International Breastfeeding Journal

Publisher: BioMed Central Ltd

Description

International Breastfeeding Journal is an open access, peer-reviewed, online journal soon to be launched by BioMed Central. International Breastfeeding Journal will encompass all aspects of breastfeeding. Breastfeeding is recognized as an important public health issue with enormous social and economic implications. In order to help women breastfeed successfully there is a need to understand both the physiology of lactation and the social and cultural context within which breastfeeding occurs. International Breastfeeding Journal seeks to address all of these aspects, including the impediments to breastfeeding, the health effects of not breastfeeding for infants and their mothers, and the management of breastfeeding problems. The journal will consider the following article types: research, reviews, case reports, study protocols, short reports, methodology, commentaries, hypotheses, and debate articles.

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  • Website
    International Breastfeeding Journal website
  • Other titles
    International breastfeeding journal
  • ISSN
    1746-4358
  • OCLC
    66944758
  • Material type
    Document, Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publications in this journal

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    ABSTRACT: Timely initiation of breastfeeding has been reported to reduce neonatal mortality by 19.1%. The World Health Organisation recommends early initiation of breastfeeding i.e. breastfeeding a newborn within the first hour of life. Knowledge on the rate and the determinants of early initiation of breastfeeding may help health program managers to design and implement effective breastfeeding promotion programs. The aim of this study was to determine the rate and the determinants of early initiation of breastfeeding in Nepal. This study used the data from Nepal Demographic and Health Survey (NDHS) 2011 which is a nationally representative sample study. Chi square test and multiple logistic regression analysis were used to examine the factors associated with early initiation of breastfeeding (within one hour of birth). Of 4079 mothers, 66.4% initiated breastfeeding within one hour of delivery. Mothers with higher education (Odds Ratio (OR) 2.56; 95% CI : 1.26, 5.21), mothers of disadvantaged Janjati ethnicity (OR 1.43; 95% CI : 1.04, 1.94), mothers who were involved in agriculture occupation (OR 1.51; 95% CI : 1.16, 1.97), mothers who delivered in a health facility (OR 1.67; 95% CI : 1.25, 2.23), whose children were large at birth (OR 1.46; 95% CI : 1.07, 1.99) were more likely to initiate breastfeeding within the first hour of child birth. Results suggest that two thirds of children in Nepal were breastfed within the first hour after birth. Although there was a higher prevalence of early initiation of breastfeeding among mothers who delivered in health facilities compared to mothers who delivered at home, universal practice of early initiation of breastfeeding should be a routine practice. The findings suggest the need of breastfeeding promotion programs among the mothers who are less educated, and not working. Such breastfeeding promotion programmes could be implemented via Nepal's extensive network of community-based workers.
    International Breastfeeding Journal 12/2014; 9(1):21.
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    ABSTRACT: Breast milk is the normal way to feed infants and is accepted worldwide as the optimal first source of nutrition. Though the majority intend to breastfeed, many mothers of sick, hospitalized newborns, particularly those of very low birth weight, are unable to provide a full volume of milk due to numerous physical and emotional barriers to breastfeeding. This vulnerable population of infants may benefit most from receiving breast milk nutrition and thus pasteurized donor milk should be the first consideration for supplementation when there is an inadequate supply of mother's own milk. This commentary will briefly review the history of milk banking in Canada, as well as the best available evidence for donor milk use in the very low birth weight population, including available economic analyses, with a view to advocate for its use in these vulnerable infants.
    International Breastfeeding Journal 04/2014; 9(1):4.
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    ABSTRACT: Cosmetic breast augmentation (breast implants) is one of the most common plastic surgery procedures worldwide and uptake in high income countries has increased in the last two decades. Women need information about all associated outcomes in order to make an informed decision regarding whether to undergo cosmetic breast surgery. We conducted a systematic review to assess breastfeeding outcomes among women with breast implants compared to women without.
    International Breastfeeding Journal 01/2014; 9:17.
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    ABSTRACT: The editor of International Breastfeeding Journal would like to thank all our reviewers who have contributed to the journal in Volume 8 (2013).
    International Breastfeeding Journal 01/2014; 9(1):3.
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    ABSTRACT: Health care workers have a duty to promote and support breastfeeding among their clients. Although their ability to do this may be influenced by their knowledge and personal experience; little is known about breastfeeding practices and the perceived barriers. The objective of this study was to assess the breastfeeding practices and the associated factors among female nurses and midwives in North Gondar Zone; Northwest Ethiopia.
    International Breastfeeding Journal 01/2014; 9:11.
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    ABSTRACT: Breastfeeding is one of the components of Primary Health Care in Ethiopia. In Ethiopia a wide range of harmful infant feeding practices has been documented despite the implementation of infant and young child feeding guidelines. However, there is no well documented study of women's perception of breastfeeding patterns and factors associated with delayed initiation of breastfeeding (with timely initiation of breastfeeding being within the first hour) in rural communities of Arba Minch Zuria.
    International Breastfeeding Journal 01/2014; 9:8.
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    ABSTRACT: Accurate measurement of the duration of exclusive breastfeeding is complicated by factors related to definitions, timing, duration of recall, methods of analysis, and sample biases. Clearly prospective methods are likely to be more accurate but are too expensive to use in most large-scale surveys. Internationally, most surveys use a point-in-time or current status measurement (usually 24-hour recall) and report their findings using an indicator established by the World Health Organisation (WHO) in 1991 that involves combining all babies less than six months old in order to obtain a large enough sample size to result in stable proportions that can be compared over time. However, this indicator is complex to understand and explain and is widely misunderstood, even within the breastfeeding community. It is commonly cited in ways that greatly exaggerate how common exclusive breastfeeding actually is.
    International Breastfeeding Journal 01/2014; 9:18.
  • Elizabeth H Shayo, Bodil Bø Våga, Karen Marie Moland, Peter Kamuzora, Astrid Blystad
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    ABSTRACT: Clinical guidelines aim to improve patient outcomes by providing recommendations on appropriate healthcare for specific clinical conditions. Scientific evidence produced over time leads to change in clinical guidelines, and a serious challenge may emerge in the process of communicating the changes to healthcare practitioners and getting new practices adopted. There is very little information on the major barriers to implementing clinical guidelines in low-income settings. Looking at how continual updates to clinical guidelines within a particular health intervention are communicated may shed light on the processes at work. The aim of this paper is to explore how the content of a series of diverging infant feeding guidelines have been communicated to managers in the Prevention of Mother to Child Transmission of HIV Programme (PMTCT) with the aim of generating knowledge about both barriers and facilitating factors in the dissemination of new and updated knowledge in clinical guidelines in the context of weak healthcare systems. A total of 22 in-depth interviews and two focus group discussions were conducted in 2011. All informants were linked to the PMTCT programme in Tanzania. The informants included managers at regional and district levels and health workers at health facility level. The informants demonstrated partial and incomplete knowledge about the recommendations. There was lack of scientific reasoning behind various infant feeding recommendations. The greatest challenges to the successful communication of the infant feeding guidelines were related to slowness of communication, inaccessible jargon-ridden English language in the manuals, lack of summaries, lack of supportive supervision to make the guidelines comprehensible, and the absence of a reading culture. The study encountered substantial gaps in knowledge about the diverse HIV and infant feeding policies. These gaps were partly related to the challenges of communicating the clinical guidelines. There is a need for caution in assuming that important changes in guidelines for clinical practice can easily be translated to and implemented in local programme settings, not least in the context of weak healthcare systems.
    International Breastfeeding Journal 01/2014; 9(1):188.
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    ABSTRACT: Exclusive breastfeeding (EBF) means that the infant receives only breast milk for the first six months of life after birth. In Bangladesh, the prevalence of EBF remained largely unchanged for nearly two decades and was 43% in 2007. However, in 2011, a prevalence of 64% was reported, an increase by 21 percentage points. The reasons for this large change remain speculative at this point. Thus to investigate the issue further, this study was conducted. The objective was to assess the prevalence of EBF and associated factors among mothers having children aged 0-6 months in rural Bangladesh.
    International Breastfeeding Journal 01/2014; 9:7.
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    ABSTRACT: Despite evidence supporting the importance of breastfeeding to child health, breastfeeding practices remain suboptimal in Vietnam. There is currently little evidence on the importance of breastfeeding in the prevention of morbidity during infancy in Vietnam. In order to provide country specific data for policy makers to support breastfeeding friendly policies and programs, analysis was undertaken on a cross-sectional dataset to investigate the association between breastfeeding practices and prevalence of diarrhea and acute respiratory infection (ARI) among infants aged 0-5 months.
    International Breastfeeding Journal 01/2014; 9:12.