Global Crime (Global Crime )

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

Description

With a new name, focus and editorial team, Global Crime will build upon the foundations laid by Transnational Organized Crime to consider serious and organised crime, from its origins to the present. Its focus is deliberately broad and multi-disciplinary, its first aim being to make the best scholarship on organised, serious and transnational crime available to specialists and non-specialists alike. It endorses no particular orthodoxy and will draw on authors from a variety of disciplines, including history, sociology, economics, political science, anthropology and area studies. Furthermore, it covers not just organised crime in the conventional sense, but the whole range of criminal activities, from corruption and illegal market transactions to the shadowy corners where states, terrorist movements and similar actors engage in criminal conspiracy. Global Crime will be published four times per year, and will include substantive research articles, shorter pieces highlighting research in progress and field reports from law-enforcement officials and conference reports. It will also provide unrivalled review coverage of new books and literature on organised crime around the world. All research articles will go through blind peer review in order to maintain the highest academic standards. The editors welcome contributions on any topic relating to organised criminality, its history, activities, relations with the state, its penetration of the economy and its perception in popular culture. Global Crime also seeks submissions in related areas such as corruption, crime and women's studies, illegal migration, terrorism, illicit markets, violence, police studies, and the process of state building. Submissions of articles in the area of methodology are especially welcome. In addition to research articles, the editors encourage submission of conference reports and review papers, shorter pieces on methodological advances or research findings field reports from law enforcement officials, which can give a vivid, non-scholarly description of particular investigations and cases.

  • Impact factor
    0.00
  • 5-year impact
    0.00
  • Cited half-life
    0.00
  • Immediacy index
    0.00
  • Eigenfactor
    0.00
  • Article influence
    0.00
  • Website
    Global Crime website
  • Other titles
    Global crime (Online)
  • ISSN
    1744-0572
  • OCLC
    58876313
  • Material type
    Document, Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Taylor & Francis

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author cannot archive a post-print version
  • Restrictions
    • 12 month embargo for STM, Behavioural Science and Public Health Journals
    • 18 month embargo for SSH journals
  • Conditions
    • Some individual journals may have policies prohibiting pre-print archiving
    • Pre-print on authors own website, Institutional or Subject Repository
    • Post-print on authors own website, Institutional or Subject Repository
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • On a non-profit server
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Set statements to accompany deposits (see policy)
    • Publisher will deposit to PMC on behalf of NIH authors.
    • STM: Science, Technology and Medicine
    • SSH: Social Science and Humanities
    • 'Taylor & Francis (Psychology Press)' is an imprint of 'Taylor & Francis'
  • Classification
    ​ yellow

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Research has shown that irregular migrants were disproportionally present in jihadi networks in the Netherlands between 2001 and 2005. Building on this study by analysing files of closed criminal investigations and interviewing imams and personnel within Asylum Seeker Centres and Detention Centres, this paper explains the attractiveness of jihadi networks by a combination of pragmatic and ideological factors. The studied cases demonstrate how jihadi networks are able to satisfy certain needs of these irregular immigrants in a pragmatic way, and how criminal activities play an important role in this process. They also show how jihadi networks can fill a void for some of these irregular migrants who are in search for meaning and identity. The Jihadi-Salafi ideology does not seem to be the core pull factor explaining the attractiveness of the jihadi networks in this study.
    Global Crime 06/2014;
  • Global Crime 01/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This study estimates the retail value of the illicit drug market in Italy from a consumption-based approach. The illicit drugs considered in this analysis are heroin, cocaine, cannabis (herbal and resin), amphetamines and ecstasy. Results show that the value of the illicit drug market in Italy is much less than previously estimated and quantified at € 3.3 bn. Heroin and cocaine retain the biggest markets in terms of revenues, while cannabis is the most-consumed illicit drug. Synthetic illicit drugs account for roughly 10% of the illicit drug market. Conclusions offer some suggestions as to how uncertainties about estimates of the illicit drug market can be reduced.
    Global Crime 01/2014; 15.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In the current economic crisis, the risk is so high that entrepreneurs, commercial activities and even families may turn to the illegal market to obtain liquidity. This article proposes an estimate of the size of the usury credit market in Italy. The estimate is based on the assumption, provided by Guiso1, that before coming to a moneylender the borrower seeks to obtain credit through official channels. The results of our estimates confirm the seriousness of the problem, but provide much lower data than those reported periodically by the media. It is estimated that 372,000 economic activities may have been potentially involved in the usury market in 2012. The volume of loans disbursed in the illegal market would have amounted to €18 billion. The profits of loan sharks would be between a minimum of €3 billion and a maximum of about €6.1 billion.
    Global Crime 01/2014; 15.
  • Global Crime 01/2014; 15.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Organised crime is a field vulnerable to mythical numbers, i.e. exaggerated estimates lacking empirical support, but acquiring acceptance through repetition. The figures on mafia proceeds in Italy are a striking example of this problem. This study proposes an estimation of mafia proceeds in Italy from nine criminal activities (sexual exploitation of women, illicit firearms trafficking, drug trafficking, counterfeiting, the illicit cigarette trade, illicit gambling, illicit waste disposal, loan sharking, and extortion racketeering) by region and type of mafia (Cosa Nostra, Camorra, ‘Ndrangheta, Apulian mafias, and other mafias). The results estimate yearly mafia proceeds at approximately €10.7 bn (0.7% of the Italian GDP), discussing the impact on the regional and national economies and the differences among the types of mafias as to their geographical sources of revenues.
    Global Crime 01/2014; 15.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This article focuses on four different criminal markets: counterfeiting, illegal firearms trafficking, gambling and waste management. Despite recurrent allegations that these markets have a high mafia presence, there is a lack of reliable estimates of their sizes and the revenues that they generate. Figures in reports and media vary significantly, and the methods used to obtain them are often obscure. This study develops four different estimation methodologies with which to estimate the four criminal markets in Italy at the national and regional levels. Considering that these are the first attempts to estimate these markets, the aim of the article is to stimulate debate on how to improve measurement of the crime proceeds from these criminal markets.
    Global Crime 01/2014; 15.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In this paper, we discuss policies to combat organised crime from the perspective of economic analysis. We introduce concepts such as supply and demand for Mafia and the implied notion of equilibrium to build a framework to classify the contexts in which organised crime interferes with economy. We then use this framework to discuss policy interventions, distinguishing between policies implemented by the State and mobilisation of civil society. We show that using the economic approach helps understand the aspect of persistence of criminal organisations and identify vicious circles of different nature. The broad spectrum of State policies identified includes norms on competition, on the efficiency of the State, on decriminalisation and on market deregulation. Finally, in discussing the mobilisation of civil society, we highlight the problem of coordination, an aspect often overlooked in the literature.
    Global Crime 01/2014; 15.
  • Global Crime 01/2014; 15.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This article presents a methodology which allows to estimate the revenues of the sexual exploitation market, both outdoor and indoor, at subnational level. It is applied to the Italian context. The findings suggest that the revenues are not equally distributed across regions since they depend on different criminal opportunities and levels of demand.
    Global Crime 01/2014; 15.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The purposes of this study were to assess the magnitude of the use of force among Mexico City Metropolitan Area police forces and to detect its correlates. Mexico City is a particularly interesting case as it is often presented as a haven within the national context of crime and violence of the last years. However, it was found that almost one third of prison inmates in the city report to have been beaten or hurt by the police. It was also found that such reports have increased significantly between 2002 and 2009 for the case of the Preventive police, but remained stable although still very high for the Judicial police. Different correlates in the use of force were found for the two police forces.
    Global Crime 01/2014; 15.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This study provides a methodology with which to estimate the volumes and revenues of the illicit cigarette market at the subnational level. It applies the methodology to Italy for a 4-year period (2009–2012), enabling assessment of the prevalence of the illicit trade across years and regions. Notwithstanding the alleged importance of mafias, the results provide a more complex picture of the Italian illicit tobacco market. The maximum total revenues from the illicit trade in tobacco products (ITTP) increased from €0.5 bn in 2009 to €1.2 bn in 2012. The prevalence of illicit cigarettes varies significantly across regions, because of the proximity to countries with cheaper cigarettes and the possible occurrence of other crime opportunities. Understanding of these factors is crucial for the development of appropriate policies against the ITTP. The methodology may be applicable to all other EU countries, providing detailed, yearly estimates of the illicit market at the subnational level.
    Global Crime 01/2014; 15.
  • Global Crime 01/2014; 15.
  • Global Crime 01/2014; 15.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This article addresses the nature and development of the Vietnamese involvement in cannabis cultivation in the Netherlands. The findings are based on empirical data collected from national police registrations, case studies and in-depth interviews with over 30 Dutch and international respondents. The authors describe the background characteristics of Vietnamese cannabis farmers, the structure of the predominantly mono-ethnic Vietnamese criminal groups and the international context. A situational approach to organised crime is applied to illustrate the ‘emergent’ character of the Vietnamese crime groups as opposed to a ‘strategic’ context of organised crime. The Vietnamese supervisors in the Netherlands have legal citizenship and often have ‘careers’ in cannabis-related crimes. It would appear that for a Vietnamese gardener or farmer, the path into cannabis cultivation is linked to financial debt. Besides situational factors, group characteristics, such as the migrant community, seem important in understanding the Vietnamese involvement in the Dutch cannabis market.
    Global Crime 07/2013; 14(4):321.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This paper challenges an empirical claim about the commercial courts (arbitrazhnye sudy) made by Kathryn Hendley and her co-authors in their paper “Law, Relationships and Private Enforcement: Transactional Strategies of Russian Enterprise” in Vol. 52, No. 4, Europe-Asia Studies in 2000. Basing their case on a quantitative survey of Russian firms, they conclude that economic actors in the 1990s relied on ‘the law and legal institutions’ because the commercial courts were relatively effective. In order to test this claim about the link between individual behaviour and the judiciary, I ask: What type of belief about corruption was held by Russian economic actors who trusted the commercial courts for conflict resolution at the end of the 1990s? The data set is drawn from a survey of 227 Russian firms made in 1997. I use self-reported data on economic actors’ preference for using or not using the commercial court (in case of a hypothetical conflict about a considerable amount of money) as a proxy for trust. A binary logistic regression model shows that economic actors who accepted corruption as a fact of life at the time of market entry were three times more likely to trust the commercial courts for conflict resolution than economic actors who rejected corruption. This finding contradicts any reasonable definition of the rule of law and suggests that the neo-liberal reformers should have paid more attention to the content – rather than merely to the speed – of reform.
    Global Crime 01/2013; 14(1).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This paper introduces the contributions included in the special issue of ‘Advances in Research on Illicit Networks’. It situates the collection of papers in the growing trend of studies applying network methods to illicit networks.
    Global Crime 01/2013; 14:119-122.
  • Global Crime 01/2013; 14.

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