sample of 485 British adults. Participants were presented with vignettes of a fictional woman (‘Kate’) and man (‘Jack’) suffering from negative body image and were asked questions addressing symptom recognition, distress, sympathy and sources of help-seeking. Participants also completed measures of body appreciation and psychiatric skepticism. Results showed that less than a fifth of participants correctly identified the vignettes as depicting cases of negative body image. The vignette describing Kate was rated as significantly more distressing, deserving of sympathy and requiring help than that of Jack. Women rated the conditions described by both vignettes as significantly more distressing and requiring help than did men. Psychiatric skepticism and body appreciation were significantly associated with beliefs about the vignettes. Implications of the results for the promotion of mental health literacy in relation to body image are discussed.
    International Journal of Culture and Mental Health 04/2014; 7(2). DOI:10.1080/17542863.2013.769611
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The utilization of mental health services by Arab Americans is an evolving area of research. There are an estimated 3.5 million Americans of Arab descent currently residing in the USA. A total of 48 Arab American psychotherapy clients were studied and the method used was documentation of referral source, presenting problem, number of sessions, satisfaction with psychotherapy and stated reasons for discontinuing. The Client Satisfaction Questionnaire was distributed to collect data on satisfaction with therapy. Indicators were compared with those of 48 non-Arab clients, with the objective of exploring differences in utilization of psycho-therapy between the groups. Referral source was more likely to be an outside source for the Arab American group, contrasted with self-referral for non-Arab-Americans. Reported levels of satisfaction with psychotherapy was 28.3 for the Arab American group (versus a mean of 23.8 for the other group) and they attended more sessions. Arab-Americans attended a mean of 21 sessions, compared to a mean of 14 for the other group. The two groups had similar results in the areas of presenting problem and reason for discontinuing therapy. Results can be applied in the areas of community education and outreach regarding mental health services and training psychotherapists working with this population.
    International Journal of Culture and Mental Health 04/2014; 7(2). DOI:10.1080/17542863.2012.742121
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The belief of the effect of the full moon on mental illness is well established in western societies. Studies made in the past have shown conflicting results. Both psychological and biological theories have been proposed in trying to explain the myth. In our study, we examined the lunar cycle effect on patients with mental illness attending the emergency room (ER) in a psychiatric hospital in Kuwait. We included Muslim patients only. As the notion of the effect of lunar cycle on mental illness is not held in Islam, our study acted as a blind control study examining if there is a real biological basis for the myth. Patients' visits were classified according to age, gender, day of visit, lunar phase and diagnosis or presenting complaint. There were no statistical differences in the number of ER visits by all patients during the different moon phases. There were differences in the number of ER visits between the different diagnoses and presenting complaints, with depression most common and catatonia the least common. We conclude, therefore, that the lunar cycle has no influence on ER visits by patients with mental illness and if there is such an effect, then it is mostly psychological rather than biological.
    International Journal of Culture and Mental Health 04/2014; 7(2). DOI:10.1080/17542863.2013.771690