Journal of Mathematics and the Arts (J Math Arts )

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

Description

The Journal of Mathematics and the Arts is a peer reviewed journal that focuses on connections between mathematics and the arts. It publishes articles of interest for readers who are engaged in using mathematics in the creation of works of art, who seek to understand art arising from mathematical or scientific endeavors, or who strive to explore the mathematical implications of artistic works. The term 'art' is intended to include, but not be limited to, two and three dimensional visual art, architecture, drama (stage, screen, or television), prose, poetry, and music. The Journal welcomes mathematics and arts contributions where technology or electronic media serve as a primary means of expression or are integral in the analysis or synthesis of artistic works. The following list, while not exhaustive, indicates a range of topics that fall within the scope of the Journal: Artist's descriptions providing mathematical context, analysis, or insight about their work; The exposition of mathematics intended for interdisciplinary mathematics and arts educators and classroom use; Mathematical techniques and methodologies of interest to practice-based artists; Critical analysis or insight concerning mathematics and art in historical and cultural settings. The Journal also features exhibition reviews, book reviews, and correspondence relevant to mathematics and the arts.

  • Impact factor
    0.00
  • 5-year impact
    0.00
  • Cited half-life
    0.00
  • Immediacy index
    0.00
  • Eigenfactor
    0.00
  • Article influence
    0.00
  • Website
    Journal of Mathematics and the Arts website
  • Other titles
    Journal of mathematics and the arts
  • ISSN
    1751-3472
  • OCLC
    123754299
  • Material type
    Document, Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Taylor & Francis

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author cannot archive a post-print version
  • Restrictions
    • 12 month embargo for STM, Behavioural Science and Public Health Journals
    • 18 month embargo for SSH journals
  • Conditions
    • Some individual journals may have policies prohibiting pre-print archiving
    • Pre-print on authors own website, Institutional or Subject Repository
    • Post-print on authors own website, Institutional or Subject Repository
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • On a non-profit server
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Set statements to accompany deposits (see policy)
    • Publisher will deposit to PMC on behalf of NIH authors.
    • STM: Science, Technology and Medicine
    • SSH: Social Science and Humanities
    • 'Taylor & Francis (Psychology Press)' is an imprint of 'Taylor & Francis'
  • Classification
    ​ yellow

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: I present the development of a modular origami design based upon the Pajarita, a figure from the traditional Spanish paper-folding art. The work is a modular cube decorated with Pajaritas with the colour pattern produced by folding of individual units to be topologically identical but with distinct colour patterns on each. The mathematics of the cube-colouring and unit-colouring problems are analysed. Two unique solutions are found and presented for the easiest possible cube and a solution for the hardest possible cube.
    Journal of Mathematics and the Arts 01/2013; 7(1).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We describe the solution to a mathematical question that arises in the context of constructing four-couple dances in which there is no repetition in the positions and partnerships formed by the dancers during the intermediate stages of the dance. Our description makes use of various properties of permutations and cycle notation which are well known to mathematicians but probably less so more broadly. An implementation of the mathematical solution as an actual dance is discussed. We also consider generalizations of the original problem and explain a connection with the theory of orthogonal Latin squares.
    Journal of Mathematics and the Arts 01/2013; 7(1).
  • Journal of Mathematics and the Arts 01/2013; 7(2).
  • Journal of Mathematics and the Arts 01/2013; 7(2).
  • Journal of Mathematics and the Arts 01/2013; 7(1).
  • Journal of Mathematics and the Arts 01/2013; 7.
  • Journal of Mathematics and the Arts 01/2013; 7.
  • Journal of Mathematics and the Arts 01/2013; 7.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In 1704 Father Sébastien Truchet published an article, ‘Mémoire sur les combinaisons’, that describes his mathematical and artistic investigations into how a simple set of square tiles, each divided by a diagonal into a white half and a black half, can be arranged to form an infinity of pleasing designs. In this paper, we describe how to modify Truchet’s tiles so that a collection of them can be used for halftoning, the reproduction of user-supplied greyscale target images in pure black and white. We do this by allowing the diagonals of the tiles to ‘flex’ or bend at their midpoints in accordance with the brightness of an individual pixel, or a collection of pixels, from the target image. We also present hexagonal variations, a similar scheme for the Truchet-like tiles – each decorated with two quarter-circle arcs centred at opposite corners of the square – proposed by Cyril Stanley Smith in 1987, and an extension that can be applied to all regular and semiregular tilings.
    Journal of Mathematics and the Arts 01/2013; 7.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The domain-colouring algorithm for visualizing complex-valued functions, when used with complex Fourier series, offers novel techniques to produce mathematical art. Using a photograph instead of the usual colour wheel of the algorithm, the artist can incorporate colours and textures in designs that are symmetric, yet organic. Techniques are described in detail, including methods to create rosettes, friezes and wallpaper patterns, with various types of colour symmetry. The techniques permit new approaches to pattern metamorphosis, as seen in the work of M.C. Escher.
    Journal of Mathematics and the Arts 01/2013; 7(2).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Different geometric realizations of topological Klein bottles are discussed and analysed in terms of whether they can be smoothly transformed into one another and thus belong into the same regular homotopy class. Simple and distinct representatives for each of the four expected classes are introduced. In addition, novel and unusual geometries for Klein bottles are presented, some of them knotted, which may serve as proposals for large-scale sculptures.
    Journal of Mathematics and the Arts 01/2013; 7(2).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Many fractal curves can be produced as the limit of a sequence of polygonal curves, where the curves are generated via an iterative process, for example, an L-system. One can visualize such a sequence of curves as an animation that steps through the sequence. A small part of the curve at one step of the iteration is close to a corresponding part of the curve at the previous step, and so it is natural to add frames to our animation that continuously interpolate between the curves of the iteration. We introduce sculptural forms based on replacing the time dimension of such an animation with a space dimension, producing a surface. The distances between the steps of the sequence are scaled exponentially, so that self-similarity of the set of polygonal curves is reflected in self-similarity of the surface. For surfaces based on the constructions of certain fractal curves, the approximating polygonal curves self-intersect, which means that the resulting surface would also self-intersect. To fix this we smooth the polygonal curves. We outline and compare two different approaches to producing and smoothing the geometry of such a ‘developing fractal curve’ surface, one based on using Bézier splines and the other based on Loop subdivision of a coarse polygonal control mesh.
    Journal of Mathematics and the Arts 01/2013; 7.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In this paper, we discuss the nature of randomness in the arts and some of its underlying mathematical principles. Our aim is to give the reader an overview of the usage of randomness in the visual arts and contrast it with the design of randomness on the computer. We are especially interested in the evolutionary process of random paintings and dynamic algorithms, related to works in animated generative art. Exemplarily, we consider pieces of Arnulf Rainer, Jackson Pollock, Mark Rothko and Alexander Cozens and draw connections to animations generated by algorithms using random functions.
    Journal of Mathematics and the Arts 01/2013; 7(1).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In this paper a variable neighbourhood search (VNS) algorithm is developed that can generate musical fragments of arbitrary length consisting of a cantus firmus and a first species counterpoint melody. The objective function of the algorithm is based on a quantification of existing counterpoint rules. The VNS algorithm developed in this paper is a local search algorithm that starts from a randomly generated melody and improves it by changing one or two notes at a time. A thorough parametric analysis of the VNS reveals the significance of the algorithm’s parameters on the quality of the composed fragment, as well as their optimal settings. The VNS algorithm has been implemented in a user-friendly software environment for composition, called Optimuse. Optimuse allows a user to specify a number of characteristics such as length, key, and mode. Based on this information, Optimuse “composes” both a cantus firmus and a first species counterpoint melody. Alternatively, the user may specify a cantus firmus, and let Optimuse compose only an accompanying first species counterpoint melody.
    Journal of Mathematics and the Arts 12/2012; 6(4):169-189.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Our understanding of creativity is limited, yet there is substantial research trying to mimic human creativity in artificial systems and in particular to produce systems that automatically evolve art appreciated by humans. We propose here to study human visual preference through observation of nearly 500 user sessions with a simple evolutionary art system. The progress of a set of aesthetic measures throughout each interactive user session is monitored and subsequently mimicked by automatic evolution in an attempt to produce an image to the liking of the human user.
    Journal of Mathematics and the Arts 06/2012; 2-3(June-September 2012):107-124.
  • Journal of Mathematics and the Arts 01/2012;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The tympanum above the door in the eastern portal of the Friday Mosque (Masjid-i Jami) in Yazd, Iran, contains a 2-level Islamic geometric pattern of a type not described before. The large-scale pattern has wide pathways outlining compartments; the small-scale pattern runs continuously across the paths and compartments with the different roles being separated only through the use of colour. We present a hierarchical modular construction with three layers to explain its structure.
    Journal of Mathematics and the Arts 01/2012; 6(4).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We introduce a modular design system, which we call the Central Asian modular design system (CAMS), that is based on the pre-Islamic Star and Cross pattern. It can be used to generate a large family of traditional Islamic patterns found in Central Asia and Iran. In other examples of Islamic modular systems, the modules form a substrate that is used in construction and then deleted; in this case the modules themselves form the finished pattern. We also analyse some traditional two-level geometric patterns as hierarchical structures of CAMS modules, corroborating the principles of two-level pattern construction found in other Islamic modular systems.
    Journal of Mathematics and the Arts 01/2012; 6(1):29-42.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Tilings of the plane, especially periodic tilings, can be used as the basis for flat bead weaving patterns called angle weaves. We describe specific ways to create intricate and beautiful angle weaves from periodic tilings, by placing beads on or near the vertices or edges of a tiling and weaving them together with thread. We also introduce the notion of star tilings and their associated angle weaves. We organize the angle weaves that we create into several classes, and explore some of the relationships among them. We then use the results to design graphic illustrations of many layered patterns. Finally, we prove that every normal tiling induces an angle weave, providing many opportunities for further exploration.
    Journal of Mathematics and the Arts 01/2012; 6(4).

Related Journals