International Journal of Culture and Mental Health

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

Description

  • Impact factor
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  • 5-year impact
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  • Cited half-life
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  • Other titles
    International journal of culture and mental health
  • ISSN
    1754-2863
  • OCLC
    154690457
  • Material type
    Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Journal / Magazine / Newspaper, Internet Resource

Publisher details

Taylor & Francis

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Some individual journals may have policies prohibiting pre-print archiving
    • On author's personal website or departmental website immediately
    • On institutional repository or subject-based repository after either 12 months embargo for STM, Behavioural Science and Public Health Journals or 18 months embargo for SSH journals
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • On a non-profit server
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Set statements to accompany deposits (see policy)
    • The publisher will deposit in on behalf of authors to a designated institutional repository including PubMed Central, where a deposit agreement exists with the repository
    • STM: Science, Technology and Medicine
    • SSH: Social Science and Humanities
    • Publisher last contacted on 25/03/2014
    • 'Taylor & Francis (Psychology Press)' is an imprint of 'Taylor & Francis'
  • Classification
    ​ green

Publications in this journal

  • International Journal of Culture and Mental Health 04/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: The present study examined mental health literacy of negative body image in a sample of 485 British adults. Participants were presented with vignettes of a fictional woman (‘Kate’) and man (‘Jack’) suffering from negative body image and were asked questions addressing symptom recognition, distress, sympathy and sources of help-seeking. Participants also completed measures of body appreciation and psychiatric skepticism. Results showed that less than a fifth of participants correctly identified the vignettes as depicting cases of negative body image. The vignette describing Kate was rated as significantly more distressing, deserving of sympathy and requiring help than that of Jack. Women rated the conditions described by both vignettes as significantly more distressing and requiring help than did men. Psychiatric skepticism and body appreciation were significantly associated with beliefs about the vignettes. Implications of the results for the promotion of mental health literacy in relation to body image are discussed.
    International Journal of Culture and Mental Health 04/2014; 7(2).
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    ABSTRACT: The utilization of mental health services by Arab Americans is an evolving area of research. There are an estimated 3.5 million Americans of Arab descent currently residing in the USA. A total of 48 Arab American psychotherapy clients were studied and the method used was documentation of referral source, presenting problem, number of sessions, satisfaction with psychotherapy and stated reasons for discontinuing. The Client Satisfaction Questionnaire was distributed to collect data on satisfaction with therapy. Indicators were compared with those of 48 non-Arab clients, with the objective of exploring differences in utilization of psycho-therapy between the groups. Referral source was more likely to be an outside source for the Arab American group, contrasted with self-referral for non-Arab-Americans. Reported levels of satisfaction with psychotherapy was 28.3 for the Arab American group (versus a mean of 23.8 for the other group) and they attended more sessions. Arab-Americans attended a mean of 21 sessions, compared to a mean of 14 for the other group. The two groups had similar results in the areas of presenting problem and reason for discontinuing therapy. Results can be applied in the areas of community education and outreach regarding mental health services and training psychotherapists working with this population.
    International Journal of Culture and Mental Health 04/2014; 7(2).
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    ABSTRACT: The belief of the effect of the full moon on mental illness is well established in western societies. Studies made in the past have shown conflicting results. Both psychological and biological theories have been proposed in trying to explain the myth. In our study, we examined the lunar cycle effect on patients with mental illness attending the emergency room (ER) in a psychiatric hospital in Kuwait. We included Muslim patients only. As the notion of the effect of lunar cycle on mental illness is not held in Islam, our study acted as a blind control study examining if there is a real biological basis for the myth. Patients' visits were classified according to age, gender, day of visit, lunar phase and diagnosis or presenting complaint. There were no statistical differences in the number of ER visits by all patients during the different moon phases. There were differences in the number of ER visits between the different diagnoses and presenting complaints, with depression most common and catatonia the least common. We conclude, therefore, that the lunar cycle has no influence on ER visits by patients with mental illness and if there is such an effect, then it is mostly psychological rather than biological.
    International Journal of Culture and Mental Health 04/2014; 7(2).
  • International Journal of Culture and Mental Health 03/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Book Review
    International Journal of Culture and Mental Health 03/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: In community youth mental health care (YMHC), patients are mostly diagnosed according to the clinical judgment of professionals. Because validated instruments are hardly used, this process may be influenced by other factors than the diagnostic criteria, such as the ethnic background of the patient. The goal of our study was to assess differences between ethnic groups in the received clinical diagnoses. The sample consisted of children (n=1940) and adolescents (n=2484) admitted to a Dutch YMHC center. Ethnic background was specified based on the country of birth of the parents. Odds ratios on clinical diagnoses for non-native patients were calculated with the native patients as reference. The results showed that native patients more often received specific psychiatric disorders and co-morbid diagnoses on Axis I, while ethnic minority children more often received V-codes only, indicating that there was insufficient information to determine a psychiatric disorder. We therefore assume that it is harder to recognise psychiatric disorders when non-native patients are diagnosed. This could imply that immigrant children and adolescents are not adequately treated for their disorders in YMHC. We recommend that YMHC professionals should reflect on the potential biasing effect of the patient's ethnic background in diagnostic procedures.
    International Journal of Culture and Mental Health 01/2014; 7(3).
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    ABSTRACT: Acculturation is perhaps the most difficult problem many international medical graduates (IMGs) face during their training in the USA. Yet little is known about how residents and fellows progress through this aspect in the adaptation process. This study is an attempt to understand the acculturation process in the USA for IMGs by using a demographic survey and the General Ethnicity Questionnaire. In our study, IMGs reported fewer struggles with general adaptation, perhaps due to pre-residency experience living in the USA. International medical graduates generally embrace a life blended from the best of their country of origin and appreciated qualities found in the USA. Training programs focusing on the celebration of diversity in communities may further enhance adaptation and acculturation to life in the USA.
    International Journal of Culture and Mental Health 01/2014; 7(2).
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to examine the experience of individuals diagnosed with schizophrenia in the low-income country of Nigeria. A phenomenological approach was adopted to explore the relationship of poverty and poor adherence to antipsychotics. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 11 individuals diagnosed with schizophrenia. The interviews were audiotaped, transcribed verbatim and analysed. A reiterative process allowed the development of two major categories. It was found that the experience of taking medication was associated with both wellness and side-effects, which could affect the ability to function. Poverty was associated with poor adherence to antipsychotics. The results show that poverty and poor adherence to antipsychotics significantly overlap and result in lack of money to purchase antipsychotics, food insecurity, feelings of vulnerability and social exclusion. Respondents' in this study experienced significant poverty, which impacted negatively on health and wellbeing, and this needs to be urgently addressed. The development of social policy to include the waiving of prescription charges for individuals within this group would not only ensure that healthcare services are available, but would also actively contribute to improving their healthcare outcomes.
    International Journal of Culture and Mental Health 01/2014; 7(3).
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    ABSTRACT: With the realization of eating disorders outside of westernized societies, it is clear that body image and western cultural ideals are not the only etiologies for anorexia nervosa across cultures. Using a retrospective chart review of a single medical record, a case study is presented to illustrate that eating disorders are context-bound with multiple factors playing a role in the pervasive existence of anorexia nervosa among various societies and cultures. As the existence of eating disorders across diverse cultures continues to be identified and recognized, it is necessary to consider family, developmental, social and cultural factors in order to accurately formulate and effectively treat anorexia nervosa.
    International Journal of Culture and Mental Health 01/2014; 7(3).
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    ABSTRACT: There is great concern over stigmatisation amongst young people towards people with mental health problems. However, few studies have conducted international comparisons between young people living in Asian countries. This study investigated the knowledge and attitudes towards people with mental health problems in secondary school students in Osaka (Japan), Shenyang (China) and Busan (South-Korea) to determine which factors influence their understandings and attitudes towards people with mental health problems. The study included 380 participants from Osaka, 294 from Shenyang and 350 from Busan. A cross-sectional survey was conducted to assess knowledge and social distance towards people with mental health problems, as understandings and attitudes. Stigmatising knowledge and attitudes were held by students in Osaka, Shengyang and Busan. The students in Busan were more likely to give positive responses than those in Osaka and Shenyang. There was a relationship between students' knowledge and social distance in the three cities. Students' attitudes were associated with knowing someone with mental health problems in Osaka and Busan, but not in Shenyang. The results indicated that the students in the three cities have misunderstandings and stigmatising attitudes, although there are differences in the degree of stigmatisation and its factors.
    International Journal of Culture and Mental Health 01/2014; 7(3).
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    ABSTRACT: Clinical psychology is an underdeveloped profession in Ghana, with insufficient empirical research to guide interventions. In the face of this, it is unclear whether individuals may benefit more from localized interventions that incorporate cultural traditions and spiritual beliefs, rather than solely Westernized interventions. To better inform interventions and advocate for improved mental health policy in Ghana, this study sought to explore possible relationships between depression, anxiety, somatization, general psychological wellbeing and spirituality. The study also explored Ghanaians' subjective self-assessments of spirituality and perceptions of the causes and treatments of mental illness using qualitative in-depth responses. Results from the adult sample of 448 Christians, Muslims and Traditionalists showed significant negative correlations between depression, psychological wellness and spirituality. Qualitative responses revealed that while spiritual interventions for mental disorders was most frequently stated, a large number of responses favored psychological interventions as treatment options as well. The implications of these for treatment and policy are discussed.
    International Journal of Culture and Mental Health 01/2014; 7(2).
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    ABSTRACT: A range of service development initiatives has been implemented in Australia to improve the cultural responsiveness of mental health services. In Victoria, cultural portfolio holders (CPHs) are responsible for leading service development activities that address the needs of individuals and families from different cultural backgrounds. The aim of this research was to obtain consensus from CPHs around how their role contributes to improving the cultural responsiveness of mental health services. Information from a literature review and a focus-group discussion with 13 CPHs was used to develop a survey. All CPH network members were then invited to participate in an online study that collected background information and consisted of two surveys. Consensus was reached regarding 42 statements. These concerned activities undertaken by CPHs within services and with other organisations, the position of CPHs within organisational structures and the potential for further developing the CPH role. Cultural portfolio holders have the potential to lead service reforms that can improve an organisation's cultural responsiveness. To do so they require the support of organisation-based leaders and a statewide transcultural mental health service.
    International Journal of Culture and Mental Health 01/2014; 7(3).
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    ABSTRACT: Positive effects of benevolence and prosocial behavior on mental and physical health have been well documented in psychological literature. Within this empirical framework, the present study explores the relationship between cultural norms and emotional health based on cognitive data collected in Sweden (2008–2009, n=128). Ethnographic data suggest that socialization of appropriate cultural conduct (i.e., achieving competence in normative culture and acquiring corresponding cultural models) generally precludes successful recruitment of social support and does not stimulate growth of social networks in Sweden. The results of the present study indicate that individual endorsement of several normative dimensions was associated with measures of negative psychological attitudes (e.g., distrust, indifference, perfectionism and insecurity) in the Swedish sample. Neither individual cultural competence nor informants endorsement of Swedish normative dimensions were found to affect subjective wellbeing in the data, but lower scores on the first normative factor predicted higher likelihood of forming negative mental habits, as did male gender. Implications for studying the effects of norm internalization on psychological life are discussed.
    International Journal of Culture and Mental Health 01/2014; 7(2).
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    ABSTRACT: Studies on attitudes towards suicide are important in the designing of suicide prevention efforts. However, relatively little research has been conducted on attitudes toward suicide in low-income countries as compared to high-income countries. This study was conducted in Uganda and is based on discourse analysis of data collected from 28 focus-group discussions and 30 key informant interviews. Four discourses emerged: long-term illness, failed love affair, death of a loved one and loss of property. In all the four discourses there was a struggle within the individual to articulate both individualistic (I) and communal (We) views on suicide, where the communal views always submerged the individual views. In urban areas, however, more individual views could emerge and be sustained. Communalism is still strong among the Baganda, though its influence in urban areas may be starting to wane due to modernization. Suicide prevention in Uganda should take care of this diversity in planning suicide-prevention programs in future.
    International Journal of Culture and Mental Health 01/2014; 7(2).
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    ABSTRACT: This paper outlines the nature of spiritual healing from Islamic perspectives based upon the writings of early Muslim scholars, the Islamic mystical tradition and a discussion of common traditional Muslim healing practices useful for clinical application. Practical intervention strategies are discussed within an Islamic-based theoretical framework that outlines the four major elements of the human being. These practices include cognitive restructuring using the Qur'an and traditions of Prophet Mohammed, spiritual remedies presented through the repetition of prescribed prayers, invoking blessings upon the Prophet and reflecting upon a behavioral log of daily actions. These spiritually oriented interventions are accompanied by therapy markers for presentation and are categorized into treatments that align to the corresponding human elements of cognition, behavioral inclination or spirituality. Recommendations for professional practice and future research are also offered.
    International Journal of Culture and Mental Health 01/2014; 7(3).