Clinical and Translational Science

Publisher: Blackwell Publishing

Description

  • Impact factor
    2.33
  • 5-year impact
    2.38
  • Cited half-life
    2.90
  • Immediacy index
    0.44
  • Eigenfactor
    0.00
  • Article influence
    0.86
  • Other titles
    CTS
  • ISSN
    1752-8062
  • OCLC
    239510541
  • Material type
    Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Blackwell Publishing

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author cannot archive a post-print version
  • Restrictions
    • Some journals impose embargoes typically of 6 or 12 months, occasionally of 24 months
    • no listing of affected journals available as yet
  • Conditions
    • See Wiley-Blackwell entry for articles after February 2007
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • On author's server, institutional server or subject-based server
    • Server must be non-commercial
    • Publisher copyright and source must be acknowledged with set statement ("The definitive version is available at www.blackwell-synergy.com")
    • Articles in some journals can be made Open Access on payment of additional charge
    • 'Blackwell Publishing' is an imprint of 'Wiley'
  • Classification
    ​ yellow

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Peer education offers a novel strategy for the translation of health promotion interventions in hard-to-reach communities. We describe the development, implementation, and evaluation of a program where research participants from a cardiovascular risk reduction intervention were invited to be trained as peer educators. The goal of the "Heart-to-Heart" intervention was to promote healthy behaviors among peers to reduce cardiovascular disease risk. We recruited and trained 32 peer educators from a rural, Midwestern community to implement the program, and 18 educators reached 175 women and men. A mixed-method analysis revealed that those who opted to become peer educators were more likely to be African American than participants of the study population from which they were recruited. Peer educators reported positive assessments of their encounters with respect to preparation and confidence, as well as reinforced personal health behaviors. Peer educators' success was evident in reports from the individuals they reached, who reported learning new concepts and intention to change behavior. Interviews with peer educators revealed their motivations, peer education barriers, and recommendations. The Heart-to-Heart model for training research participants to serve as peer educators to disseminate behavior change messages warrants further investigation as a strategy for the translation of research to communities.
    Clinical and Translational Science 12/2014; 7(6):476-481.
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    ABSTRACT: Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) constitute an emerging group of noncoding RNAs, which regulate gene expression. Their role in cardiac disease is poorly known. Here, we investigated the association between lncRNAs and left ventricular hypertrophy.
    Clinical and Translational Science 11/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: A major national priority is establishing an effective infrastructure for translation of scientific discoveries into the community. Knowledge and practice continue to accelerate in health research yet healthcare recommendation adoption remains slow for practitioners, patients, and communities. Two areas of research placed in the later stages of the translational research spectrum, Community Engagement in Research and Comparative Effectiveness Research, are ideal for approaching this challenge collaboratively. The Clinical and Translational Science Institute of Southeastern Wisconsin convened academics and community-based organizations familiar with these fields of research in a 1-day workshop to establish an initial dialogue on similarities and differences with a goal of exploring ways to operationalize a collective effort. Participants represented four academic institutions and twelve other healthcare and community-based service organizations. Primary fields of study included community engaged research, comparative effectiveness research, psychology, clinical research, administration, nursing, public health, education, and other professionals. This initial report outlines the results of this diverse discussion and provides insights into the priorities, diverging issues, and areas for future examination and practice. Key discoveries reveal clear crosscutting issues, value in philosophical and provocative discussions among investigators, a need for practice and lessons learned, and bidirectional exchange with community representation.
    Clinical and Translational Science 11/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Success of the Clinical Translational Science Award (CTSA) program implicitly demands team science efforts and well-orchestrated collaboration across the translational silos (T1–T4). Networks have proven to be useful abstractions of research collaborations. Networks provide novel system-level insights and exhibit marked changes in response to external interventions, making them potential evaluation tools that complement more traditional approaches. This study is part of our ongoing efforts to assess the impact of the CTSA on Biomedical Research Grant Collaboration (BRGC). Collaborative research grants are a complex undertaking and an outcome of sustained interaction among researchers. In this report, BRGC networks representing collaborations among CTSA-affiliated investigators constructed from grants management system data at the University of Kentucky across a period of six years (2007–2012) corresponding to pre- and post-CTSA are investigated. Overlapping community structure detection algorithms, in conjunction with surrogate testing, revealed the presence of intricate research communities rejecting random graphs as generative mechanisms. The deviation from randomness was especially pronounced post-CTSA, reflecting an increasing trend in collaborations and team-science efforts potentially as a result of CTSA. Intercommunity cross talk was especially pronounced post-CTSA.
    Clinical and Translational Science 11/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Background At present, the expression of MOR1 and its function in gastric cancer remains unclear with evidence suggesting that it is to be involved in tumor progression and metastasis. The study was to assess the clinicopathologic relevance and prognostic value of MOR1 expression in gastric cancer.Methods Real-time quantitative RT-PCR and immunohistochemical staining were used to detect MOR1 expression in primary gastric cancerous surgical specimens and adjacent nontumorous tissues.ResultsHigh MOR1 expression was detected in cancerous tumor compared with their adjacent nontumorous tissues. In addition, the chi-square test revealed that high MOR1 expression was significantly correlated with depth of invasion (p = 0.006), lymph node metastasis (p = 0.001), distant metastasis (p = 0.017), and TNM staging (p = 0.027). Moreover, Kaplan–Meier analysis revealed a significant association between MOR1 expression and overall survival. High expression of MOR1 was identified as an independent and significant predictor gene of reduced postoperative survival.Conclusion We conclude that MOR1 expression may be a useful biomarker for better prediction of the clinical outcome and management of gastric cancer patients.
    Clinical and Translational Science 11/2014;
  • Clinical and Translational Science 11/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Background Recruiting minorities and underserved populations into population-based studies is a long standing challenge. This study examined the feasibility of recruiting adults from a community research registry.Methods Ethnically diverse, bilingual staff attended health fairs, inviting adults to join a registry. We examined rates of successful contact, scheduling, and participation for studies that used the registry.ResultsFive studies queried 6,886 research registry members (48% Hispanic and 38% black) and attempted to contact 2,301 potentially eligible participants; eligibility criteria varied across studies. We successfully contacted 1,130 members, 51.9% were scheduled to participate and of those, 60.8% completed their study appointment. Non-Hispanic whites were less likely than Hispanics to be interested, but among those scheduling an appointment, participation did not differ by race/ethnicity.Conclusion Community research registries are a feasible and efficient method for recruiting minority and underserved adults and may address disparities in access to and participation in health research. Clin Trans Sci 2014; Volume #: 1–3
    Clinical and Translational Science 10/2014;
  • Clinical and Translational Science 10/2014; 7(5).
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    ABSTRACT: The number of clinical research training programs has increased over the past 5–10 years, but few studies have quantitatively evaluated the effectiveness of these programs. The goal of this study was to evaluate the clinical and translational research training program at the University of Cincinnati by comparing the number of National Institutes of Health grants awarded to pediatric fellows who graduated from the MS degree program between 1995 and 2013 versus fellows who did not pursue an MS degree. Among 394 pediatric fellows, 16 of 81 (20%) MS alumni were awarded at least one NIH grant, as compared with 28 of 313 (9%) fellows who did not obtain an MS degree (p < 0.02). In multivariable analysis, MS alumni were more than three times as likely to have received at least one grant than were non-MS fellows (OR = 3.5, 95% CI [1.7–7.2]; C-statistic = 0.71) and MS alumni were more likely to obtain at least one K-series (OR = 4.1, 95% CI [1.6–10.2]; C-statistic = 0.74), M-series (OR = 11.8, 95% CI [3.4–41.4]; C-statistic = 0.81), or R-series (OR = 10.1, 95% CI [2.4–42.8]; C-statistic = 0.74) grant than were non-MS fellows. These findings suggest that graduate training in clinical and translational research prepares graduates for the highly competitive field of clinical and translational research.
    Clinical and Translational Science 10/2014;
  • Clinical and Translational Science 10/2014; 7(5).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Background The Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA) program has raised the profile and the available funding for engagement in biomedical research. Such increased funding and attention may address known barriers to engagement. However, little work has been done to describe experiences across multiple CTSAs, especially how the CTSA structure supports or challenges engagement.Objective We sought to understand the supports and challenges experienced by multiple CTSAs as they pursued community engagement. This knowledge may help guide future efforts to support and enhance community engagement in biomedical research.Methods We conducted semi-structured, in-depth interviews with CTSA community engagement core leaders and staff from the 2006 cohort of CTSAs (n = 12).ResultsA total of 17 interviews with respondents from nine institutions identified three support themes, including: funding, existing relationships with communities, and leadership and a partnership approach at the institution. Six challenge themes arose: need for capacity development, lack of positive relationships with communities, lack of leadership, funding constraints, time and staff constraints, and unsustainable models.Conclusion The CTSAs have brought much-needed attention to community engagement in research, but more can be done to adequately support engagement. Challenges remain that need to be addressed to achieve the potential benefits of engagement. Clin Trans Sci 2014; Volume #: 1–7
    Clinical and Translational Science 09/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Reduction of duplicative Institutional Review Board (IRB) review for multiinstitutional studies is a desirable goal to improve IRB efficiency while enhancing human subject protections. Here we describe the Harvard Catalyst Master Reciprocal Common IRB Reliance Agreement (MRA), a system that provides a legal framework for IRB reliance, with the potential to streamline IRB review processes and reduce administrative burden and barriers to collaborative, multiinstitutional research. The MRA respects the legal autonomy of the signatory institutions while offering a pathway to eliminate duplicative IRB review when appropriate. The Harvard Catalyst MRA provides a robust and flexible model for reciprocal reliance that is both adaptable and scalable. Clin Trans Sci 2014; Volume #: 1–10
    Clinical and Translational Science 09/2014;
  • Source
    Clinical and Translational Science 09/2014;
  • Clinical and Translational Science 08/2014; 7(4).
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    ABSTRACT: Background Medical devices are often introduced prior to randomized-trial evidence of efficacy and this slows completion of trials. Alternative regulatory approaches include restricting device use outside of trials prior to trial evidence of efficacy (like the drug approval process) or restricting out-of-trial use but permitting coverage within trials such as Medicare's Coverage with Study Participation (CSP).Methods We compared the financial impact to manufacturers and insurers of three regulatory alternatives: (1) limited regulation (current approach), (2) CSP, and (3) restrictive regulation (like the current drug approval process). Using data for patent foramen ovale closure devices, we modeled key parameters including recruitment time, probability of device efficacy, market adoption, and device cost/price to calculate profits to manufacturers, costs to insurers, and overall societal impact on health.ResultsFor manufacturers, profits were greatest under CSP—driven by faster market adoption of effective devices—followed by restrictive regulation. Societal health benefit in total quality-adjusted life years was greatest under CSP. Insurers’ expenditures for ineffective devices were greatest with limited regulation. Findings were robust over a reasonable range of probabilities of trial success.Conclusions Regulation restricting out-of-trial device use and extending limited insurance coverage to clinical trial participants may balance manufacturer and societal interests. Clin Trans Sci 2014; Volume #: 1–8
    Clinical and Translational Science 08/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: IntroductionGroup AB plasma, the traditional universal donor plasma product, is a limited resource. We compared outcomes of Group A plasma transfusion in comparison to AB.Methods Analysis of blunt-injured patients who received emergency release plasma from was performed. Multivariable logistic regression was utilized to identify associations with morbidity and mortality.ResultsThere were 191 patients; 115 Group A and 76 Group AB. No differences were seen in age, sex, plasma transfusions, uncrossmatched red blood cells (RBCs), and Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS). Patients who received Group A plasma had significantly lower Injury Severity Score, chest Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS), and scene transfer rate but not head AIS, or abdomen AIS. In addition, significant differences were noted in terms of blood products transfused within 24 hours in those receiving Group A over AB. Development of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), but not mortality, was higher within the AB cohort. No hemolytic or transfusion associated-ARDS reactions were noted in either group. ARDS; RBC transfusion volumes and head AIS were independently associated with mortality.Conclusion Utilization of Group A plasma for emergency blood resuscitation is a safe option which may alleviate potential shortages of AB plasma.
    Clinical and Translational Science 08/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Designed to advance the two-way translational process between basic research and clinical practice, translational medicine has become one of the most important areas in biomedicine. The quantitative evaluation of translational medicine is valuable for the decision making of global translational medical research and funding. Using the scientometric analysis and information extraction techniques, this study quantitatively analyzed the scientific articles on translational medicine. The results showed that translational medicine had significant scientific output and impact, specific core field and institute, and outstanding academic status and benefit. While it is not considered in this study, the patent data are another important indicators that should be integrated in the relevant research in the future. Clin Trans Sci 2014; Volume #: 1-5.
    Clinical and Translational Science 07/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: A number of commentaries have suggested that large studies are more reliable than smaller studies and there is a growing interest in the analysis of “big data” that integrates information from many thousands of persons and/or different data sources. We consider a variety of biases that are likely in the era of big data, including sampling error, measurement error, multiple comparisons errors, aggregation error, and errors associated with the systematic exclusion of information. Using examples from epidemiology, health services research, studies on determinants of health, and clinical trials, we conclude that it is necessary to exercise greater caution to be sure that big sample size does not lead to big inferential errors. Despite the advantages of big studies, large sample size can magnify the bias associated with error resulting from sampling or study design. Clin Trans Sci 2014; Volume #: 1–5
    Clinical and Translational Science 07/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Senior housestaff and junior faculty are often expected to perform clinical research, yet may not always have the requisite knowledge and skills to do so successfully. Formal degree programs provide such knowledge, but require a significant commitment of time and money. Short-term training programs (days to weeks) provide alternative ways to accrue essential information and acquire fundamental methodological skills. Unfortunately, published information about short-term programs is sparse. To encourage discussion and exchange of ideas regarding such programs, we here share our experience developing and implementing INtensive Training in Research Statistics, Ethics, and Protocol Informatics and Design (INTREPID), a 24-day immersion training program in clinical research methodologies. Designing, planning, and offering INTREPID was feasible, and required significant faculty commitment, support personnel and infrastructure, as well as committed trainees. Clin Trans Sci 2014; Volume #: 1–7
    Clinical and Translational Science 07/2014;