Economic & Labour Market Review

Publisher: Great Britain Office for National Statistics, Palgrave Macmillan

Journal description

Current impact factor: 0.00

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Additional details

5-year impact 0.00
Cited half-life 0.00
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Website Economic & Labour Market Review Website
Other titles Economic and labour market review
ISSN 1751-8334
OCLC 238821669
Material type Internet resource
Document type Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Palgrave Macmillan

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author cannot archive a post-print version
  • Restrictions
    • 18 months embargo
  • Conditions
    • Pre-print on personal and employers websites, a free public pre-print server
    • Pre-print must state where article has been submitted
    • Must change to accepted by if accepted
    • Once published must update acknowledgement with set statement (see policy)
    • Author's version only
    • Post-print on institutional repository or funding body's repository
    • Must be clearly identified as authors post-peer-review, pre-copy-edit version
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Publisher copyright must be acknowledged with set statement (see policy)
    • Please see link below for list of journals not covered by this policy
  • Classification
    ​ yellow

Publications in this journal

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    ABSTRACT: This report contains charts that compare the Labour Force Survey (LFS) headline three-month average rates for employment, unemployment and economic inactivity with their equivalent single month estimates. The single month estimates are derived from the same data source as the headline three-month figures but are not designated as National Statistics and their use is restricted to helping to understand the movements in the headline three-month averages.
    Economic & Labour Market Review 11/2011; 5(11):1-4. DOI:10.1057/elmr.2011.96
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    ABSTRACT: This article compares micro and macro measures of productivity. Detailed industry-level productivity estimates are key to understanding how the aggregate economy is driven by the performance of particular sectors, and also how certain sectors perform relative to others. A detailed focus is all the more important in the aftermath of the UK's deepest recession since the 1930s. This article aims to aid the analysis of the economy over the recession and comment on which specific industries saw the biggest changes. The article updates the work of Long (2010) by adding two additional years of data from the Annual Business Survey (ABS), 2008 and 2009.
    Economic & Labour Market Review 11/2011; 5(11):1-20. DOI:10.1057/elmr.2011.94
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    ABSTRACT: These estimates of labour market flows are experimental statistics which have been produced as an aid to understanding the movements in the published Labour Force Survey aggregate estimates. They do not have National Statistics status and are not suitable as labour market indicators in their own right. The official LFS estimates are published in the monthly Labour Market Statistical Bulletin.
    Economic & Labour Market Review 11/2011; 5(11):1-13. DOI:10.1057/elmr.2011.95
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    ABSTRACT: This article explains the impact of improvements to Household Final Consumption Expenditure (HHFCE) estimates between 1997 and 2011 incorporated into data released in Blue Book 2011.
    Economic & Labour Market Review 10/2011; 5(10):1-21. DOI:10.1057/elmr.2011.89
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    ABSTRACT: Unemployment measures all people who meet the internationally agreed definition of unemployment. It is different from the claimant count, which measures only those people who are claiming unemployment‐related benefits (Jobseeker's Allowance). The number of unemployed people in the UK is substantially higher than the claimant count. Not everyone who is unemployed is eligible for, or claims, Jobseeker's Allowance (JSA). Many unemployed people (especially women) are not eligible for JSA because they have a partner who is in work and/or because of their financial position. While most recipients of JSA would be classified as unemployed, some would fall into the “employed” or “economically inactive” categories.
    Economic & Labour Market Review 10/2011; 5(10):1-3. DOI:10.1057/elmr.2011.88
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    ABSTRACT: AbstractA revised methodology for whole economy unit labour costs and unit wage costs has been implemented as part of the Q2 2011 Labour Productivity statistical release, published alongside this article on 6 October 2011. These changes are based on recommendations made in a previous article by Turvey (2009). The revised methodology utilises more consistent and robust wage and labour cost estimates for the self‐employed. This paper explains the changes undertaken and demonstrates the impact of these changes on the data.
    Economic & Labour Market Review 10/2011; 5(10):1-9. DOI:10.1057/elmr.2011.85
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    ABSTRACT: This article summarises the effects of methodological, classification and other changes implemented in the Quarterly National Accounts for the second quarter of 2011, with which it is simultaneously published, consistent with the UK National Accounts Blue Book 2011, to be published in November.
    Economic & Labour Market Review 10/2011; 5(10):1-14. DOI:10.1057/elmr.2011.86
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    ABSTRACT: This article summarises the main changes being introduced in this year's annual production of the Blue Book and related publications. It provides information on the key changes to systems and methods, data revisions and functional modifications. It concludes with an outline of future work and improvements.
    Economic & Labour Market Review 10/2011; 5(10):1-113. DOI:10.1057/elmr.2011.90
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    ABSTRACT: Movements in the LFS data series at the end of 2003 prompted ONS to conduct detailed analysis of the LFS data to determine the reasons behind these movements. Experimental analysis of the data, at the highest aggregate level, was carried out to break the LFS data down into single month periods. This analysis proved useful so has since been produced every month.
    Economic & Labour Market Review 10/2011; 5(10):1-4. DOI:10.1057/elmr.2011.87
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    ABSTRACT: Unemployment measures all people who meet the internationally agreed definition of unemployment. It is different from the claimant count, which measures only those people who are claiming unemployment‐related benefits (Jobseeker's Allowance). The number of unemployed people in the UK is substantially higher than the claimant count. Not everyone who is unemployed is eligible for, or claims, Jobseeker's Allowance (JSA). Many unemployed people (especially women) are not eligible for JSA because they have a partner who is in work and/or because of their financial position. While most recipients of JSA would be classified as unemployed, some would fall into the “employed” or “economically inactive” categories.
    Economic & Labour Market Review 09/2011; 5(9):1-3. DOI:10.1057/elmr.2011.77
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    ABSTRACT: As part of wider developments to improve the quality of the UK National Accounts, ONS will introduce two key improvements to the methods by which volume estimates of gross domestic product (GDP) are calculated in the Blue Book 2011 consistent Quarterly National Accounts release, which will be published on 5 October 2011. The first will be the harmonisation of the deflators used across the accounts. The second is replacement of Retail Price Index (RPI) series with Consumer Price Index (CPI) series in forming the deflators.This article sets out how these changes will affect the components of the UK National Accounts. It also explains how this will bring the UK methods into line with international best practice and improve the coherence of volume measures within the UK National Accounts, as well as assisting international comparability.
    Economic & Labour Market Review 09/2011; 5(9):1-22. DOI:10.1057/elmr.2011.80
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    ABSTRACT: The ONS analysis of The effects of taxes and benefits on household income, most recently published in May 2011, examines how the Government's intervention, through taxes and cash benefits, redistributes income among households. The amount by which taxes and benefits redistribute income from richest to poorest, known as their redistributive effect (see text box, ‘Measuring income inequality’) is usually measured by comparing inequality before and after they are added. This periodic analysis updates ‘The redistribution of household income 1977 to 2006/07 article’ published by ONS in 2008. However, it goes further, by separating the redistributive effects over time into two parts, (i) the size of taxes and benefits, and (ii) the rate at which taxes and benefits redistribute income.
    Economic & Labour Market Review 08/2011; 5(8):1-20. DOI:10.1057/elmr.2011.69
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    Economic & Labour Market Review 08/2011; 5(8):1-26. DOI:10.1057/elmr.2011.71
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    Economic & Labour Market Review 08/2011; 5(7):1-7. DOI:10.1057/elmr.2011.72
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    Economic & Labour Market Review 07/2011; 5(7):1-10. DOI:10.1057/elmr.2011.64
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    ABSTRACT: This article introduces the methodological developments to be implemented with the publication of the UK Environmental Accounts on 29 June 2011, primarily the implementation of Standard Industrial Classification 2007 (SIC2007) and the continuing review of road transport methodology for the energy consumption and air emissions statistics. The article also previews other developments planned for the next 2–3 years.
    Economic & Labour Market Review 07/2011; 5(7):1-10. DOI:10.1057/elmr.2011.65
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    Economic & Labour Market Review 06/2011; 5(6):1-95. DOI:10.1057/elmr.2011.60
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    ABSTRACT: Capital services are the measure of capital input preferred for analysing and modelling productivity. Along with quality adjusted labour input, the volume index of capital services is a key input to multi‐factor productivity and growth accounting analyses. This article presents new estimates of capital services for 2009 along with revised estimates for 1950 to 2008. The annual series has been extended by an additional year since the previous release (Wallis, Long and Turvey, 2010) with earlier years updated to incorporate revisions throughout the time series. The experimental quarterly series of whole economy capital services has been extended and revised, while this article presents for the first time an experimental quarterly series of capital services growth for the market sector. During 2009 the growth of whole economy capital services fell to its lowest rate since the series began in 1950. Capital services for the market sector experienced negative annual growth for the first time.
    Economic & Labour Market Review 05/2011; 5(5):46-66. DOI:10.1057/elmr.2011.53
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    ABSTRACT: In July 2009 a special edition of Economic and Labour Market Review presented a series of articles identifying areas for improvement in the coverage of financial statistics under the ‘Developing financial statistics for policy’ programme. This article focuses on the gaps that exist in current statistical coverage of financial activity, especially as it relates to innovation in the financial sector. It is a precursor to the potential development of appropriate statistical measures that will capture the values of new financial instruments and the behaviour of new institutions. The resulting metrics will improve the depth of understanding of financial markets and provide the foundation for relevant and timely macroprudential indicators that will assist in the prediction of systemic risks to financial institutions.
    Economic & Labour Market Review 05/2011; 5(5):82-99. DOI:10.1057/elmr.2011.55