Journalism Practice (Journalism Pract )

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

Description

Journalism Practice is a new scholarly, international and multidisciplinary journal, published three times a year by Routledge, Taylor & Francis, which provides opportunities for reflective, critical and research-based studies focused on the professional practice of journalism. The emphasis on journalism practice does not imply any false or intellectually disabling disconnect between theory and practice, but simply an assertion that Journalism Practice's primary concern will be to analyse and explore issues of practice and professional relevance. Journalism Practice is an intellectually rigorous journal with all contributions being refereed anonymously by acknowledged international experts in the field. An intellectually lively, but professionally experienced, Editorial Board with a wide-ranging experience of journalism practice advises and supports the Editor. Journalism Practice is devoted to: the study and analysis of significant issues arising from journalism as a field of professional practice; relevant developments in journalism training and education, as well as the construction of a reflective curriculum for journalism; analysis of journalism practice across the distinctive but converging media platforms of magazines, newspapers, online, radio and television; and the provision of a public space for practice-led, scholarly contributions from journalists as well as academics. Journalism Practice's ambitious scope includes the history of journalism practice; the professional practice of journalism; journalism training and education; journalism practice and new technology; journalism practice and ethics; and journalism practice and policy. It is hoped that Journalism Practice will complement current trends to expansion in the teaching and analysis of journalism practice within the academy, reflection on the emergence of a reflective curriculum and thereby help to consolidate journalism as an intellectual discipline within the landscape of higher education.

  • Impact factor
    0.00
  • 5-year impact
    0.00
  • Cited half-life
    0.00
  • Immediacy index
    0.00
  • Eigenfactor
    0.00
  • Article influence
    0.00
  • Website
    Journalism Practice website
  • Other titles
    Journalism practice (Online)
  • ISSN
    1751-2786
  • OCLC
    85771418
  • Material type
    Document, Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Taylor & Francis

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Some individual journals may have policies prohibiting pre-print archiving
    • On author's personal website or departmental website immediately
    • On institutional repository or subject-based repository after either 12 months embargo for STM, Behavioural Science and Public Health Journals or 18 months embargo for SSH journals
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • On a non-profit server
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Set statements to accompany deposits (see policy)
    • The publisher will deposit in on behalf of authors to a designated institutional repository including PubMed Central, where a deposit agreement exists with the repository
    • STM: Science, Technology and Medicine
    • SSH: Social Science and Humanities
    • Publisher last contacted on 25/03/2014
    • 'Taylor & Francis (Psychology Press)' is an imprint of 'Taylor & Francis'
  • Classification
    ​ green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This essay provides a metatheoretical framework for understanding the complexities surrounding African journalism in the era of interactive digital technologies. It argues for the continued relevance of traditional theoretical paradigms, and submits that radical calls to develop new theories as well as to de-Westernise contemporary journalism studies through exclusively deploying “home-grown” concepts such as ubuntuism are not necessarily always viable. Rather, there is more to gain from appropriating traditional theories and identifying possible synergies between the “old”, predominantly Western approaches, and the “new digital phenomena”, and weaving out of that dialogue, approaches that are not radically different but are in tune with the uniqueness of African experiences. This approach, as the study argues, is particularly important given that journalism (including its appropriation of new technologies) always takes on the form and colouring of the social structure in which it operates. The study thus draws on social constructivist approaches to technology and the sociology of journalism, as well as an array of theoretical concerns from African journalism scholarship to offer a possible direction for a conceptual framework that can help us to capture the complex imbrications between new digital technologies and journalism practice in Africa.
    Journalism Practice 01/2015; 9(1).
  • Journalism Practice 11/2014; 8(6).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Social media allow everyone to show off their personalities and to publicly express opinions and engage in discussions on politicised matters, and as political news journalists engage in social media practices, one might ask if all political news journalists will finally end up as self-promoting political pundits. This study examines the way political news journalists use social media and how these practices might challenge journalistic norms related to professional distance and neutrality. The study uses cluster analysis and detects five user types among political news journalists: the sceptics, the networkers, the two-faced, the opiners, and the sparks. The study finds, among other things, a sharp divide between the way political reporters and political commentators use social media. Very few reporters are comfortable sharing political opinions or blurring the boundaries between the personal and the professional, indicating that traditional journalistic norms still stand in political news journalism.
    Journalism Practice 11/2014; 8(6).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Contemporary photojournalists are seeing their fellow photojournalists being laid off, are struggling to defend their professional values, and all the while having their own hard-fought photographs displayed next to blurry and grainy amateur images taken by mere happenstance. Professional photojournalists and citizen photojournalists are performing similar work, but have very differing understandings of photojournalism values and—importantly—of each other. The purpose of this study was to glean an insight into professional photojournalists' and citizen photojournalists' perceptions of photojournalism values through a coorientational framework. The results revealed that professional photojournalists may dislike citizen photojournalists and generally do not understand them accurately, hinting toward a sense of professional threat. Citizen photojournalists, on the other hand, are more accurate and may seek to model themselves on professional photojournalists.
    Journalism Practice 11/2014; 8(6).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: News norms and routines explain many of the factors influencing political news coverage today. In satisfying competitive pressures and the 24-hour news hole, scholars cite growing—albeit troubling—trends in campaign news coverage including negativity, soft news, and cynicism. This paper extends the theoretical conventions of news norms and routines to the spectacle of mediated presidential debates. Using a sample of transcripts from US presidential debates, 1992–2012, this qualitative content analysis explores the extent to which news norms and values in the new news environment influence moderator debate agendas, extending previous research to span multiple election cycles. I find that news routines condition journalists moderating debates to pose soft news, cynical and conflict-driven debate questions which may ultimately crowd out more informative policy-related content.
    Journalism Practice 11/2014; 8(6).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: A growing share of the media content we encounter as consumers and investigate as scholars is produced by journalists in non-standard employment situations. Researching the labour conditions of freelancers and interns can help us to understand important aspects of contemporary journalism—as well as the role it may or may not be able to perform in postmodern democracies. This article presents results from a research project that explores this growing yet understudied segment of atypical labour in journalism. The analysis is based on a review of recent literature on news production and working conditions in the media as well as 18 in-depth interviews conducted with interns and freelancers in Germany.
    Journalism Practice 11/2014; 8(6).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Self-determination theory says intrinsic and extrinsic motivations influence our goal-oriented behavior and determine satisfaction. For TV news workers, those motivations include deadlines, breaking news, multiple-screen obligations, competition, and the desire to produce quality journalism each day. In this study of nearly 900 broadcasters, those with work autonomy and organizational support have a great deal of job satisfaction and say they are producing a high quality of journalism. Of the sample, 19 percent (N = 155) who said they intend to leave TV news within five years had significantly lower levels of job satisfaction, organizational support, autonomy, and perceptions of work quality. The primary reasons for leaving the industry include salary, family issues, and concerns about the quality journalism they are producing.
    Journalism Practice 11/2014; 8(6).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Concern has been raised about the rising influence of public relations on scientific news coverage and the potential role of institutional sources in shaping news reports. This study uses quantitative content analysis and qualitative interviews to explore the influence of public relations activities on newspaper coverage of “superfoods” and, in particular, to explore the transparency of reporting of the sources of research funding. Superfoods were chosen as a case study because the term is applied to a wide range of foods with potential health benefits (e.g. foods high in antioxidants). Furthermore, foods labelled as “superfoods” have seen sharp increases in sales, suggesting a potential commercial incentive for such labelling. Analysis of a sample of news articles reporting superfoods revealed a considerable influence for media releases in shaping the content of reports, while less than a third of reports discussing research studies funded by organisations with a commercial interest in the findings mentioned the funding sources. Qualitative interviews confirmed the role of press offices in promoting research, particularly from scientific conferences, and suggest that scientific societies are applying less stringent criteria to studies selected for publication than in the past.
    Journalism Practice 11/2014; 8(6).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: US-based print journalists who had won awards for stories about mental illness were interviewed to determine how the coverage of mental illness might be improved. Respondents indicated that a mixture of organizational and personal factors such as editorial support, considerable journalism experience, personal exposure to mental illness, as well as empathy, helped them to produce quality stories. Also noteworthy were respondents' opinions on suggestions in reporting guides about imitation suicides, sensitive language, and positive mental illness news.
    Journalism Practice 11/2014; 8(6).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Now that an increasing number of journalists and editorial offices make use of social media platforms such as Facebook and Twitter to research, break, distribute and discuss the news, social media guidelines are being issued with increasing frequency by news organizations that want to indicate to journalists what is and is not permitted on these platforms. This study investigates how Flemish journalists experience the sense and nonsense of these social media guidelines, focusing on rules that prescribe their behaviour on Twitter. Analysis of 20 in-depth interviews demonstrates that the majority of Flemish journalists find the introduction of rules concerning the use of Twitter unnecessary. The argument heard most often is that the journalist's common sense should be enough to deal with the platform in the proper way. A number of journalists even find the rules a curtailment of individual freedom. Guidelines concerning specific formal requirements—such as mentioning the employer in the Twitter biography and/or account name, or the requirement to only use one account—encounter particular resistance. The journalists interviewed are, however, favourably disposed to a list of non-enforceable recommendations. Based on these findings, the tweeting journalists seem to indicate that they themselves are able to both adapt their use of social media to fit traditional professional norms and adapt those norms to fit the media logic of the Twitter platform.
    Journalism Practice 11/2014; 8(6).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Rapid change in the news industry and the prevalence of layoffs, buyouts, and closings have led many newsworkers to experience job insecurity and worry about their long-term futures in journalism. Our research uses a case study of employees at an independently owned media company in the United States to explore the various ways newsworkers respond to this culture of job insecurity and how their responses affect efforts to change news practices. Findings demonstrate that those who believe their jobs are at risk are unlikely to change their practices and even some who perceive job security are reticent to initiate change. As a result, the culture of job insecurity in the news industry has a limiting effect on changes to journalism practice.
    Journalism Practice 10/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: One of the longest-running ethical debates in visual journalism is the extent to which graphic and/or violent photographs should be present in our news media. The current research is designed to elicit further understanding about this complex topic from a framing effects perspective. The research uses a 2 (level of graphicness) × 3 (story topic) experimental design to test for media effects of graphic photos in regard to such variables as attitude toward the situation and attitude toward continued US involvement in the situation. The three story topics are the 2011 Somalia famine, the 2010 Haiti earthquake, and the 2003 war in Iraq. In addition, the research integrates eye-tracking data—a unique approach to understanding the effects of graphic photographs on participants. The research did not find across the board significant effects in regard to level of graphicness; however, a key finding emerged: the nature of the news story did lead to significant effects. In addition, the inclusion of eye-tracking data showed that the highly graphic photos more quickly attracted participants' attention and that participants' fixated on highly graphic photos for a longer amount of time.
    Journalism Practice 09/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Book length or long form is where much of Australia's literary journalism is sited. As such, this paper examines three long-form contributions to the recent Australian gender discourse garnered by the prime ministership of Julia Gillard. Julia Gillard was Australia's 27th—and first female—Prime Minister. She came to office determined that gender had not—and would not—play a part in her tenure. She left office embroiled in a gender struggle of acts and words and images unimaginable before they occurred. The media, the Opposition, members of her own party and ordinary Australians took part in a collective denigration of her reputation professionally, politically and personally. It continued unabated for three years, growing in intensity, and only towards the end of her leadership was it truly comprehensively contested in the public sphere; and then, mainly by women writers, writing in the long form. Between April and July 2013, six texts appeared, all either written or edited by women, constellating the notions of gender during and in the wake of Prime Minister Gillard's leadership. This paper examines three of them, long-form counterpoints to the popular and electronic media vilification of former Prime Minister Julia Gillard. In so doing, the paper examines the usage of the words “sexism” and “misogyny” as they were applied in Australia throughout this time.
    Journalism Practice 09/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The advent of new technologies has always spurred questions about changes in journalism—its content, its means of production, and its consumption. A quite recent development in the realm of digital journalism is software-generated content, i.e. automatically produced content. This paper seeks to investigate how readers perceive software-generated content in relation to similar content written by a journalist. The study utilizes an experimental methodology where respondents were subjected to different news articles that were written either by a journalist or were software-generated. The respondents were then asked to answer questions about how they perceived the article—its overall quality, credibility, objectivity, etc. The paper presents the results from an initial small-scale study with findings suggesting that while the software-generated content is perceived as descriptive and boring, it is also considered to be objective although not necessarily discernible from content written by journalists. The paper discusses the results of the study and its implication for journalism practice.
    Journalism Practice 09/2014; 8(5).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This paper examines journalists' changing sourcing practices in the context of an emerging media ecology initiated by processes of globalization, digitization, commercialism and concentration. Social media platforms such as Facebook, Twitter or YouTube provide the means to access a more diverse range of sources, including civil society organizations and ordinary citizens. We developed a quantitative content analysis to examine to what extent Belgian news coverage showed signs of diverse sourcing practices during the 2011 uprisings in three Arab countries. We analysed a total sample of 1121 news items about the street protests in Syria, Egypt and Tunisia, in four Belgian newspapers (two popular and two quality dailies) and two Belgian broadcasters (the public broadcaster VRT and the commercial channel VTM). The analysis shows that ordinary citizens and non-mainstream groups are important news sources and that social media platforms are consulted relatively often compared to everyday foreign news coverage. In terms of inter-media differences, the findings show that broadcasters' dependency on video footage and eyewitness accounts is reflected in their use of ordinary citizen sources and amateur footage. Moreover, the analysis confirms that quality newspapers display more diverse and more innovative sourcing practices than popular newspapers.
    Journalism Practice 09/2014; 8(5).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This article investigates innovation in the media business models that some European minority-language news organizations are implementing in these times of economic crisis. It entails a shift in the underlying business and service philosophy which interpellates the community and pleads for a change in their mutual relationship. The research is based on the case studies of two private media companies from the Catalan and Basque language media systems that were experiencing economic and financial difficulties. Conducting inspirational advertising campaigns, the news organizations issued a call for readers and non-readers to make a funding commitment to the project, a pledge to provide new revenues and liaisons, while retaining and enhancing the standard income streams. In brief, it is about going back to the basics of active community projects and involvement.
    Journalism Practice 09/2014; 8(5).
  • Article: Textual DNA
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: For the first time, this paper studies the evolution of photojournalists' bylines compared to reporters' bylines, which proved a sensitive barometer of longitudinal changes in reporters' status, professionalism, creativity and authorship. Based on a sample of 8800 photographs and news items published across the twentieth century in five quality national dailies: New York Times, The Times of London, Le Figaro, Irish Times and Ha'aretz, this paper shows that photojournalists were discriminated against substantially, consistently and internationally throughout the entire century, lagging not only behind reporters, but also behind the growing centrality of their own photographs. This paper suggests that attribution of photojournalists was hindered by the perception of photography as an objective reproduction of reality that has a weaker claim to attribution; by publishers being attributed of photographic authorship; by the efforts of textual journalists to preserve their superior jurisdiction over news reporting, constructing the inferiority of photojournalism and restricting it to denotative functions; and by the conceptual separation between the growing significance of photography, and the secondary status of its creators, who remain visual creatures in a predominantly textual kingdom. Findings indicate how textual the DNA of the Western press is, which makes its survival more difficult in an increasingly visual world.
    Journalism Practice 09/2014; 8(5).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The ability to add hyperlinks to a news story is a key feature of online news. In addition to the—aging—technical novelty, one can wonder what functions hyperlinks perform in news stories. Previous research, as well as my previous examination of meta-journalistic discourses, has shown that one of the alleged functions of links is to display the writer's sources. In that sense, hyperlinks are “journalistic objects of evidence” as they can directly point to the documents, data or discourses used as rough material for a news story. The present paper puts that particular function of hyperlinks to the test. It conducts a content analysis on a sub-sample of the stories published on six Belgian news sites that contain at least one external link, and compares the links with the sources explicitly mentioned in the news story itself. Results highlight that links and the mentions of sources do not overlap completely. Many sources are not reflected in links, and most links do not point to primary sources per se. Other functions of links emerge, such as providing a service or contextual information to the readers. These findings thus question the material nature of “journalistic objects of evidence” and the possibility for journalists to build networks of distributed responsibility with links.
    Journalism Practice 09/2014; 8(5).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Despite the current insecurity within the journalistic profession, there is still some common ground uniting news workers: a shared perception of the role of journalism in Western societies—a social agreement between journalists, media owners and audiences as to what is good journalism. Research has shown that this role rests heavily upon notions of journalists as watchdogs of democracy, and sometimes as pedagogues and interpreters of complex events. However, this role is not static in any sense; it changes along with the news industry and the surrounding society. The question is, how? This article addresses this question by examining the case of Swedish journalists. Empirical support is drawn from the Swedish Journalist Survey, which has been conducted on five occasions between 1989 and 2011, thus providing a unique opportunity to follow changes to a journalistic community over time. The results indicate the far-reaching adaptability of Swedish journalists to new conditions; a liberalization of ideals, such that ideals of objectivity and neutrality are strengthening at a rather quick pace. However, the results also show how they close ranks behind the watchdog ideal, which could be interpreted as an act of resistance.
    Journalism Practice 09/2014; 8(5).