Economic & Labour Market Review

Publisher: Great Britain Office for National Statistics, Palgrave Macmillan

Description

  • Impact factor
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  • 5-year impact
    0.00
  • Cited half-life
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  • Immediacy index
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  • Eigenfactor
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  • Article influence
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  • Website
    Economic & Labour Market Review Website
  • Other titles
    Economic and labour market review
  • ISSN
    1751-8334
  • OCLC
    238821669
  • Material type
    Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Palgrave Macmillan

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author cannot archive a post-print version
  • Restrictions
    • 18 months embargo
  • Conditions
    • Pre-print on personal and employers websites, a free public pre-print server
    • Pre-print must state where article has been submitted
    • Must change to accepted by if accepted
    • Once published must update acknowledgement with set statement (see policy)
    • Author's version only
    • Post-print on institutional repository or funding body's repository
    • Must be clearly identified as authors post-peer-review, pre-copy-edit version
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Publisher copyright must be acknowledged with set statement (see policy)
    • Please see link below for list of journals not covered by this policy
  • Classification
    ​ yellow

Publications in this journal

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    ABSTRACT: This report contains charts that compare the Labour Force Survey (LFS) headline three-month average rates for employment, unemployment and economic inactivity with their equivalent single month estimates. The single month estimates are derived from the same data source as the headline three-month figures but are not designated as National Statistics and their use is restricted to helping to understand the movements in the headline three-month averages.
    Economic & Labour Market Review 11/2011; 5(11):1-4.
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    ABSTRACT: Unemployment measures all people who meet the internationally agreed definition of unemployment. It is different from the claimant count, which measures only those people who are claiming unemployment‐related benefits (Jobseeker's Allowance). The number of unemployed people in the UK is substantially higher than the claimant count. Not everyone who is unemployed is eligible for, or claims, Jobseeker's Allowance (JSA). Many unemployed people (especially women) are not eligible for JSA because they have a partner who is in work and/or because of their financial position. While most recipients of JSA would be classified as unemployed, some would fall into the “employed” or “economically inactive” categories.
    Economic & Labour Market Review 10/2011; 5(10):1-3.
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    ABSTRACT: AbstractA revised methodology for whole economy unit labour costs and unit wage costs has been implemented as part of the Q2 2011 Labour Productivity statistical release, published alongside this article on 6 October 2011. These changes are based on recommendations made in a previous article by Turvey (2009). The revised methodology utilises more consistent and robust wage and labour cost estimates for the self‐employed. This paper explains the changes undertaken and demonstrates the impact of these changes on the data.
    Economic & Labour Market Review 10/2011; 5(10):1-9.
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    ABSTRACT: Movements in the LFS data series at the end of 2003 prompted ONS to conduct detailed analysis of the LFS data to determine the reasons behind these movements. Experimental analysis of the data, at the highest aggregate level, was carried out to break the LFS data down into single month periods. This analysis proved useful so has since been produced every month.
    Economic & Labour Market Review 10/2011; 5(10):1-4.
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    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Unemployment measures all people who meet the internationally agreed definition of unemployment. It is different from the claimant count, which measures only those people who are claiming unemployment‐related benefits (Jobseeker's Allowance). The number of unemployed people in the UK is substantially higher than the claimant count. Not everyone who is unemployed is eligible for, or claims, Jobseeker's Allowance (JSA). Many unemployed people (especially women) are not eligible for JSA because they have a partner who is in work and/or because of their financial position. While most recipients of JSA would be classified as unemployed, some would fall into the “employed” or “economically inactive” categories.
    Economic & Labour Market Review 09/2011; 5(9):1-3.
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    Economic & Labour Market Review 08/2011; 5(7):1-7.
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    Economic & Labour Market Review 07/2011; 5(7):1-10.
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    Economic & Labour Market Review 06/2011; 5(6):1-95.
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    ABSTRACT: China's economic growth over the last two decades has been truly remarkable. Averaging near double‐digit percentage growth each year, it is now the second largest economy in the world based on gross domestic product (GDP) and is expected, one day, to overtake the USA and become the largest. China's growth has been predominantly export driven and centred in manufacturing, especially since joining the World Trade Organisation (WTO) in 2001. This article looks at how the rise of China has impacted on the UK's international trade and investment and also how the continuing development of China may affect these in the future.
    Economic & Labour Market Review 05/2011; 5(5):26-45.
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    ABSTRACT: This article presents multi‐factor productivity (MFP) estimates using experimental measures of quality adjusted labour inputs and capital services. Using a growth accounting framework, output growth can be split into the relative contributions of labour and capital inputs, and a residual component called MFP. MFP is also described in the literature as ‘disembodied technical change’, the ‘Solow residual’ or total factor productivity. This approach complements traditional measures of productivity, which focus only on one input ‐ labour ‐ and take account only of the volume of labour and not changes in the composition of labour over time. The most recent data highlights how MFP has declined during the recession at both the whole economy and industry level. The article also backcasts the series to 1970 using the EU KLEMS dataset to create a longer run picture of MFP.
    Economic & Labour Market Review 05/2011; 5(5):67-81.
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    ABSTRACT: Quality‐adjusted labour input (QALI) is a measure of labour input to economic production which takes account of the composition of the workforce as well as volume of hours worked. It provides a more complete picture of the input of labour to the production process than traditional measures, which focus only on the quantity of labour input, and therefore provides a broader perspective in assessing productivity performance. Along with the volume index of capital services, QALI is a key input to multi‐factor productivity and growth accounting analyses. This article presents new estimates of QALI for 1993 to 2009. The series has been extended by an additional year since the previous release (Turvey, Goodridge and Franklin 2010). An additional section backcasts QALI to 1970 using annual ‘labour services’ estimates from the EU KLEMS dataset1.
    Economic & Labour Market Review 04/2011; 5(4):22-46.
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    ABSTRACT: This article presents original work on some aspects of forecasting at the individual business‐ or firm‐level. In particular, two ways are suggested for assessing the accuracy of these forecasts based on the calculation of average percentage errors and the construction of a 95 per cent confidence interval. It is found that the quality of forecasts tend to become increasingly unreliable after two years and that the decay in forecast quality is inversely related to the frequency of the time series ‐ that is the less often a time series is updated/published the faster the deterioration in forecast quality.
    Economic & Labour Market Review 04/2011; 5(4):119-134.
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    ABSTRACT: In May 2011 the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills will publish Business Population Estimates for the UK and Regions 2010. This National Statistics release is a continuation of the series in Small and Medium Enterprise Statistics for the UK and Regions but uses a new methodology to improve the quality of estimates of the number of enterprises1. This article sets out the detail of three major methodological changes and other key changes, and explains how they impact on the estimates by size, legal status, sector and region. To illustrate the combined impact of these methodological changes, the estimate of the number of enterprises at the start of 2009 is presented as a case study. Under the new methodology, there were an estimated 4.4 million enterprises at the start of 2009, compared to 4.8 million reported in Small and Medium Enterprise Statistics 2009.
    Economic & Labour Market Review 04/2011; 5(4):47-67.
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    ABSTRACT: This article uses the Annual Foreign Direct Investment survey to investigate the changing patterns and the determinants of profits from the foreign subsidiaries of UK‐based multinational enterprises. The results show that these profits are greatest in countries which are closely related to the UK historically, linguistically and geographically ‐particularly the USA and the Netherlands. However, low tax economies and the BRICs (Brazil, Russia, India and China) are also becoming more significant. Econometric analysis shows that factors such as openness to trade, GDP per capita, population, human capital and unit labour costs help to explain the level of these profits.
    Economic & Labour Market Review 04/2011; 5(4):108-117.
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    ABSTRACT: The Office for National Statistics (ONS) is currently formalising its plans to implement the latest update to the Standard Occupational Classification 2010 (SOC 2010) which was published in June 2010. This article summarises the major differences between the current classification, SOC 2000 and SOC 2010 and sets out ONS's plans for implementation across a range of household and business surveys.
    Economic & Labour Market Review 03/2011; 5(3):62-65.
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    ABSTRACT: The Annual Survey of Hours and Earnings is the most detailed and comprehensive source of information on levels of earnings, make-up of total earnings and the distribution of earnings of individual employees. This article presents summary analyses from the results of the 2010 ASHE, comparing them with the 2009 results and where relevant the 1997 to 2009 back series. Of particular interest are the variations in earnings between different industries, occupations, regions and age groups and how these variations have changed overtime.
    Economic & Labour Market Review 03/2011; 5(3):14-40.
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    ABSTRACT: In the last couple of years there has been strong interest in economic statistics as the UK economy recovers from its deepest post war recession. This article updates previous work examining the coherence between official economic data published by the Office for National Statistics and widely-used business survey data in the form of the Purchasing Managers Index to include this latest period.
    Economic & Labour Market Review 03/2011; 5(3):66-74.
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    ABSTRACT: This quarter, the focus section of the Regional Economic Indicators article explores the influence of workforce skills on the economic performance of the NUTS 1 regions. The regular part of the article then gives an overview of the economic activity of UK regions in terms of their gross value added (GVA), GVA per head and labour productivity. This is followed by a presentation of headline indicators of regional welfare, other drivers of regional productivity and regional labour market statistics. The indicators cover the nine Government Office Regions of England and the devolved administrations of Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales. These 12 areas comprise level 1 of the European Nomenclature of Units for Territorial Statistics (NUTS level 1) for the UK. The term ‘region’ is used to describe this level of geography for convenience in the rest of this article.
    Economic & Labour Market Review 02/2011; 5(2):133-164.
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    ABSTRACT: The relationship between changes in output and the unemployment rate is of significant interest around times of recession and economic recovery. This article looks at various aspects of this relationship over time, across various constituents of the labour market and across different countries. The article also explores the interactions between changes in the unemployment rate with the household population, economic activity rate, average hours and labour productivity in accounting for recent output movements in the UK economy and how these compare to previous recessions and recoveries.
    Economic & Labour Market Review 02/2011; 5(2):104-132.
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    ABSTRACT: This article uses quarterly data on turnover to analyse the performance of small, medium and large firms between 2001 and 2009. The analysis draws on two firm‐level datasets which are the Monthly Inquiry into Distribution and Services Sector (MIDSS) and the Monthly Production Inquiry (MPI). For the services sector, it is found that small firms were hardest hit by the downturn, followed by medium‐sized firms, which in turn have done worse than large firms. For the manufacturing sector the opposite results were reported. The turnover of large firms fell the most, followed by medium‐sized firms, with smaller firms contracting the least. In both the services and production sector, volatility in turnover has increased during the sample period and in the run up to the recession ‐ a reflection of greater price and output fluctuations in the last three years.
    Economic & Labour Market Review 02/2011; 5(2):32-44.